HELPING FAMILY FARMS FLOURISH. HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY.

Friday, April 5, 2013

Cazuelas de Atun y Farfalle from Grace Parisi in Food and Wine Magazine



         What’s in a name?  Plenty.  Today’s dish is an homage to Spain which may not need much homage as it has firmly planted itself on the New York restaurant scene.  I count no fewer than 42 tapas restaurants in Manhattan alone on http://spanishtapasnyc.com/. But if you want something really Spanish, I suggest you head there. Because this dish has its roots firmly planted in the US of A.  It was a mainstay in many a household when I was growing up.  It was prized for its simplicity and the speed with which it could appear on the dinner table. So if Spanish isn’t your strong suit, here’s the translation: Tuna Noodle Casserole.  But would you have stopped to read a post about Tuna Noodle Casserole?  I didn’t think so. 

Thursday, April 4, 2013

A Revelation: A Roast Beef that's almost Filet-tender at about 1/5 the cost. And it cooks with almost no effort at all.



         This one of those food discoveries like tasting Burrata for the first time and wondering if you’ll ever go back to regular Mozzarella. Or the discovery of Balsamic Vinegar and using it on everything from strawberries to chicken breasts.  It’s that earth shaking.  You take one of the least expensive cuts of roast beef – an top or bottom or eye round – you blast it with heat in a 500 degree oven for five minutes a pound then turn the oven off completely.  Two hours later, you pull out an absolutely perfect rare to medium rare roast, so tender it rivals a filet mignon.

Monday, April 1, 2013

Sichuan Stir-Fried Pork in Garlic Sauce from Cook's Illustrated Magazine



Sichuan Province, Land of Plenty
         In one of their masterpieces of science and cooking combined, Cook’s Illustrated chose to take on one of my favorite Chinese Restaurant dishes: Sichuan Stir-Fried Pork in Garlic Sauce.  Sichuan cooking is immediately associated with hot and spicy flavors. The odd thing is that these flavors are relatively new. And initially at least, they were only popular among the poorer segments of Sichuan society.  There was so much else available. Sichuan Province is known as a land of plenty. While landlocked and therefore without seafood, it has an abundance of pigs, poultry, beef cattle, freshwater fish and crayfish.  And it’s been known for its masterful cuisine for hundreds of years.  The first Sichuan restaurant opened in what is now called Hangzhou, its capital city, over 800 years ago.