HELPING FAMILY FARMS FLOURISH. HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY.
Showing posts with label Curries. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Curries. Show all posts

Monday, November 3, 2014

Dinner in Burma: Shrimp Curry and Smoky Napa Cabbage From Naomi Duguid's "Burma: Rivers of Flavor"

        
         I am insanely jealous of Naomi Duguid.  This writer, photographer, cook and traveller has made a career out seeing of the world and bringing it home in cookbooks.  What a dream job for a foodie with wanderlust!  Duguid has written six books about Asian cooking alone and this year came out with “Burma: Rivers of Flavor” (Artisan 2013).  The book won the International Association of Culinary Professionals (ICAP) 2013 award for Culinary Travel for Naomi and her co-author Jeff Alford.  Burma, or Myanmar, is a country steeped in mystery.  An ancient civilization, it became a British colony in the 1800s and only gained independence in 1948.  Unfortunately Independence heralded the arrival of one of the longest civil wars ever recorded.  In fact, it was untouched by the outside world for generations and really has only opened up in 2010. As a result, it is one of the least-developed countries in the entire world. 

Tuesday, February 16, 2010

Lamb and Tomato Curry and Indian Asparagus


Above: The ingredients of a great curry even look beautiful.   

 Indian curries are a favorite of mine.  While the Indians eat them to keep cool in their hot climate, I eat them to keep warm in ours—especially with this winter’s record-breaking low temperatures.  This particular curry was the brainchild of one of my favorite Indian cooks, Vij Vikram whose recipe for Short Ribs in Red wine and Cinnamon has already appeared here.  This time, Vij turns up the heat quite a bit but you can control it easily by reducing the cayenne pepper count if you must.  I find that Basmati rice goes a long way to putting out any fires. 
    I paired this with a recipe for Asparagus that was invented by an Indian vegetarian cook named Manjula Jain.  Manjula came to this country in the late 60s.  And like Vij, she has adapted a North American ingredient to an Indian palate.  Asparagus is not unknown in India but it is rare and usually confined to the south of India.  Manjula is from the north.  I admire both of these cooks so much for taking something locally grown and making it taste so exotic.  You can visit www.manjulaskitchen.com and see the extent of her vegetarian recipes.  I can’t vouch for them all, but the one for asparagus is a definite keeper.