HELPING FAMILY FARMS FLOURISH. HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY.
Showing posts with label Brunch Dishes. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Brunch Dishes. Show all posts

Monday, October 14, 2013

By Special Request: Monte’s Ham and Cheese Strata


  
        Recently, I was in charge of a Church breakfast.  I chose to make this wonderful dish: a gloriously cheese-topped casserole with crisp oversized croutons over a creamy egg and tender ham filling. Well the result was spectacular and the requests for the recipe were many.  I know why.  It's always a great time to make this dish. First of all, it can be expanded to feed any number of people.  You simply double or triple the portions and then haul out your Pyrex 9 x 13 instead of the souffle dish pictured here.  The other great advantage is that you make this up the day before.  So off I went to the Church kitchen late Saturday afternoon and put the whole thing together.  The next morning, all that was required was to pop it in the oven and in a little over an hour you have something very special for your breakfast or brunch table.  It’s very easy to put together. By the way, its' also a very good time to start to think of all the ways you can use Monte's Ham this season: We've got hams in stock and I'd love to put your name on one of them.  Just click the link about this post and order one today.  I like to serve this with a simply dressed green salad.  Here is the recipe:

Monday, September 16, 2013

Wild Mushroom and Sausage Hash with Poached Eggs

         
The 3 lb Gourmet Collection
is irresistible to Mushroom Lovers
All summer long, I’ve been working with Jane Maguire and John Quigley on their burgeoning Long Island Mushroom Inc. business.  The two have supplied restaurants that are at the very top of the Hamptons food chain.  And they’ve been at local farmers’ markets in Greenport and Shelter Island.  They’d be in more of these were it not for some of the restrictive policies that make farmers’ markets not nearly as competitive as they should be.  But never mind.  With products like their 3 lb. Gourmet Basket showcasing three varieties—Maitakes, Blue Oysters and Shiitakes—they’re going places.  If you’re a restauranteur, you’re in luck.  Given 24 hours notice, Long Island Mushroom Inc. promises delivery to any locale on the East End.  Just call 631 876 5401.  If you’re a consumer, they’ll be at the Farmers’ Market in Greenport and you can also find their offerings at Sang Lee Farm in Cutchogue, Garden of Eve in Riverhead, Country View Farm in Southold, and Schmitts Farm in Laurel.   I love their mushrooms and am constantly on the outlook for ways to serve them.  Today, I am going to share with you an ideal mushroom dish for Fall.   It’s a personal sacrifice too. Because once a recipe gets published here, that’s usually it for our house.  But in this case, I can’t imagine not making this again and again.

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Savory Roasted Tomato Tarte Tatin


         I recently came across a very detailed recipe for a tomato Tarte Tatin in August’s Bon Appetit.  Now I used to make Tarte Tatins at every opportunity.  They were hard to beat: You put butter and sugar into a cast iron pan and it magically turned into caramel.  You added pears or apples skin side down, covered the thing with pastry and into the oven it went.  Once done, you cautiously fiipped the tart over and voila!  Your pretty pears or apples glistened on a bed of pastry.  Add a scoop of ice cream and you had a dessert that even I could make.  This was of course before Andrew took up baking. Now, if I made dessert, people would be convinced that I’d lost my mind.  But I couldn’t get the Tomato Tarte Tatin out of my mind. 

Sunday, July 21, 2013

Mushroom and Pepper Jack Tart with Long Island Mushrooms

         
Long Island Mushroom company is the brainchild of two Rhode Island natives who grew up in the same town, became High School Sweethearts, parted ways and re-kindled their romance thirty-two years later.  Jane Maguire and John Quigley are their names and Long Island Mushroom is their second act-–both personally and professionally.  The couple have taken to mushroom farming in a big way.  Their 6500 square foot growing space on the North Fork is packed with glorious
Left to Right: Shiitakes, Blue Oyster and
Miitake Mushrooms from
Long Island Mushroom
Shiitakes, Miitakes and Blue Oyster mushrooms, the perfect combination for creating “wild” mushroom dishes without foraging for them on your own.  You don’t even have to clean them.  That’s because they are grown without soil on pressed paper and sawdust logs that they couple brings in from ‘the mushroom capital of the US’, Kennett Square Pennsylvania.  They’re grown under strict temperature controls and in very high humidity.  Each log produces ‘blooms’ of mushrooms that are harvested simply by being snapped off.  Each log produces 3 crops of mushrooms in a 48 day period before being replaced.  With Jane manning sales and John keeping the farm growing, Long Island Mushroom has found its way into the top restaurant kitchens on the East End, including “The Topping Rose House” in Bridgehampton, Tom Collichio’s wildly successful foray into the Hamptons. 

Friday, June 28, 2013

Asparagus with Lardons, a Fried Egg and Zen-sational Seasoning


         A few weeks ago, I told you about Pollen Ranch Spices (http://www.pollenranch.com), a remarkable company in the picturesquely named town of Lemon Cove, California.   My initial introduction to the company was their Fennel Pollen, a key ingredient in a recipe for Porchetta that I posted on Chewing the Fat.  Here’s the link: http://www.chewingthefat.us.com/2010/07/porchetta-slow-roasted-pork-shoulder.html.  Along with the hand collected organic fennel pollen, came a second tin of something called “Zen-sational”.  Pollen Ranch calls it ‘your secret ingredient'.  It’s a secret I’d latch on to if I were you.  It gave this simple Asparagus dish a great new taste. And exactly what is “Zen-sational”? 

Monday, February 11, 2013

Cajun Spiced Shrimp over Cheese Grits and Bacon


  
         Grits are about as southern as my Aunt Charlotte. She hailed from Huntsville, Alabama and yet never lost a syllable of her Southern accent despite living in Canada for decades.  But for all her southernism, Aunt Charlotte never introduced us to grits. That happy event took place in the Hamptons and only quite recently. I am tempted to say grits were the glue of a New Year’s Day Brunch our friend David gives every year.  But using glue and grits in the same sentence just reinforces an old stereotype: that grits are more akin to wallpaper paste than to anything good to eat.  That is simply not true.  Good grits are smooth and creamy.  Grits are high in iron, extremely low in fat and have no cholesterol at all.  That can’t be said of what grits are flavored with.  Everything from butter to cheese, from bacon to gravy and country ham have found their way into warm bowls of grits.   They not only raise the fat count, these additions do terrific things for the flavor.  Unfortunately, I found this out the hard way:  My first bowl of grits was about as tasty as, well, wallpaper paste.  They were nothing like David’s.  So I set out to see if I could break the taste barrier with my next foray into grits.  And I am pleased to say, today’s recipe broke the bank. Creamy, cheddar-y grits, flecked with bits of crisp bacon were topped with Cajun-spiced Shrimp, shallots and parsley.  As my friend Judith would say they’re like ‘wrapping your mouth around a bite of the south.’

Wednesday, October 26, 2011

Next stop in Montreal, an homage to Joe Beef, their recipe for a Foie Gras “Double Down” and a Mushroom Ragu with Burrata Cheese recipe created in Frederic Morin’s honor.



Joe Beef's notorious Double Down
Our Homage to the Chef, Frederic Morin
We realized there was no way we were going to pin a “Best Restaurant in Montreal” title on any one of the sensational places we ate.  They were uniformly great.  They all shared one quality that was really important to us. They were truly Quebecois, taking full advantage of what was locally grown. Their recipes were rooted in the cooking that’s made Quebec a foodie destination for far longer than I’ve been alive. And they’re all building on the past to make meals that feel so right today.  Take, for example, Joe Beef. 

Monday, June 20, 2011

Roasted Asparagus with Lardons and Fried Egg Adapted from Almond Restaurant in Bridgehampton NY



        It was hard to imagine the depths of despair that a lot of people felt when, in the middle of last winter, one of our favorite restaurants abruptly closed their doors.  Not only that, but they auctioned off the contents of the place, leaving us all wondering if Almond was gone forever.

Thursday, October 14, 2010

Wild Mushroom and Leek Tart



David Falkowski's  Oyster Mushrooms are beyond compare
Leeks from the Foster Family Farm
        One of the joys of being part of the Farmer’s Markets this fall has been getting first dibs on some incredible produce.  The market opens at 9 but everyone is generally in place before that.  I feel like an early bird at a Yard Sale because before we welcome our paying customers, I do a little shopping.  The bread from Blue Duck Bakery is superb.  You’ve read how good David Falkowski’s mushrooms are.  And right next to where I am, from the Foster Family farm in Sagaponack, there’s a beautiful array of vegetables every week.  That the farm still operates is a bit of a miracle:  The land is so valuable that mostly what has sprouted up in the neighboring fields are multi-million dollar houses.  At one point, Sagaponack was listed as the most expensive Zip code in the country.  But the Fosters carry on.  The soil in Sagaponack is said to be about the best on the East Coast.  Left behind millennia ago when the glaciers retreated, it’s six feet of loam in places!  So you can imagine how beautiful everything that’s grown there is.  Last week, I could not resist the leeks.  Putting them together with two of David’s mushroom varieties—dried porcinis and fresh Oyster Mushrooms— seemed the perfect thing to do.