HELPING FAMILY FARMS FLOURISH. HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY.

Thursday, May 8, 2014

Chewy Almond Macaroons --Gluten and Dairy Free! From Saveur Magazine and Yewande Komolafe


Photo Copywright: Saveur Magazine/Bonnier Publications 
        

One of the joys of the Internet, is the arrival, almost daily, of recipes from my favorite Food magazines, one of which is Saveur. A few weeks ago, a recipe for Macaroons landed in my email box.  I sent it on to Andrew and the next weekend he made a batch.  They were moist, and chewy and deeply, richly almond-y.  They were also completely gluten-free containing not even a dusting of flour.  And they were also dairy-free—there’s not so much as a smidgen of butter in them. I don’t go out of my way to zero in on gluten-free recipes but maybe I should.  My friend Hugh informed me that he’s lost 27 lbs. since he went on a gluten-free diet.  So there are clearly benefits for those omnivores among us with no gluten allergies at all.

Monday, May 5, 2014

Enchiladas Suizas with Mexican Cole Slaw



The Battle of Puebla
       Once again we're celebrating Cinco de Mayo with a tried and true favorite.  This post is the # 2 most viewed page in all of Chewing the Fat's history.   This sensational recipe for Enchiladas is hundreds of page views ahead of # 3.  The second recipe on the page, the one for Mexican Cole Slaw, is certainly reason too for its popularity.  Our records show hundreds of searches for the dish that have wound up on these pages.  So with Cinco de Mayo today, I wanted to share these two great dishes and wish you "Feliz Cinco de Mayo". And I wanted to share a little of the fiesta's history with you.  So here goes:  
      Cinco de Mayo, the celebration of all things Mexican, isn’t really celebrated in Mexico.  It is true that it commemorates the defeat by the Mexican Army of French troops in the Battle of Puebla on May 5th 1862.  However, only the state of Puebla shares the party spirit that is such a part of Cinco de Mayo in the US.   The rest of Mexico waits until September 15th to celebrate their Independence Day.  So how did Cinco de Mayo get to be an American tradition?  Apparently the holiday was created spontaneously by Mexicans and Latinos living in California during the American Civil War.  They supported the fragile cause of defending freedom and democracy by celebrating the unlikely victory by a Mexican Army over the greater fire power of France.   Who knew?