HELPING FAMILY FARMS FLOURISH. HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY.

Thursday, August 29, 2013

Lobster Cobb Salad with Buttermilk Basil Dressing


         
       

My first Cobb Salad was the first of many I ate on the terrace of the Polo Lounge in the Beverly Hills Hotel.  It was irresistible with its mosaic of ingredients that arrived at the table beautifully arranged on the plate.  The tomatoes glistened, there was crisp bacon, diced chicken breast, hard cooked eggs, beautiful Roquefort blue cheese and of course, this being California, a diced avocado.  The lettuce – a mix of iceberg, watercress, endive and romaine – was finely chopped—something I’d never seen before.  The waiter would toss all these ingredients together and dress the salad with a French dressing.  It was so perfectly Californian and almost as sunny.   Devotees of the salad can thank the Hotel for keeping the recipe alive because its birthplace, a Hollywood shrine if there ever was one, closed years ago.

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Savory Roasted Tomato Tarte Tatin


         I recently came across a very detailed recipe for a tomato Tarte Tatin in August’s Bon Appetit.  Now I used to make Tarte Tatins at every opportunity.  They were hard to beat: You put butter and sugar into a cast iron pan and it magically turned into caramel.  You added pears or apples skin side down, covered the thing with pastry and into the oven it went.  Once done, you cautiously fiipped the tart over and voila!  Your pretty pears or apples glistened on a bed of pastry.  Add a scoop of ice cream and you had a dessert that even I could make.  This was of course before Andrew took up baking. Now, if I made dessert, people would be convinced that I’d lost my mind.  But I couldn’t get the Tomato Tarte Tatin out of my mind. 

Monday, August 26, 2013

Scallop Saltimbocca with Golden Delicious Apples


        When I lived in Rome, Saltimbocca was an introduction to the cuisine of the city itself.   “Saltimbocca alla Romana” featured veal, topped with Prosciutto and Sage in a Marsala and butter sauce.   It was very good and, because of its ingredients, more expensive than most entrees at the trattorias where we ate as students.  It was, therefore, a treat reserved for the days right after our allowances arrived from home.  
       Saltimbocca means “jump in the mouth” although I could never figure out if that was because the taste ‘jumped’ in your mouth or because the dish was so delicious, you literally couldn’t wait to eat it.  Either way, I love Saltimbocca.  So the other day, when I was looking for something quick and easy to cook, I gravitated to a Tyler Florence recipe (again) that featured Scallops, instead of veal, and a lemon, olive oil and butter sauce in lieu of the Marsala and butter sauce of my student days.  It is well worth repeating here.