HELPING FAMILY FARMS FLOURISH. HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY.

Thursday, August 23, 2012

My new Molcajete and Diana Kennedy’s recipe for Guacamole con Tomate Verde (adapted)

My new Molcajete and my first Guacamole made in it.


Bridgehampton Tomatillos
         Nothing says summer like Guacamole and although we’re thousands of miles from both Mexico and that capital of Guacamole, the state of California, we’re proud of what we’re able to make right here on Long Island.  Of course, the avocados are hardly local. They’re very often not even domestic.  But thanks to a growing and vibrant Mexican community in our midst, “Tomates Verdes”, or tomatillos, are locally grown along with an increasing number of ‘chiles’ like the serranos that are the backbone of a great Guacamole.   But my excitement over making this spicy, rich party dish was multiplied by the arrival of my very own molcajete.  My friend Carlos carried it with him when he arrived from Mexico City this July.  The weight of the thing is astonishing and it’s hardly a carry-on item.  But my new molcajete is the genuine article.  Made it Oaxaca, it arrived seasoned and ready to go.  And I had to marvel at Carlos’ generosity-- never mind his muscle-- at lugging the thing onto a plane.   But it seems that last year I published a recipe for Guacamole that didn’t please Carlos one little bit.

Monday, August 20, 2012

Tian of Summer Vegetables served two ways

One night it's a glorious side dish...
The next day it's a delicious lunch!  

            With our local farm stands brimming with the most beautiful vegetables, it’s a fun challenge to find ways to eat them every chance we get.  Last week I turned to a tian to make use of some glorious summer squash, zucchini and field tomatoes.  The word “Tian” is French and originally referred to the clay cooking casserole used to prepare this Provencal-style mix of vegetables roasted to perfection au gratin -- covered with a layer of cheese.  Interestingly, the French use the word ‘tian’ to describe not just the vegetable version of the dish but anything layered—even a dessert. And in a wonderful coincidence, “Tian” is also the Chinese word for “Heaven”.  And I have to concur: this is heaven especially when I discovered the leftover Tian created a second meal the next day.