HELPING FAMILY FARMS FLOURISH. HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY.
Showing posts with label Chicken Dishes. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Chicken Dishes. Show all posts

Monday, July 14, 2014

Moroccan Flavored Tagine of Chicken with special thanks to Mrs. Eileen Gaden

     

         I’ve wanted to cook in a tagine for ages and I mentioned this my friends Bill and Peter.  Now they are both the soul of generosity and recently when we were at their house for dinner, Bill presented me with 3 Tagines that had belonged to his grandmother.  Bill’s was no ordinary Grandmother.  She was Eileen Gaden of Gourmet Magazine, who, with a writing partner named Ann Seranne, was the author and photographer of countless cookbooks starting in 1946 with “The Modern Sandwich, The Art of Sandwich Making for All Occasions” and continuing for the next 50 years to produce cookbooks on anything and everything. They even wrote for Proctor and Gamble: In 1956 they published "Creative Cooking Made Easy: The Golden Fluffo Cookbook".  Then came “The Blender Cookbook”(1961) (which they later updated and called “The Food Processor Blender Cookbook” in 1981). In the intervening years they produced, “The Church and Club Woman’s Companion”(1964), “The Complete Book of Desserts” (1969) and high on my wish list: “1001 Ideas for Parties, Fairs and Suppers (1964). I keep hoping Bill has a mint copy of that one because Amazon lists its price new as $2432.64. 

Monday, February 18, 2013

Chicken and Mushroom Hash with Poached Eggs



         Judging from the popularity of James Beard’s recipe for Roast Beef Hash, which has had 3801 pageviews, and that of Ina Garten’s Chicken Hash at 682, Hash has a special place on the tables of our readers.   It certainly is at our house.  Unfortunately, one of the downsides of writing a blog like this is that I virtually never make the same dish twice. This doesn’t really present a problem as the world is full of wonderful things to cook and wonderful ways to cook them.  But it does mean that old favorites like the two hashes, once they are ready for their appearance on Chewing the Fat, seldom, if ever, appear on our table again.  So when I came across Saveur magazine’s new take recipe on the dish, I was delighted.

Thursday, June 7, 2012

Moo Goo Gai Pan


         The other day, when I opened a post from Bee at www.rasamalaysia.com, along with Bee's recipe for Moo Goo Gai Pan came a flood of memories.  It instantly took me back to my childhood in Montreal.  Not that I ever ate Moo Goo Gai Pan. I don’t think Chinese food in any form ever crossed the Mathews’ family doorstep.  However, my parents had one friend in particular whose entire diet seemed to consist of Chinese take-out.  At least that’s the way it looked to me at aged 10. 

Monday, May 21, 2012

Thomas Keller’s Chicken Schnitzel


Chef Thomas Keller
           I was somewhat surprised to come across this recipe in Food and Wine magazine. It comes from the renowned Chef Thomas Keller of Bouchon Bakery, Per Se, Ad Hoc and The French Laundry fame.  He of the $375.00 tasting menu seems to have turned his attention to some $2.99 lb. boneless chicken breasts.  That said, what a wonderful dish this is!  It is crispy, crunchy chicken at its best.  The sauce is a perfect counterbalance with its lemon-y capers in butter drizzled over the top.  This takes all of 15 minutes from start to finish.  And let’s face it, it’s basically fried chicken – no matter what Chef Keller calls it -- and who doesn’t love Fried Chicken ?

Monday, March 26, 2012

Jonathan Waxman’s Roasted Chicken with Salsa Verde



         When you can vividly remember a lunch you had ten years ago, I would have to say that’s the power of great cooking.  I distinctly remember a visit to Washington Park on lower Fifth Avenue.  The restaurant marked the triumphant return to New York of Chef Jonathan Waxman.  Chef Waxman was a California cuisine pioneer. Name a famed West Coast restaurant and Waxman may very well have worked there.  For starters, add Michael’s in Santa Monica to a list that included a stint at Alice Waters’ Chez Panisse.  In the mid 80s, he took Manhattan by storm after opening an Upper East Side place called, appropriately, Jam’s, which was pretty much how you felt jammed into the bar waiting for your table.  Such was the incredible popularity of the  place.  And what was it that I remember from that lunch in 2002?  Why Chef Waxman’s chicken, of course.

Thursday, January 12, 2012

Chicken with Prosciutto, Chard and Pine Nuts


It's easy to see why it is called
Rainbow Chard
         I have significant lapses in my culinary adventures.  Before I made this perfect weeknight dinner with its amazing range of delicious tastes and textures, I had never cooked Chard.  I will not go so far as to say I had never eaten  Chard but it certainly has never been something I actively sought out of any menu I can remember. I imagined a bitter taste, something akin to some truly unpleasant experiences I have had with collard greens.  But in the spirit of locovore eating, nothing makes more sense in January than eating this very hardy vegetable. You can find freshly cut at Winter Farmer’s Markets. Mine, I confess, came straight from California via Fairway Market.  Hardly local but certified organic.

Tuesday, January 3, 2012

Aromatic Braised Chicken with Fried Onions



Kerala, Land of Coconuts
         Talk about a recipe that lives it to its name!  This glorious chicken dish perfumes the house with a wonderful aroma of spices—ginger, curry, cloves and cinnamon.  And then, when you bring it to the table and serve it over some cardamom-scented Basmati rice, it proves to be as delicious a taste as it is an aroma.  Its Indian pedigree is fascinating. It comes from Kerala, the state that’s almost at the tip of the Indian sub-continent.  From the look of it, Kerala lives up to its name, which means “Land of Coconuts”.  Kochi, formerly known as Cochin, is its capital and there you’ll find this dish’s creator and her eponymous cooking school.  Nimmy Paul is her name and her background is as complex as India itself.

Monday, November 28, 2011

Celebrating the 45th Anniversary of Truman Capote’s Black and White Ball With Ina Garten’s Chicken Hash


Truman Capote and his 'date' Katherine Graham

An entire book was written about
       Truman's Black and White Ball
 In 1966, Truman Capote was flush with success.  His ‘non-fiction novel’, the term he used to describe “In Cold Blood”, was a hit.  He decided to throw himself a party.    On the night of November 28th, exactly 45 years ago, Truman had invited 540 of the most glittering people in the world to his masked “Black and White Ball” at New York’s Plaza Hotel. He billed it as a kind of “Coming Out Party” for Katherine Graham who had taken over as President of the Washington Post Company following the suicide of her husband Phillip some three years earlier.  In point of fact, it was more likely a “Coming Out Party” for Truman himself.  It was hugely publicized before it took place so that when it did, the Plaza was mobbed with Papparazzi and just plain folks. They all turned out the see the rich and famous in their spectacular Black and White costumes and masks.   At midnight, supper was served.  The menu had only one main course.  Chicken Hash.

Monday, September 26, 2011

Tomato, Garlic and Mozzarella Stuffed Chicken Breasts



After I made these golden-seared chicken breasts with their moist center of plump ripe tomatoes, melted cheese and pungent garlic sauce, I wondered if I could call this an original recipe.  But when, exactly, is a recipe an original?  This is a hard question to answer because there don’t seem to be any hard and fast rules. Interestingly, copyright laws don’t give a lot of help here. From what I have read, while most cookbooks are themselves copyrighted, the individual recipes can’t be. The theory is that recipes are in the “public domain”.  This relies on the idea that several people can, at any time, come up with the same thing—ingredients and cooking techniques being pretty well universal. What copywriting a cookbook does is to bar copying every recipe out of that cookbook, in the same order, and then trying to make money out of your purloined manuscript.  But how then do people win Recipe contests?  Aren’t they all variations on something else someone else has done?  That’s factually correct. People who win things like the Pillsbury Bake-Off generally do so by adapting a recipe, changing up its key flavors but keeping the cooking method pretty much one that’s tried and true.

Monday, April 18, 2011

Filipino Fried Noodles with Chicken and Vegetables courtesy of “The Asian Grandmother’s Cookbook” by Patricia Tanumihardja



        I have some good friends whose families are Filipino. And although for some time, my friend Ethel has threatened to kidnap me and take me to Queens for some Filipino restaurant food, we haven’t made it yet.   Come to think of it, there are far more Korean and Thai and Vietnamese restaurants all over the place than there are Filipino. And until this dish came along, I’d never cooked anything from there.  But this stir fry is well worth making for its subtle fresh flavors.  It’s absolutely not hard to make at all. There’s just some dicing and chopping and you’re good to go.  And you certainly don’t need a wok; You can easily use a big non-stick frying pan like I did.   For those of you averse to heat or feeding young children, this is a really wonderfully mild dish that no one’s going to find too spicy.   
        Filipino cooking is all about combinations of sweet, sour and salty generally combining all three in one dish.  However, it is not heavily spiced. I even had to send the recipe to my friend Ethel to see whether there was any chance I'd left something out or that the recipe had been spiced down for the American palate.  No, she said.  It was very much on the lines of what her grandmother prepared on her last trip to the Philippines.  I found this quite amazing given that Hispanic, Chinese and other Asian cultures have all influenced Filipino food.  The earliest Filipinos came from Southern China and Taiwan.  Trading with other Asian countries led to a lot more blending of cuisines.  It was the Spanish who brought chili peppers and tomatoes into the Phillipines.   But even then, the peppers were frequently used just for their leaves and not for their punch. After the Spanish established themselves, there was an even greater influx of ethnic Chinese.  In fact, Chinese food became the staple of the panciterias or noodle shops that burst onto the scene in the 19th century.   The recipe I am sharing with you today could have come right from a panciteria. It even gets its Filipino name from there: Pancit.
        Pancit is probably one of the best known Filipino dishes. But Pancit has about as many recipes as there are Filipino cooks.  This one, from a marvelously instructive cookbook called  “The Asian Grandmother’s Cookbook” by PatriciaTanumihardja (Sasquatch Books, 2009) uses both Rice noodles and and Chinese wheat noodles. But if those aren’t readily available you can use flat egg noodles and cellophane noodles which are relatively easy to find if your supermarket has an Asian aisle. Here’s the recipe:


Recipe for Pancit, Filipino Fried Noodles
Rice Noodles
8 oz dried vermicelli (rice noodles) (1/2 package)









Chinese Wheat Noodles
8 oz pancit canton noodles (you can also use Chinese egg noodles)








2 tablespoons vegetable oil (I like canola)
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 small onion, chopped finely (about 1-1/2 cups)
1 pound chicken breast or thigh, cut into bite-sized pieces
1/4 cup toyomansi (if you don’t have toyomansi, use 1/2 cup soy sauce and squeeze in 1 to 2 tablespoons of lemon or lime juice to taste)
1/4 cup soy sauce

1/2 head small cabbage, shredded (about 4 cups)
2 large carrots, peeled and shredded (about 1-1/2-2 cups)
2 stalks celery, trimmed and chopped
2 stalks green onions, cut into ‘O’s (optional for garnish)
Soak rice noodles in warm water for 10-15 minutes until soft, then cut into 4-inch lengths. Place the egg noodles in a large heat-proof bowl. Pour boiling water to cover. Let stand 1 minute. Drain and set aside.
In a wok or large skillet, stir fry garlic and onions in oil until fragrant and onions are translucent, about 2 minutes, over medium-high heat. Add chicken and fry until no longer pink. Add toyomansi and soy sauce. Toss to coat chicken. Add vegetables and stir fry until cabbage wilts. 



Add noodles and keep stir frying until well coated and heated through. I know it looks very unprofessional but I recommend using the two-handed method to evenly toss the noodles like below.
Add water or stock a few tablespoons at a time if noodles are looking too dry. Test rice noodles for doneness. Scatter green onions for garnish and serve.