HELPING FAMILY FARMS FLOURISH. HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY.

Thursday, January 3, 2013

David Tanis' Twice-Cooked Duck with Pea Shoots



David Tanis 
         I wasn’t familiar with David Tanis at all until he started writing the City Kitchen column in Wednesday’s Dining Section in the Times. Clearly, I’d been missing a lot.  While David’s recipes have often peaked my interest, this is the first one I’ve tried.  And what an introduction!  This is a stir-fry with a twist.  The duck used in the dish is first braised in an Asian inflected broth.  Then the meat is cut up and crisped in oil before being joined in the pan by a blizzard of Asian flavors—ginger and orange, garlic, cumin, and hot peppers. The sauce and the broth from the braise bring it all together.  And finally, pea shoots, a vegetable I’d never used before, are tossed into the mix where they wilt and bring an rich earthy quality to the finished dish. It’s sweet and spicy and satisfying.  It’s one of those dishes that comes with a supreme sense of pride: You’ve made something that tastes so authentic and so good the very first time you’ve cooked it.  So why haven’t I heard of David Tanis before?

Monday, December 31, 2012

Nathalie Dupree's Mississippi Caviar from "Mastering the Art of Southern Cooking"



         Of this year’s cookbooks, “Mastering the Art of Southern Cooking” by Nathalie Dupree and Cynthia Graubert (Gibbs Smith 2012) is at the top of every list of the year’s best.  I’ve already shared the story of my sideways connection to Ms. Dupree in an earlier post: http://www.chewingthefat.us.com/2012/11/skillet-lemon-chicken-with-spinach-and.html. I’ve barely skimmed the surface of this fascinating book and it’s 600 plus recipes.  Now, with New Year’s Day approaching, I want to share another of Nathalie’s recipes, which is particularly timely.  And I hope it has the intended consequence. Because in the South, it's a hard and fast rule that eating black-eyed peas at New Year’s, the basis for Mississippi Caviar, will bring good luck and prosperity for all of next year!  So here’s our New Year’s gift to you!   And if you’re wondering how the humble black-eyed pea rose to such exalted status, you may be very surprised at the answer.