HELPING FAMILY FARMS FLOURISH. HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY.
Showing posts with label 30 Minute Meals. Show all posts
Showing posts with label 30 Minute Meals. Show all posts

Monday, January 13, 2014

Herb-Crusted Cod with Lemon-Dill Beurre Blanc Sauce

       
What’s wonderful about this dish is that its name alone sounds as if you’ve gone to an inordinate amount of trouble making it.  In reality, it’s one of the easiest things on earth to get on the table.  This recipe is as close as I could come to a dish that’s an all-time favorite at Sag Harbor’s “Dockside” restaurant.  Now “Dockside” at 26 Bay Street (Tel: 631-725-7100) is an anomaly. It’s situated in one half of the American Legion Hall. Dockside’s bar is decorated with the crests of the service branches the Legion represents.  Believe it or not, there’s a dearth of places in the Hamptons with water views.  While Dockside is not port side, it is right across the road from the yachts and sailboats moored and docked at the Sag Harbor Yacht Club.  It has an outdoor
terrace that’s a wonderful place for lunch on a sunny day. And for small town Americana, what could beat the Sag Harbor Community Band’s Tuesday night concerts?  These are held directly in front of the Legion every Tuesday in July and August. If you’ve lucky enough to snag a table at Dockside, which does not take reservations, you’ll be serenaded with rousing music in the style of John Phillip Sousa. “Dockside” is a second generation restaurant owned by Stacy Sheehan’s father before Stacy took over and transformed the place from a hamburger joint into a really great place to eat wonderful local food.  Among the offerings is a version of Herb-Crusted Cod with Lemon Beurre Blanc.  Now that Dockside has closed down for the season and won’t reopen until February 13 th, I couldn’t wait to make this at home.  But first, of course, I had to check on the cod.

Thursday, December 5, 2013

Diver Scallops with Monte's Ham Original Glaze and a Special Holiday Offer to You.



        
As you know, I own a ham company that makes an all-natural ham that I am extremely proud of.  And along with the ham comes the glaze that I created years ago when I baked my first ham.  Monte’s Ham Original Glaze is a luscious mixture of real Dijon Mustard, Organic Brown Sugar and Seville Orange Marmalade along with a top-secret spice blend.  For all of those who, no matter what the reason, cannot, will not or do not eat Ham, I’d highly recommend the glaze. And if you stick with me, there’s a special offer at the end of this post that I hope will tempt you to try it.  The glaze is terrific on carrots, great on salmon or ribs and a must-have with my ham.  It also turned out to be a terrific pairing with some large Diver Scallops I saw in the market. And it took so little time to prepare, it qualifies as an ideal under 30 minute weeknight meal. 

Monday, December 2, 2013

Spicy (Rotisserie) Chicken Soup from Bon Appetit



         Let’s face it: this time of year begs for recipes that you can get on the table in no time. This wonderful soup takes all of 15 minutes to make and it’s a perfect warmer for a winter night.  With a tossed green salad and some crusty French bread, it’s an ideal supper any day of the week.  Leave out the bread, and it's a gluten-free dinner!  The timesaver here is, of course, the rotisserie chicken.  I find the ones at Costco irresistible.  At under $5.00, they’re a bargain that’s as tasty as any home made chicken.  And there’s a lot of meat on these birds—so much so that you may find the quantity of chicken in the original Bon Appetit recipe, 4 cups, is happily met by using just the breasts.  The rest of the chicken can sit in the fridge and used for chicken sandwiches for lunch.  You can use any kind of mushrooms but shiitakes and creminis will up the flavor more than white button mushrooms.  The ginger slices ramp up the taste. If you’re not mad for spice, keep tasting as you add the cayenne pepper, it’s what gives the soup its name.  A word to the wise about the spinach:  Put a half cup of baby spinach leaves in the bottom of each soup bowl and pour the hot soup over it.  It will cook right up in the bowl and add a jolt of green to the proceedings.  Here’s the recipe:

Friday, June 28, 2013

Asparagus with Lardons, a Fried Egg and Zen-sational Seasoning


         A few weeks ago, I told you about Pollen Ranch Spices (http://www.pollenranch.com), a remarkable company in the picturesquely named town of Lemon Cove, California.   My initial introduction to the company was their Fennel Pollen, a key ingredient in a recipe for Porchetta that I posted on Chewing the Fat.  Here’s the link: http://www.chewingthefat.us.com/2010/07/porchetta-slow-roasted-pork-shoulder.html.  Along with the hand collected organic fennel pollen, came a second tin of something called “Zen-sational”.  Pollen Ranch calls it ‘your secret ingredient'.  It’s a secret I’d latch on to if I were you.  It gave this simple Asparagus dish a great new taste. And exactly what is “Zen-sational”? 

Monday, June 17, 2013

Pork and Portobello Burgers from Mark Bittman in the New York Times



         
         
Mark Bittman
Flexitarian
Mark Bittman is one of the most thoughtful of food writers.  He calls himself a Flexitarian, which he defines as a “moderate, conscious eater” whose goals are “a diet that is higher in plants and lower in both animal products and hyper processed foods, the stuff that makes up something like three-quarters of what’s sold in supermarkets.”  The term “Flexitarian” goes back to 2004 when it referred to vegetarians who, while eating mostly vegetables, began incorporating meat or fish.  And it also included people who were moving in the other direction, away from meat-heavy diets into a more vegetarian focused one. Bittman expands that to included whole grains and grains.  I think “Flexitarian” describes exactly what I try to do in our home kitchen. And I think it incorporates ideals that most of our readers try to achieve.  I’ve already taken some further steps in this direction.  I haven’t cut pasta out of our diet but I have changed the amount of it I cook in a single meal.  We are down to the equivalent of ¾ cup of dried pasta per serving.  Do we miss it?  Not for a minute. You get more sauce this way.   We also eat meatless meals with some frequency.  Now Bittman makes the point that when you do eat meat, you owe it to yourself, and your conscience to find meat that represents the best of the best in every way: From the way the animals are raised, to what they are fed and how they are brought to market. It's vital to know where your food comes from.  In this case, national brands like Neiman Ranch may be twice as expensive as supermarket pork, but by cutting back portion size, you may find them equal in cost and un-equalled in value.  So today’s post, while hardly meatless, cuts way down on the amount of meat per serving.  And what takes its place?

Thursday, April 25, 2013

Vietnamese Shrimp Sliders adapted from Melissa Clark in The New York Times


         

I don't know when sliders took over the world but they're everywhere. And while they may have started out as mini-hamburgers, now you can find them on all kinds of menus, stuffed with everything from Turkey to Texas barbecue.  Let's face it, their size is ideal.  In one or two bites, you get the full-on slider experience.  They're just the right size for children, for whom a full-sized burger is a challenge.  In today's post, they're made with crispy fried shrimp dipped into a salty lime sauce and then tucked into tiny brioche buns that have been slathered with an Asian inflected mayonaise. They're a gift from the inventive Melissa Clark whose Wednesday food column in the New York Times is eagerly awaited in our house. This time, Melissa has gone East for her flavors.

Monday, December 17, 2012

Sticky Chinese Pork Stir-Fry and it's Low Fat too!



         At the risk of sounding like a broken record, the stir-fry is the savior of every harried home cook.  When you have to get dinner on the table in as short a time as possible, a stir-fry’s hard to beat.  It’s all a matter of getting everything prepped and ready to go in this super fast cooking method.   And there’s no need for a wok to do so.  Any large fry pan will do.  There’s endless variety of things you can stir-fry.  This one is my latest discovery and it’s very good.  It’s loaded with vegetables and the most tender pork all bound together in an Asian accented sauce flavored with ginger and garlic. The sauce is the ‘sticky’ part with its hint of honey.  And what’s really impressive is that it’s extremely low fat.  How can you resist?

Monday, September 24, 2012

Chicken, Cashew and Spinach Stir-Fry adapted from Gourmet Magazine



         If I could teach one technique that is perfect for weeknight cooking, it would be the stir-fry.  It is the absolutely ideal last minute dinner when you’re not entirely sure when everyone’s getting home.  You put everything in place in advance.  Then, when whomever you are cooking for arrives at the door, you’re ready to have dinner on the table in moments.  In the case of this Asian inspired version of a stir-fry, the cooking time adds up to all of 12 minutes max. That’s kind of hard to beat.  And hard to beat too are the flavors and textures of this dish. The tender chicken, the crunch of the cashews and red pepper, a hint of spice from the red pepper flakes, the green of the spinach—they all come together in a silken sauce that’s better than any Chinese take-out. Come to think of it, if you ordered Chinese, it would probably take longer to get to you than this dinner does. You’ll notice that I served this dish without any sides.  The obvious choice would be a bed of fluffy white rice. But we sometimes skip the carbs and then of course, there’s the matter of Arsenic in Rice.

Tuesday, September 4, 2012

Asian Pork in Lettuce Wraps from Chef Ryan Lowder



         Alright, I cheated little on this one.  The actual recipe is for something called “Pork Larb” but, when I first said that I was going to make a dish by that name, Andrew made a face and suggested that, for appetite appeal alone, I should change it.  Because there are so many things to recommend it, I am doing just that.  This sweet and salty, sour and spicy warm meat salad is the national dish of Laos.   There’s also a variation of the dish made in Northern Thailand.  This version seems to straddle the border.  It comes together in all of 25 minutes.  And the ease with which it’s made is matched by the fun of eating it.  You put the bowl containing the pork in the center of the table.  Next to it goes the refreshing dipping sauce and a platter of vivid green Boston or Butter Lettuce leaves.  Then everyone around the table just digs in.  And where did this recipe come from?  Salt Lake City, of course.

Thursday, May 3, 2012

Pork Cutlets with Pine Nuts and Prosciutto “Lombatine ‘Vestite’ ai Pinoli”


         Here we have a simple pork cutlet or chop that is covered with juicy bits of golden raisin, salty, tangy capers, and rich Gran Padano cheese.   This sweet and salty, cheese-y topping is held in place by crisp slices of prosciutto.  For a pork lover like me, the dish is just about perfection.
         I’ve mentioned my fondness for “La Cucina Italiana” magazine before.  The 83 year old magazine got its start in Italy in 1929.  The US edition is a Johnny-come-lately by comparison.  It launched here late in 2007.  The magazine has an American editor named Michael Wilson who somehow makes every issue like a trip to Italy. And it maintains its Italian-ness by keeping the recipe titles in Italian and translating them in much smaller type below.  Somehow that adds to the feeling that this is truly Italian cooking.  Features about various regions of Italy make for a good read.  Ingredient features like the current issue’s one on Italian Beer introduce you to the people behind the brews.  And two more, one on beans, the other on strawberries, give you more than enough ways to put authentic recipes on your table. This "La Cucina" even takes you outside the kitchen door with “Start an Italian Garden”. But hands down, one of my favorite sections is called “In Cucina” (In the Kitchen).  That’s where you’ll find “Cooking School” which gives you an in-depth understanding of cooking techniques.  But it’s “Cooking by the Clock” that inevitably turns me on.  Today’s post is no exception. 

Monday, March 19, 2012

Sotanghon with Chicken and Wood Ear Mushrooms



         One of the great joys of cooking has to be the amazing things you learn when you use an ingredient that is new to you.  In this case, our dear friend Richard arrived from Hong Kong recently and presented us with a sealed plastic bag of Wood Ear or Tree Ear dried mushrooms.  He brought us so many, he could have used the bag as a neck pillow on his long flight from China.  They were intriguing--almost white on one side and then practically black on the other.   While I marveled at the sight of them, I couldn’t help wonder why Richard had appeared with this very bulky gift.  Turns out, Richard, an avid Chewing the Fat reader, remembered something I wrote in November 2010 in a post about Shun Lee West, our neighborhood Chinese restaurant.  http://www.chewingthefat.us.com/2010/11/long-ago-visit-to-shun-lee-and-my-take.html is where you’ll find the post.  But what was missing from the recipe for Shun Lee’s Sichuan Shrimp were, you guessed it, Wood Ear or Tree Tea mushrooms.

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Parmesan Crusted Rack of Lamb



New Zealand where there are
9.2 sheep for every human
         I’d be hard pressed to remember the last I cooked something this impressive and yet so easy.  I must admit to having approached preparing rack of lamb with a degree of trepidation.  This dish is restaurant territory to me and I associate it with a hefty price tag on menus everywhere.  Truth be told, while not inexpensive, the lamb for 2 was about $18.00. Bless the people of New Zealand for this relative bargain. And bless whoever ‘frenches’ these racks because they involve no trimming at all and can go straight into the pan.  New Zealand lamb accounts for almost 1/3 of all lamb eaten in the US. Australia is by far and away the biggest producer of lamb, responsible for 2/3 of all the lamb imported into this country.  While researching this piece, I was quite surprised to discover lamb is very good for you. Who knew that Lamb is a significant source of omega-3, containing about 50 % the amount found in cod or tuna on an ounce-for-ounce basis ?  Or that lamb contains something called CLA (conjugated linoleic acid), that protects the heart?  And it’s a very good source of immunity boosting protein, heart-healthy vitamin B 12 and niacin. Lamb is even listed as one of the World’s Healthiest Foods.  And we haven’t even gotten to how delicious it tastes.