HELPING FAMILY FARMS FLOURISH. HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY.

Thursday, February 11, 2016

Cooking School 101: Making a perfect Milanese. And a Fennel Bacon and Apple Salad to serve with it.




 
Chile's Chicken Valdostana
 “Milanese” is god’s gift to people who love fried food but are afraid to admit it.  This easy-to-conquer technique coats meat with crunchy, crispy bread-crumbs. The meat is dipped in flour, then in egg and finally in breadcrumbs.  Originally, I tasted it as a “Cotaletta di Vitello alla Milanese”, a restaurant favorite Veal chop that eventually became so expensive; I shifted over to Pork Chops.   In Argentina, I sampled the dish with beef, its most popular form there. In Chile, a version called “Valdostana” adds melted cheese and a slice of ham. And despite everything Austrians tell you, Wiener Schnitzel, their national dish, is a variation of Milanese.

Monday, February 8, 2016

One-Pot Thai Curry Rice with Pork adapted from Molly Yeh

-->

Molly Yeh


         More often than not, my inclination is to try any recipe that appeals to me that week. So it was with this warming dish of coconut-scented rice,  curried pork, crisp vegetables, a splash of lime juice and the crunch of peanuts. A recent issue of Food and Wine introduced me to a blogger who lives in the far reaches of northern Minnesota hard by the border of North Dakota.  Given her location, it makes all the sense in the world that she’d would be making Thai Food, doesn’t it?  In a sense it does. This is American food today. We are unrestricted by geography, our population and our supermarkets more and more diverse.  And nothing says that better than the popularity and continuing story of Molly Yeh of East Grand Forks, Minnesota, the blogger in question.  Originally from Brooklyn, Molly Yeh has embraced her new home with a vengeance.  But she certainly brought a lot of Brooklyn with her.  The first of her recipes is for Halvah-Stuffed Challah bread. But what she must truly pine for is New York’s Thai Food. So she has created a version of it using a technique that is pure Midwestern.