HELPING FAMILY FARMS FLOURISH. HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY.

Thursday, October 30, 2014

Sheila Lukins' Roast Beef and Vegetable Hash


Today is Chewing the Fat's 5th Birthday!  Five years ago this very day we published our very first post!  We've been hard at it ever since.  Now, 526 posts and over 900,000 (!) page views later, we are celebrating this milestone with a request: Will you please go to the bottom of this page and tell us what you'd like to see more of, what you'd like to hear less of, and what we can do to make you want to come back time after time.  We really appreciated your viewership and we'd really appreciate hearing from you!  Happy Birthday! 
         It may come as a huge surprise to you, as it did to me, to know that the #1 most viewed recipe on Chewing the Fat is one for James Beard’s Roast Beef Hash.  (See http://www.chewingthefat.us.com/2012/01/james-beards-roast-beef-hash.html) With 16,439 page views, this recipe continues to be searched for on a daily basis.  To me this says three things: 1. Great recipes never die with the Chef who created them. 2.  There is clearly an extraordinary amount of leftover roast beef in this county at any given moment. 3. And despite the fact that the finished dish is almost impossible to photograph looking appetizing, its looks are no barrier to its popularity.        


With such a huge success on our hands, you’d think I would have abandoned any thought of trying to find another hash recipe at all.  However, I considered it a challenge to try to top or at least equal James Beard’s version.  That and the fact I too had a lot of roast beef leftover from a Prime Rib. Besides, Andrew positively loves hash.  Then I found a recipe from the late, great Sheila Lukins and gave it a go. The results were another hash that was in many ways as good as Beard’s and, with its colorful vegetables, a good deal more photogenic.

Monday, October 27, 2014

Bourbon Chicken

        

The other day I was on the lookout for something quick to cook, which Chinese food almost always is. I like cooking Chinese food at home.  You can keep the notoriously high fat counts down and never worry for a moment whether your food contains MSG.  I came across a recipe for Bourbon Chicken.  The first thing I noted was that there was no bourbon in Bourbon Chicken.  Then I read the recipe sharer’s note stating that a Chinese cook working in a restaurant on New Orleans’ Bourbon Street developed the original recipe.  I took that at face value and proceeded to cook the dish. It really is one of those sweet and spicy stir- fries that I find addictive. They turn an ingredient as inexpensive and mundane as skinless chicken into something exotic and, in this case, truly worth making and eating.   And besides who wouldn’t want to try a recipe that had received no less that 2800 reviews on www.food.com, which is where I found it.  Having enjoyed it so much and wanting to pass it on, I went back to find out all I could about that Chinese Chef on Bourbon Street.