HELPING FAMILY FARMS FLOURISH. HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY.
Showing posts with label Beef Dishes. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Beef Dishes. Show all posts

Thursday, July 3, 2014

Smoked Prime Rib on the Grill, Roasted Tomatoes with Pesto and Tortini of Zucchini





       
The lovely and extremely
talented Elizabeth Karmel
T
he 4th of July is upon us and there's never a better time to fire up the grill and celebrate the joy of being an American.  And there's almost nothing more American than beef.  And today I am talking serious beef, not your hamburgers and sliders but a big beautiful rib roast.  And what could be more 4th of July than cooking this King of all Roasts on the grill. So today I repeat a post from our first year: It's a menu that celebrates the holiday with the beef served with some incredibly flavorful tomatoes and a zucchini recipe that turns every plate into a piece of art. What's exciting to me is that since I first wrote this post, I came to know the author of the Prime Rib recipe, Hill Country Barbecue's Executive Chef, Elizabeth Karmel.  Elizabeth may well be familiar to those of you who watch Chopped Chef where she's been regularly pressed into service as a judge.  It turns out that Elizabeth grew up with a great friend of ours. David has had the good sense to invite Elizabeth to the Hamptons for the weekend and with her arrival, his dinner parties have topped our list of most-appreciated invitations.  Her pimento cheese, her 7 layer salads and her artichoke and spinach dip are all ambrosial.  But even before I met Elizabeth, I fell in love with her grilled Prime Rib.
       Regular readers of Chewing the Fat have heard that I do not run outdoors on the first decent day and fire up the grill.  I have the grill pans to prove it.  As a matter of fact, it sometimes takes me a little while to bring the grill up to the deck from its winter storage place in the garage.  This is fundamentally because I do not feel in complete control of the Weber.  And to me, gas is out of the question because if you’re going to use a grill, surely half of the desired result is some smoky flavor to announce where whatever you’ve cooked has come from. But not too long ago, we were having quite a big group for dinner and I wanted to serve Prime Rib. 

Monday, June 16, 2014

Short Ribs in a Cinnamon and Red Wine Sauce: An East Indian take on a North American Classic


           
          This was one of the first posts I published back in 2010 when I started to blog.  Because my readership was nowhere near what it is now, I should not have been as surprised as I was to see that it never really attracted a big audience. That struck me as a shame because it is a spectacularly interesting take by a master of Indian cooking who invented one of the most unique cooking styles anywhere--a fusion between Indian inflected spices and great Canadian ingredients--in this case the country's phenomenal grass fed beef.  As to its seasonality, I say it would be as good in July as it would be in January.  After all, it's a variation on that summer staple--Ribs.  What makes it a particularly attractive take on Ribs is that it doesn't require firing up a grill.  Instead it cooks away in the oven for hours.   So here, a reprise of something awfully good that I hope will get the attention it deserves.
          If you’ve had any luck in life, you’ve had the good fortune to visit Vancouver, British Columbia. It’s a city that’s got it all. They say in winter you can sail and ski on the same day. Surrounded by water and a little over an hour from the slopes at Whistler, that sounds highly possible. Yes, it has that Pacific Northwest climate with a few more rainy days than I’d find ideal, but it’s blessedly warmer than the rest of Canada in winter and temperate all summer. And Vancouver is a foodie’s delight. In fact, Mimi Sheraton thinks the best Asian cuisine in North America is found there. I’d add that the best South Asian food in Vancouver is served at Vij’s, Vikram VijDescription: http://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=52246-20&l=btl&camp=213689&creative=392969&o=1&a=1553651847’s no reservation restaurant at 1480 West 11th Street in the South Granville area of the city. And I wouldn’t be alone. The New York Times called Vij’s “Easily among the finest Indian restaurants in the world.” 

Friday, November 29, 2013

Monte's Bourbon Chili



         This perfect day-after Thanksgiving recipe first made its appearance here last year.  The thermometer has been flirting with very cold temperatures in the East this weekend.  This morning it was 20 degrees. As it looks like it is going to stay cold this weekend, big bowls of chili make all the sense in the world.  This recipe is no all-day affair. You will be in and out of the kitchen in a half hour.  Then the pot sits on the stove for another hour. You can easily double or triple the recipe so you can make a big batch this weekend and then ladle it out all next week.  When I came across a recipe for Bourbon Chili, I was intrigued.  But the original recipe included the cardinal sin that true chili makers just won’t stand for.  The thing was chock-a-block full of beans—back beans and garbanzo beans.  Now if you’ve ever looked at my previous chili recipe http://www.chewingthefat.us.com/2011/12/texas-beef-brisket-chili-with-butternut.html, you may remember the phrase “If you know beans about chili, you know chili has no beans.”  So I set out to make a bowl of Bourbon Chili minus the beans.

Thursday, October 31, 2013

Jamie Oliver's Beef and Guinness Pie


 
It's not exactly freezing but it the time of year when I start thinking about meals that, for lack of a better word are 'manly'.  I would happily make this recipe a Steak and Kidney Pie although that would quickly mean that most of it ended up un-eaten.  But this  wonderfully robust pie is something I wrote about in a very early entry on this blog.  Well over 3500 people have visited this recipe.  The very lucky few have tasted this savory pie, a rich melange of meat and mushrooms and cheese left to be uncovered when the puff pastry topping is lifted.  And it's from a Chef I admire as much for  his caring as I do for his cooking.

Monday, April 15, 2013

The Perfect Patty Melt and it's most imperfect imitator, "The Midtown Melt"



        
Last week, I had the strongest craving for a Patty Melt.  I confess that the Patty Melt is far and away my absolute favorite chopped meat sandwich. You must never call a Patty Melt a hamburger because to purists, the Patty Melt is emphatically not one.  To those afficianados like me, it has just four non-negotiable elements that set it apart from any hamburger or cheeseburger: A beef patty, rye bread, sautéed onions and Swiss cheese.  There can be no deviation from this ingredient list.  Furthermore, the patty must be oval to match the shape of the rye bread. The rye bread must be griddled, never toasted.  The onions must be sliced very thin and cooked until caramelized.  The cheese offers a little flexibility: it can be Swiss or Gruyere or a mixture of the two, grated or sliced.   What emerges from this recipe is decadently rich; the cheese permeating the bread and meat and that crisp, buttered rye bread is essential to the character of the dish, its aroma inextricably linked to the pleasure of the Patty Melt.  It’s completely decadent, there’s no denying it.  And there’s also no denying that I tried to resist it all last week.  I even went vegan.

Thursday, April 4, 2013

A Revelation: A Roast Beef that's almost Filet-tender at about 1/5 the cost. And it cooks with almost no effort at all.



         This one of those food discoveries like tasting Burrata for the first time and wondering if you’ll ever go back to regular Mozzarella. Or the discovery of Balsamic Vinegar and using it on everything from strawberries to chicken breasts.  It’s that earth shaking.  You take one of the least expensive cuts of roast beef – an top or bottom or eye round – you blast it with heat in a 500 degree oven for five minutes a pound then turn the oven off completely.  Two hours later, you pull out an absolutely perfect rare to medium rare roast, so tender it rivals a filet mignon.

Monday, March 4, 2013

Brussels Sprouts and Steak Stir Fry from Bon Appetit


         Confession time: I used to loathe Brussels Sprouts. When I was growing up, I even made up a story to explain the Brussels Sprout.  It was, I told myself, a vegetable forced on wartime Europe.  I reasoned this lowly member of the cabbage family was so undesirable, it escaped the ration book.   What it was doing in post-World War II Canada was beyond all understanding.  My attitude towards Brussels Sprouts remained unchanged until only recently.  Two things  changed my mind.  The first was the Brussels Sprouts my cooking pals like Keith and Jeff served recently were not just palatable, they were downright good. And I would likely make a special trip out to the beach to dive into Almond Restaurants' "Brussels Sprouts Two Ways".  The second was that when searching for local late season produce, our Hamptons farm stands are positively rife with Brussels Sprouts.  Of course, the farm stands have long been closed for the season.  But the Brussels Sprouts are green and glorious in the supermarket—even if they hail from much further than Bridgehampton.  And when I was doing some research into the Brussels Sprout, I discovered why those Canadian Brussels Sprouts of long ago weren’t at all what I was raving about today. 

Thursday, February 7, 2013

Flank Steak Diane and how I fell in love with New York


Flank Steak Diane, Photo by Fine Cooking Magazine 

         Beef prices have escalated this year to the point where a perfectly ordinary New York Strip is 15.99 a lb.  Filet Mignon? 29.99. Last week, I even noted that our favorite neighborhood bistro's Steak Frites has diminished in size and risen $4.00 in price.  So when Fine Cooking’s February/ March issue arrived, I was excited to see a recipe for Steak Diane that used the humble flank steak. It just so happens that flank steak is on special this week at Fresh Direct for 5.99 a lb.  Now I have a special connection to Steak Diane.  It goes way back to my first visit to New York.  Bear with me and I’ll get to that story in its entirety. First, Fine Cooking’s budget friendly recipe. 

Thursday, January 24, 2013

Burgundy Beef Stew adapted from Saveur's "New Comfort Food"


Confession Time:  Those vegetables that look like potatoes?
They are potatoes served alongside the dish the night before.
Since I didn't get a photograph then, this picture was taken the next day
with the leftovers potatoes added to the stew.


         When we entertain, I love to do things that will keep me out of the kitchen once the guests have arrived.  And in winter, a great braise is a perfect way to do it.  And if you’re choosing a great beef dish, Boeuf Bourguignon is an obvious choice.  However, who can forget Julie and Julia, the movie where the young blogger cooks her way through Julia Child’s Mastering the Art of French Cooking?  In case you have forgotten, Julie was doing fine until the day she arrived at Julia’s recipe for Beef Bourguignon.   There she failed miserably. I am not entirely sure of the details but Julie fell asleep and the stew went awry.  As ridiculous as it sounds, that scared me off Julia’s recipe. Instead, I pulled out Saveur’s “The New Comfort Food. Home Cooking from around the World” (Chronicle Books 2011). I have used this cookbook with great success. In fact, I find Saveur and James Oseland, editor of both this book and the magazine, are completely trustworthy where recipes are concerned.  This recipe was listed as “Burgundy-Style Beef Stew”.  There’s not necessarily a lot different about it from the recipe for Boeuf Bourguignon.  At least there wasn’t until I started fiddling with it.

Thursday, October 11, 2012

Indian Pot Roast from Whole Foods Market


  
         If you are thinking “native American”, this recipe probably wouldn’t raise an eyebrow.  But we’ve long since stopped calling Native Americans “Indians”.  No, the name of this dish refers to the Asian sub-continent of India.  And that may be even more surprising.  The cow is considered sacred by most Hindus.  That makes beef taboo in all but two Indian states: Goa on the west coast and Kerala at the southern tip of India.  There you will find it sold in restaurants.  But in the rest of India, you’ll have to seek out international restaurants catering to Western customers who simply can’t live without their beef. 
Sacred Cow in front of McDonald's...
never inside!
Behold the Maharaja Mac
Where, I wondered, does that leave McDonald’s? There are over 250 McDonald’s in 12 Indian cities and not one Big Mac to be found in any of them.  Instead the offerings are limited to the McVeggie—bread, peas, carrots, potatoes, Indian spices, lettuce and Mayo on a sesame seed bun. The McChicken is self explanatory. The Filet o Fish sounds exactly like the one at home.  And what is the Big Mac equivalent?  Two browned chicken breasts, onions, lettuce, tomatoes and cheese on “ Sesame bedecked bread buns”.  Top of the line, it’s called the Chicken Maharaja-Mac. And it costs just 60 rupees. That’s 1.30 cents. So what’s with Whole Foods “Indian Pot Roast”?

Monday, June 18, 2012

Out of Africa: Two Marcus Samuelsson recipes: Bobotie with Mango Sambal



The Cape of Good Hope,
the very tip of Africa
         In my past life I was fortunate to travel to six continents for work.  And of all the places I’ve been, South Africa is at the top of my list for sheer physical beauty.  Being a lifelong geography fanatic, I cannot describe how exciting it was to stand at the Cape of Good Hope, the very tip of the African continent, the Atlantic on one side and the Indian Ocean on the other.  Capetown, where we were based, is a magnificent ocean front city topped off by the ever present Table Mountain. The food was not terribly memorable mostly because we were taken to restaurants that cater to European palates.  The only dish I will never forget is the national dish of South Africa, Bobotie. This wonderful aromatic mix of ground meat and tomatoes topped with a rich, creamy custard has no season.  It keeps forever in the fridge and as exotic as it sounds, you likely have every spice you need in your spice rack right now.  Add this recipe from one of the world's most fascinating cooks to your summer menu and tell everyone you're taking them to Africa for dinner. 

Monday, April 30, 2012

Steak Pizzaiola


         My friend Kate says that when she lived in Santa Fe NM, people used to refer to their local Whole Foods market as “Whole Paycheck”. The Whole Foods nearest me is certainly more expensive than most of the neighborhood groceries but then the produce is magnificent and almost everything in the store is either organic or close to it.  Then Trader Joe’s moved into the same geographical locale.  Everyone in the area noted the sizeable price differences on very much the same caliber of food. Trader Joe’s features any number of products with a green halo around them. Those that are not completely organic are pretty close to it.  But what price differences!  So it was not entirely a surprise when I went to Whole Foods this week and discovered a whole raft of Sale items.  Among these was Sirloin Steak at 6.99 a lb. marked down, according to the signage, from 12.99 a lb.  The price alone would have instantly attracted me.  But Whole Foods reputation for minimally processed foods is another huge draw. It’s reflected in everything the store does down to the wrapping my sirloin came in which is branded as “Great-Tasting Meat from Healthy Animals.’ Sold!   From there, it was just a matter of how to cook the steak in a new way.  I discovered a recipe for Steak Pizzaiola.

Monday, March 5, 2012

Thomas Keller’s recipe for Santa Maria-style Tri-Tip Roast Beef


Chef Thomas Keller 
         When Trader Joe’s came to our neighborhood, it brought plenty of California with it.  Among the items was something called a Tri-Tip Roast of beef.  I’d never heard of the cut at all but TJ’s meat case is full of the stuff.   Trader Joe’s brands practically everything in the store with its own label.  So you’ll find several pre-marinated versions of the Tri-Tip all attributed to the retailer.  I know I should appreciate the time-saving this gives the harried cook who rushes into the store at the end of the day and has to get dinner on the table the moment he or she gets home. But if, like me, you want to control sodium intake and everything else that goes into processed foods, Trader Joe’s offers a virgin version of the beef.  However I still had no idea what the cut was or, for that matter, how to cook it.  Then I ran across a recipe for Tri-Tip from none other than the great Thomas Keller.

Thursday, February 2, 2012

Asian Spiced Flank Steak With Basmati Rice and Mango Salad


You can serve the steak atop the salad...
Or make the salad all by itself...either way, these dishes are terrific!

         If there is a first for everything, today’s Chewing the Fat qualifies.  The first in this case was my discovery that one of my go-to heroes of the kitchen seriously let me down.  I went to his well-thumbed cookbook.  I found a chicken recipe that had a lot going for it –combining lemons and curry.  It looked relatively easy, involved a quick yogurt marinade and a simple roast in the oven.  It was awful.  A dreadful color, it took ‘tangy’ to a place I couldn’t get away from fast enough.  But lo and behold, what was under the chicken was fantastic! A wonderful rice salad with crunchy cashews, fresh mint, ripe mango and crisp haricots verts folded into fragrant basmati rice was a total winner.  So for the first time ever, I decided to share the salad with you and forget all about the chicken.  What to serve with the rice salad was a no-brainer.  I’ve collected any number of steak recipes and it seemed to me that a recipe for Asian inflected Flank Steak would be a perfect accompaniment to my hero’s terrific rice salad.

Monday, January 16, 2012

Moroccan Beef Meatball Tajine


         My cousin Bubbles and I have a running dialog about what we’re making for dinner.  The other day she mentioned meatballs and then told me that she seldom makes them anymore because she has a friend who, while claiming not to be a cook, makes the most superb rendition of this true comfort food.  I, on the other hand, am a huge fan of these lovely little pillows of meat, almost inevitably encased in a delicious sauce.  I love to try various versions of the meatball using pork or lamb, beef or a combination of ingredients.  However on the night I made this wonderfully aromatic Moroccan dish, I had singled out a package of Organic Beef for use in that night’s dinner.  And you’d be amazed how few recipes call for beef alone.  This one did and it allowed me another indulgence, one I’d been keen to explore.

Thursday, January 5, 2012

James Beard’s Roast Beef Hash


I just wish this looked as good as it tastes
You have just landed on the most popular post ever on Chewing the Fat.  It's been read over 16,000 times and counting.  But before you rush off and cook it, you might want to have a look at another hash recipe that celebrates the Fifth Birthday of Chewing the Fat.  You'll find it here:

Joe Beef's Veal Pojarski
This week, the New York Times’ Dining Section featured a front-page article entitled “Lucky to Be a Leftover”.   In it were some remarkable ideas from people all over who made meatballs from holiday hams (no recipe on that one and boy, did I want it!), to Veal Pojarski, made from diced roasted veal, pork or beef and a specialty of those two Montreal Chefs-of-the-Moment, Joe Beef’s own Dave McMillan and Frederic Morin.  The Montrealers go all the way to sticking a roasted bone in the resultant meatball.  The thing looks phenomenally good.  But to me, the best thing to do with the gorgeous centerpiece from our Christmas Day table, our standing Rib Roast of Beef, is to make Roast Beef Hash.

Thursday, December 8, 2011

Texas Beef Brisket Chili with Butternut Squash


Jesse James
Outlaw and Chili Lover
Every year about this time, we get a blast of cold air that makes us yearn for a big bowl of chili.  I am certainly no Texan and despite the fact that Andrew’s family live there, they’re native New Yorkers.   But I’ll take a bowl of Texas chili over any other kind.  After all, the Texas legislature declared Chili the “State Food” in 1977 “in recognition of the fact that the only real 'bowl of red' is that prepared by Texans."  I wonder what took them so long? It’s reported that Jesse James (1847-1882), outlaw and desperado of the American West, once gave up a chance to rob a bank in McKinney, Texas because his favorite chili parlor was located there.  What distinguishes Texas Chili? Well any Texan worth their cowboy hat knows you don’t know beans about chili if you use beans in making the real thing. There’s even a song on the subject:

Thursday, November 17, 2011

Lillian Hellmann’s Empanadas


Lillian posed for Blackgama Mink
for which she was roundly criticized. 

The late Wendy Wasserstein
         Before you think I am fixated on Lillian Hellmann, Playwright, Author and Memoirist, I feel compelled to admit that you may be right.  Lillian Hellmann’s Pot Roast, which I shared with you earlier this month, opened the door to my reading “An Unfinished Woman” (Little Brown & Co. 1969)  This book was the first in what became a three-volume collection of memoirs.  The version that I read contained an introduction by the playwright; Wendy Wasserstein and I’ve leaned heavily on it to write this post.  Ms. Wasserstein’s tongue-planted-firmly-in-cheek commentary is hilarious.  She points out that in “An Unfinished Woman” Lillian reminisces about virtually every famous person you’ve ever heard of.  But what struck Ms. Wasserstein was the number of times that Lillian encountered these people just days before their demise.

Monday, November 14, 2011

To Montreal again and to Iron Chef Chuck Hughes' newest hit “Le Bremner” plus his incredible recipe for Beef Short Ribs with Cambozola




  
         Andrew and I felt as if we already knew Chuck Hughes before we even arrived at his latest Montreal venue, “Le Bremner”  (361 Rue St. Paul East, Montreal H2Y 1H2 Tel: 514-544-0466 ) in the heart of Old Montreal.  We’d been following Chuck for months on his Cooking Channel Show “Chuck’s Day Off”.  The premise, if you haven’t had the pleasure, is that Chuck, a extremely affable (and extremely attractive) chef invites all manner of people he knows to eat a lunch he’s prepared specifically for them at his other Montreal hot spot, “Le Garde Manger” (408 Rue St. Francois Xavier, Tel:514-687-5044).  We get to watch the cooking. His guests ranging from his fellow amateur Hockey team players to the local firemen to the guy who delivers the linen to the restaurant get to do the eating.  It’s great television cooking because Chuck exudes energy and passion and infuses his cooking with ‘lick the screen’ dishes you salivate over just watching.  To say that Andrew and I both had mancrushes on Chuck would likely be an understatement.  And meeting him up close and personal just sealed the deal.

Thursday, November 3, 2011

Lillian Hellmann’s Pot Roast


With ingredients bordering on White Trash,
this Pot Roast is absolutely delicious
  
When I went to the market last weekend, there was a special on Chuck Roast with a big sticker on it saying “Easy Cooking Instructions for Pot Roast”.  I immediately thought “Lillian Hellmann’s Pot Roast”.  I don’t know whether you’re familiar with Lillian Hellman, an author whose works included “Little Foxes”, likely better remembered as a Bette Davis movie, and “Julia”, a World War II drama which may also be better remembered in its movie version starring Jane Fonda and Vanessa Redgrave.  But I remember Lillian Hellman well.