HELPING FAMILY FARMS FLOURISH. HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY.
Showing posts with label Christmas recipes. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Christmas recipes. Show all posts

Monday, December 22, 2014

Shrimp Scampi, an amazingly fast Italian American Classic and the story of the Feast of the 7 Fishes.


                                                       

Scampi

 I first wrote this post a year ago. But I thought I would repeat it again this year because it's a wonderful explanation of an Italian tradition that many Italian Americans will uphold again this Christmas Season. And the recipe follows my mantra for the season: Get 
something on the dinner table in no time and impress one all with a wonderful dish for all to savor. I had some 20-25 count Shrimp and started poking around for a recipe that had not appeared on Chewing the Fat.  Since there have been no less that 41 shrimp recipes published here, it amazed me to discover that the Italian American restaurant classic, Shrimp Scampi, had never made an appearance here.  How clearly I remember Scampi from my first forays into an Italian restaurant in Montreal.  The overtly garlic-y, buttery sauce was a sensation—especially if you teamed it up with crusty bread to soak up the sauce.  Later, when I went to school in Italy and learned the language, I was surprised to hear that ‘Shrimp Scampi’ is rather like calling something Chicken Poulet.  Scampi is the ingredient “langoustines” -- an Italian version of shrimp.  But this dish itself is pure Italian American cooking, plain and simple and incredibly easy to make.  I was astonished that the whole thing took under ten minutes to make. In fact, it’s so speedy, you feel like a one-armed paper hanger juggling the cooking of the shrimp, with the 3 minutes it takes the angel hair pasta to cook.  But this is a winner from start to finish and before the feasting begins tomorrow, it’s a perfect thing to serve the night before the night before Christmas.  Except, perhaps, if you’re Italian, because your Christmas Eve Feast will satisfy your hunger for seafood for quite a while.   I’ll take you through the Scampi recipe after introducing you to The Feast of the 7 Fishes.

Friday, November 21, 2014

Thanksgiving Way Out West: Cornbread and Sausage Dressing




        There are stuffing people and there are dressing people, but no Thanksgiving Dinner is complete without one of the two. Not even one in California. ( By the way, the only difference between stuffing and dressing is whether you put the stuff in the bird or cook it separately.)  And between turkey and stuffing or dressing there’s very little color difference which may be one reason green beans are so popularly served with a Turkey dinner. But a few years ago, I found a recipe for Cornbread Dressing that included copious amounts of parsley and celery and, then, triumphantly for those of us desperate for color, red pepper. 

Friday, December 6, 2013

B'Soffener Kapuziner, an Austrian Family favourite nut-based cake, liberally doused with Gluhwein from the Stracey Family Cookbook


         When I was growing up in Montreal, my family had an endless stream of visitors, most of whom had some connection to my parent’s time in Britain during the Second World War.  They were both volunteers—my father was a Major in the Canadian Army and my mother worked tirelessly at the American Red Cross in London.  One of our visitors was a young man, my godmother’s nephew, who arrived in Montreal to study Engineering at McGill.   He ended moving in with us and became very much a part of our family.  He stayed in Canada after graduation and married a lovely girl from Austria. They had two daughters, and among other things, opened a restaurant called "Le Carafon". After years in Montreal, Simon returned to England and assumed his hereditary title as the baronet Stracey;  He became Sir John and his wife Lady Martha, who is referred to as her ladyship in the following post.  You may remember Lady Martha from last year’s spectacularly successful post on Austrian Cookies.  It has been downloaded over 2000 times.  Here’s the link:  http://www.chewingthefat.us.com/2011/12/three-authentic-austrian-cookie-recipes.html.  This year, Simon promised me another authentic family recipe and he has made good on his offer. Here’s the story of B’Soffener Kapunziner and if it is as good as everything else her ladyship bakes, you should add it to your Christmas repertoire. By the way, you may not know it, but my family always called me Dick.  My first name is, after all, Richard.  “Chimo”, in case you wonder, is a greeting from the Inukitut language, spoken by the Inuits, as Canada's Eskimos are now called. 

Monday, December 28, 2009

Two hams gone wrong…and two recipes that could have saved them…Cuban Pernil and Pigeon Peas and RIce




Ingrid Hoffman's Recipe for Cuban Pernil uses a Fresh Ham as its start off point.

Much to my absolute horror, my dear friend, Ann Legette in Greensboro, NC, sent me the following email yesterday…
“Hello Darling,
It was so fun to have a funny story to share at Christmas lunch with the extended Legette family – about cooking my first ham, “Monte’s Ham.” I have a feeling all I will need to share with you is my dear friend and next door neighbor’s comment (who slipped in the kitchen door as I was carving the ham) and you will know exactly where I went wrong…
“Honey, that’s not a ham, that’s a turkey!”

Thursday, December 24, 2009

Cornbread and Sausage Dressing



Let’s face it: Turkey and Stuffing and/or Dressing is one of the brownest things you can make. By the way, the only difference between stuffing and dressing is whether you put the stuff in the bird or cook it separately. And between turkey and stuffing or dressing there’s very little color difference which may be one reason green beans are so popularly served with a Turkey dinner. But a few year’s ago, I found a recipe for Cornbread Dressing that included copious amounts of parsley and celery and, then, triumphantly for those of us desperate for color, red pepper.