HELPING FAMILY FARMS FLOURISH. HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY.
Showing posts with label Burgers. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Burgers. Show all posts

Monday, June 17, 2013

Pork and Portobello Burgers from Mark Bittman in the New York Times



         
         
Mark Bittman
Flexitarian
Mark Bittman is one of the most thoughtful of food writers.  He calls himself a Flexitarian, which he defines as a “moderate, conscious eater” whose goals are “a diet that is higher in plants and lower in both animal products and hyper processed foods, the stuff that makes up something like three-quarters of what’s sold in supermarkets.”  The term “Flexitarian” goes back to 2004 when it referred to vegetarians who, while eating mostly vegetables, began incorporating meat or fish.  And it also included people who were moving in the other direction, away from meat-heavy diets into a more vegetarian focused one. Bittman expands that to included whole grains and grains.  I think “Flexitarian” describes exactly what I try to do in our home kitchen. And I think it incorporates ideals that most of our readers try to achieve.  I’ve already taken some further steps in this direction.  I haven’t cut pasta out of our diet but I have changed the amount of it I cook in a single meal.  We are down to the equivalent of ¾ cup of dried pasta per serving.  Do we miss it?  Not for a minute. You get more sauce this way.   We also eat meatless meals with some frequency.  Now Bittman makes the point that when you do eat meat, you owe it to yourself, and your conscience to find meat that represents the best of the best in every way: From the way the animals are raised, to what they are fed and how they are brought to market. It's vital to know where your food comes from.  In this case, national brands like Neiman Ranch may be twice as expensive as supermarket pork, but by cutting back portion size, you may find them equal in cost and un-equalled in value.  So today’s post, while hardly meatless, cuts way down on the amount of meat per serving.  And what takes its place?

Monday, August 13, 2012

Portobello Mushroom Burgers with Pesto, Mozzarella and Red Peppers and a great recipe for Walnut Spinach Pesto from Daniel Holzman





         Our friend Stephen, the vegetarian, came to stay for a couple of days recently.  I always use Stephen’s visits as a chance to work on vegetarian recipes.  This particular stay, I had one triumph and one miserable fail.  I won’t go into the fail because it did produce a pesto that’s a great addition to any collection of recipes for that summer favorite.   And the triumph?  A Portobello Burger that even the most carnivorous among us can call his own.

Monday, August 6, 2012

The Perfect Turkey Burger with a little help from Cook’s Illustrated



         I am sure you’re aware of “Cook’s Illustrated” that quirky and incomparable publication presided over by a man named Christopher Kimball.  Mr. Kimball is the quintessential Vermonter and his practicality is evident on every page of his strictly-no-advertising-that’s-why-it-costs-$30-a year magazine.  Personally, its attention to detail and minutiae is fascinating although I could live without some of the “Quick Tips” which readers send in. In the most recent issue these include suggestions like using coffee filters to oil a grill grate and shoe organizers to store spices. On the other hand, the product reviews for everything from non-stick cookware to hot sauce are invaluable.  And then, of course, there is the length the Cook’s Illustrated Test Kitchen goes to perfecting recipes for everything from crab cakes to apple pan dowdy.  Take, for instance, their recent examination of the Turkey Burger.

Monday, April 11, 2011

Bobby Flay’s Salmon Burgers with Hoisin Barbecue Sauce



       I like Bobby Flay.  For quite a few years, I worked above his ‘store’. That would be his highly successful Mesa Grill (102 Fifth Avenue (15-16th St), NYC  Tel: 212-807-7400). At Mesa, his take on Southwestern cuisine virtually introduced New York to the flavors of that part of the country.  Of course, along the way, he reinvented dishes left, right and center.  There were his scrumptious Blue Corn Pancakes with Barbequed Duck.   And then there was the spicy heat and sweetness of his Ancho Chile Honey Glazed Salmon.  So when I ran across Bobby’s recipe for Salmon Burgers in “The Best of the Best Cookbook Recipes” Volume 13 (Food and Wine Books, American Express Publishing Corporation 2010), I couldn’t wait to try them.

Bobby, Hands-On at one of the Palaces

        Lately, Bobby has started to build his own Burger Empire.  He has 5 Bobby’s Burger Palaces scattered around New York, New Jersey and Philadelphia.  Since they are nowhere near where I am, I cannot vouch for any of them but I do know that one my favorite burger chefs tells me Bobby’s Burgers are the real deal.  And Bobby knows enough about burgers to have written the cookbook that got him into Food and Wine’s “Best of the Best”.  It’s called   “Bobby Flay’s Burgers, Fries and Shakes” (Random House 2009) and you can buy it right here.  Oddly, however, while the book serves up the Salmon Burger recipe, Bobby’s Burger Palaces do not.  The burgers there are all Beef, Chicken and Turkey.  There’s not one seafood item on the menu. My guess is if enough people try this recipe, they’ll start asking for it next time they hit the Burger Palace. 
 
        To appreciate this dish, you really should go the whole nine yards. And please, this is a really simple recipe.  It just has a lot of ingredients.  The meaty salmon pairs beautifully with the sweetness of the hoisin sauce. And don’t leave off the spicy Asian influenced slaw.   The pickled ginger that tops it really sets it apart from ordinary cole slaw.  There’s nothing here that you can’t readily find in the Asian aisle in most supermarkets.  Hoisin itself is sometimes referred to as the ketchup of Asia.  It’s truly ubiquitous. And with the popularity of Sushi at an all time high, pickled ginger isn’t all that hard to find either.   Use your food processor to chop the fish. It makes life much simpler. Here’s the recipe: 

Recipe for Bobby Flay’s Salmon Burgers with Hoisin Sauce and Asian Slaw

For the Hoisin Barbecue Sauce:

Hoisin Barbecue Sauce Ingredients
2 tablespoons canola oil
2 large shallots, coarsely chopped
2 cloves garlic, coarsely chopped
½ cup hoisin sauce
2 tablespoons ketchup
2 tablespoons honey
2 teaspoons soy sauce
2 teaspoons fish sauce
1 tablespoon rice wine vinegar

For the Salmon Burgers
:

1 ½ pounds fresh salmon
2 tablespoons canola oil
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
4 hamburger buns, split; toasted if desired. ( I used 7 Grain buns but any hamburger bun can be pressed into service)




For the Slaw:

2 tablespoons canola oil
¼ cup thinly sliced pickled ginger, plus more for garnish (optional)
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
¼ small head of red cabbage, finely shredded
½ medium head of napa cabbage, finely shredded
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
¼ cup rice wine vinegar
2 teaspoons toasted sesame oil
3 tablespoons finely chopped fresh cilantro leaves
First, make the Hoisin Barbecue Sauce

Heat the oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat.
Add the shallots and garlic and cook until soft, about 2 minutes.
Add the hoisin, ketchup, honey, soy sauce, fish sauce, and vinegar and cook until heated through and slightly thickened, about 10 minutes.
Set aside to cool.
(The sauce can be made 1 day in advance, covered, ad refrigerated. Bring to room temperature before using.)
To make the Salmon Burgers

To form the burgers, cut the salmon into large pieces and then coarsely chop in a food processor. Do not overprocess. (Alternatively you can chop it by hand with a sharp knife.)
Divide the salmon into 4 equal portions (about 6 ounces each). Form each potion loosely into a ¾-inch-think burger and make a deep depression in the center with your thumb.
Place on a plate, cover with plastic wrap, and let chill in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes before cooking.
Meanwhile, make the slaw.
Heat the oil in a large sauté pan over high heat.
Add the ginger and garlic and cook, stirring once, until soft, about 1 minute.
Stir in the cabbage, season, with salt and pepper, and cook, stirring once, until slightly wilted, 3 to 4 minutes.
Remove from the heat and stir in the vinegar, sesame oil, and cilantro. Let sit at room temperature.
To cook the burgers, heat the oil in a sauté pan or griddle (nonstick or cast iron) until it begins to shimmer.
Season both sides of each burger with salt and pepper. Cook the burgers until golden brown on the bottom sides, about 3 minutes.
Turn over, brush with some of the hoisin barbecue sauce, and continue cooking until medium-well, about 3 minutes longer.
Place the burgers on the bun bottoms, drizzle some hoisin barbecue sauce over them, and top with the slaw.
Garnish with pickled ginger. Cover with the burger tops and serve immediately.

Serves 4

    

Wednesday, April 28, 2010

A visit to April Bloomfield’s “The Breslin” and a recipe for Lamb Burgers with Yogurt Sauce and Tomatoes




        At The Breslin, April Bloomfield’s much-written-about “British Gastropub” at 16 West 29th Street,(TEL: (212) 679-1939), I  became totally enamored of the Lamb Burger.  It’s almost as outrageously tasty as the “Thrice Cooked Chips” that are as good, if not better, than any French fry I have ever tasted outside of France.  Together, these two items make the long wait for a table a reasonable proposition.  And that’s saying something because the place takes no reservations and even at lunch it’s jammed long before noon.

Wednesday, March 31, 2010

Joe and Liza’s Fish Sandwich from Bay Burger, Sag Harbor NY.



Three years ago in May, Joe and Liza Tremblay and took over a roadside place in Sag Harbor, NY, that was called “Linda’s Famous Cheesecake”.  I had one friend who swore by Linda’s cheesecake but to be honest, I could never figure out when the place was open.  It was desolate most of the time.  Then Joe and Liza came along and opened “Bay Burger” at 1742 Bridgehampton-Sag Harbor Turnpike, (631-899-3915).  Joe is a former grillman at the Burger Joint at Le Parker Meridien in Manhattan, generally acknowledged to have one of the best burgers in the city.  Liza is a Culinary Institute of America graduate who makes the couple’s eponymous ice cream.  The slogan for the ice cream is “It’s from the Hamptons so you know it’s rich”. 


Monday, March 8, 2010

Review of Bill’s Bar and Burger and a recipe for Chicken Parmigiano Burgers

  

 This weekend for the first time in what seems like months, we were finally able to walk anywhere without feeling that we were in a race against the cold.   So we jumped on the opportunity to visit the High Line. This is an only-in-New York invention: A ‘park’ on an abandoned elevated railroad spur on the far west side of Manhattan.  It’s currently runs from 20th St to just below 14th St and it packs people in as it wanders through the new Art Gallery district and through the modernist Architecture that’s building up around it.  A nice walk it was and by the time we got to the end of it, we were hungry.
Fortunately, Bill’s Bar and Burger is right there at 22 Ninth Avenue.  It opened in October and it’s been the toast of this burger-loving town ever since.  It’s been thoroughly covered by everyone who covers food in New York .  My favorite quote on the hand-out postcard at the bar:  “It was magnificent.  It restored my faith in hamburgers and the country that produced them.”- Vanity Fair (!) Wow.