HELPING FAMILY FARMS FLOURISH. HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY.

Thursday, March 23, 2017

Come take a trip to Umbria and bring back a recipe from one of their great Cooking Teachers

 

Letizia Mattiacci: The Umbrian Cook on an American Tour

Staff Writer
Learn how to cook the cuisine of this Italian province from a native cook and teacher. Then you can make dishes like this gorgeous Melanzane alla Parmigiana...Eggplant Parmigiano

umbria valley park

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Experience Umbrian cuisine first hand on Letizia Mattiacci's U.S. tour. 


Umbria — the Italian province sandwiched between Tuscany, Le Marche, and Lazio in what is called Italy’s Cuore Verde, its ‘green heart’ — is the home of some of Italy’s finest fare. Its green-gold olive oil, red wines, and particularly its cured meats, salumi, are prized throughout the country. But outside of Italy, the richness of its cuisine is hardly known. This is slowly changing, as many have been singing the praises of this province, home to the historic towns of Perugia and Assisi. And Letizia Mattiacci is one of the leading lights in this new movement.

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Where to stay in La Serenissima...my Venice post from The Daily Meal

By
Monte Mathews
Staff Writer 

This private island retreat makes the perfect base for exploring Venice
 
Ask anyone who has been to Venice lately and you’re sure to hear that “La Serenissima” is hardly serene. Every year 22 million tourists flock to the city, an average of 60,000 people a day. Around 9 o’clock each morning, throngs of tourist groups arrive from the mainland and the Lido (the barrier island that helps divide the Venetian Lagoon from the Adriatic Sea), clogging Piazza San Marco and every inch around it. Miraculously, at 5 o’clock the city is practically deserted as the tour groups leave en masse. But there is a way to avoid the mobs and enjoy every minute of being in Venice.

Monday, March 20, 2017

Homemade Pad Thai from Cook's Illustrated Magazine and Memories of my Mother




Before I lunge into how to make a truly satisfying and remarkably authentic Pad Thai in whatever kitchen you call home, I must pause in memory of my mother.   Because ringing in my ears as I made this surprisingly easy version of the classic rice noodle, shrimp and scrambled egg dish, were my mother’s words: “What on earth would possess you to make Pad Thai when there’s a perfectly good Asian place a block and a half from your house.  And they deliver.”   My mother certainly would not have. But then again, my mother hated cooking.  I mean hated it.