HELPING FAMILY FARMS FLOURISH. HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY.
Showing posts with label Breakfast Pastry. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Breakfast Pastry. Show all posts

Thursday, June 26, 2014

Martha Stewart's Cornmeal Berry Sheet Cake




 There’s a twitter feed called “Drunk Ina Garten” written by someone as a parody.  And every time I post an Ina Garten piece, the guy who tweets it picks up on it in about five minutes flat, re-tweets it and I get tons of hits from his readers.  Strangely, there doesn’t seem to be one for our other local legend, whom I would have to think, could be subject of more parodies than our Ina.  That local legend is none other than Martha Stewart, whose makes East Hampton one of her four homes all within driving distance of each other—except perhaps the one in Maine which is a private jet away.  I owe a geat deal to Martha and I am not embarrassed to say it.  Here is a woman who almost single-handedly restored the joys of home-making, crafting, entertaining, gardening and housekeeping. I see her influence all over my own house and garden. Despite all I owe Martha, when I occasionally see her out and about locally and I am invariably too paralyzed to say hello to the woman. 
          And then there is her considerable contribution to home cooking.  She is of the  devotees of “Cook Your Way Through Julia Child’s “Mastering the Art of French Cooking” School of Culinary Education.   And it has certainly served her well.  Now the provenance of her recipes is sometimes questioned. Unlike Ina who is forthright about what she learned from whom, Martha never attributes a thing to anyone but Martha.  I feel compelled to attribute posts from Martha’s recipes not just this week but for two weeks running. 

Thursday, June 5, 2014

Cinnamon Rhubarb Muffins from Fine Cooking Magazine


        

Rhubarb season, like asparagus season, is eagerly awaited at our house.  Andrew cannot wait to get his hands on the slender red and green stalks and get into the kitchen to bake. The first rhubarb of the season is always preferable to what comes later:  The thicker the stalks, the tougher and stringier the rhubarb. This may account for the love it or hate it reputation rhubarb has.  Notoriously tart, its natural companion is sugar to compensate for the bite.  These muffins however are not overly sweet, the Sour cream added to the batter keeps them that way.  The cinnamon gives them an irresistible scent.
         Botanically rhubarb is a vegetable. But in 1947 a court in New York ruled, in a burst of judicial clarity, that since it was used as a fruit in the US, it should be counted as a fruit for “purposes of regulations and duties”.   Since tariffs were higher for vegetables than fruits, the net effect of this ruling was that rhubarb was cheaper to import.  Despite having been grown in China for at least 2700 years and being brought to Europe by Marco Polo, rhubarb has only been grown in this country since about 1820. It was brought to Maine and Massachusetts by European settlers and moved westward from there.   If you do grow your own rhubarb –which is relatively easy to do as it’s a hardy perennial--note that only the stalks are edible. The leaves in fact are poisonous. Here’s the recipe for this wonderful seasonal treat, best served warm which can easily be accomplished by re-heating them at 350 degrees for 3 to 4 minutes.

Thursday, August 15, 2013

Double Crunch Sour Cream Coffee Cake



         At one point or another, savory cooks have to conclude their cooking is far less complicated than the exact science baking requires.  A savory cook can pretty much play it by ear, adding or subtracting ingredients, substituting one thing for another and still end up with a winning dish.  But leave out an ingredient in a cake or confuse baking soda with baking powder and a baker’s end result is often doomed.   That’s what impressed me with Andrew’s latest version of Coffee Cake.  Anyone whose been lucky enough to sample his baked goods knows this is a guy who knows his way around a Kitchen-Aid. But this latest creation was so over-the-top delicious, so perfectly baked, I’d like him to take a deep bow.

Wednesday, July 31, 2013

Blueberry Crumb Cake from John Barricelli's "The Seasonal Baker"

       
John Barricelli, Chef and
author of "The Seasonal Baker"
It’s blueberry season but I’ll take any excuse for making this combination of a vanilla cake with fresh blueberries and a chunky brown sugar crumb topping.  And since it can be eaten straight from the oven as a breakfast pastry or saved for an afternoon snack or a dessert with dinner, it’s ideal to have on hand over a weekend.  It’s another one of Baker John Barricelli’s triumphs from his South Norwalk CT SoNo Bakery.  You’ll find it in his latest book “The Seasonal Baker” 
(Clarkson Potter 2012) which we’ve raved about most recently for its French Lemon Tart.   What we loved about the tart—the concentrated lemon curd flavor of the filling—is mirrored in the intense blueberry flavor in this cake.  There’s even a juicy quality to the blueberries hidden under the topping.

Thursday, February 28, 2013

Joanne Chang's Sugar and Spice Brioche Buns, Cousin of one of our most popular posts ever--the Doughnut Muffin



The incomparable
Joanne Chang
         When we published Joanne Chang’s Sticky Bun recipe, winner of “Throwndown” with Bobby Flay, we heard from no less than Bobby himself.  “Joanne Chang's sticky buns are by far the best sticky buns I have ever eaten..hands down! If you are ever in Boston, stop in at Flour or try her recipe online on Foodnetwork.com or buy her great cookbook Flour...the recipe is there too...Yum”  Now if you haven’t already made these sticky buns, what are you waiting for? But if you have made them, then you may remember that the recipe for the dough was a double recipe.   Now of course, if you’ve gotten over your sugar shock from the sticky buns, you can make another batch.  But if you want to try something equally delicious, this is for you.

Thursday, January 10, 2013

Joanne Chang's Incomparable Sticky Buns from "Flour"



The book "Throwdown"
has over 100 recipes--
but only 33 of them are Bobby's 
Bobby Flay’s “Throwdown” has been around for 9 seasons on Food Network TV.  In case you missed any of the over 100 episodes, they’re rerun on the Cooking Channel often enough to clog your DVR. The popularity of the show has as much to do with its affable host, as it has to do with his subject matter. Chef Flay goes head to head with Chefs who are never quite as famous as he is.  Nonetheless, they have captured the hearts of their customers with dishes that are slightly more exalted than run-of-the-mill house specialties.   Bobby doesn’t cook the Chef’s recipe.  He and his two able assistants invent their own version of the signature dish that’s being featured.  One week, he takes on a barbecued ribs expert, the next an authority on chowder.  The local chef always appears gob smacked by Bobby’s sudden appearance on the scene.  But they recover fast and the contest is on, to be judged by local food authorities.  For the record, Bobby does not consistently win.  At the moment, he has had 32 wins, 1 tie and 68 losses.  I am slightly suspect that the local judges surely know which dish is Bobby’s and which is his challenger’s.  I mean they do live in these towns and they are supposed to know all about local food.  If they’re not bent on being run out of town, they may cheat to the hometown side’s advantage.  But that hardly takes away from the fun.

Thursday, July 21, 2011

New York-Style Crumb Cake from Baked Explorations

Crumb Topping Actual Size 

  Those boys from Brooklyn, Renato Poliafito and Matt Lewis, are no strangers on Chewing the Fat.  We just can’t get enough of their spectacular baking recipes from not one, but two great cookbooks: “Baked” (Stewart, Tabori and Chang 2008) and “Baked Explorations” (Stewart, Tabori and Chang 2010).  Today, we’d like to share a perfect way to start a weekend morning:   A crumb cake that’s more crumb than cake: The topping on this one is over the top. And for Andrew, it's a trip right back to his childhood.