HELPING FAMILY FARMS FLOURISH. HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY.
Showing posts with label Fine Cooking Magazine. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Fine Cooking Magazine. Show all posts

Saturday, November 17, 2012

Thanksgiving 101 - Brown Butter Pumpkin Layer Cake



The Comfort Family's Farm on Lumber Lane in Bridgehampton. A great place to get your pumpkin if you are lucky enough to live on the East End.  
           Beyond Roast Turkey and Stuffing, there's nothing that says Thanksgiving more than pumpkin.  But this year, instead of pumpkin pie, how about a phenomenally delicious Pumpkin cake?  This one, with it's brown butter frosting and pecan topping, really does take the cake.  
        For Thanksgiving, Andrew is always bitten by the pumpkin bug…well, not literally, but he goes into high pumpkin mode.  With help from Fine Cooking, the magazine we really think would make a terrific addition to your kitchen, he made this  remarkable cake:  

Friday, November 16, 2012

Thanksgiving 101: Gratin of Sweet Potatoes and Leeks



        My friend Betty once told me a riotous story of being invited to a Thanksgiving dinner and being asked to "bring something".  When she arrived on the big day, there were 12, count 'em, sweet potato casseroles.  Lesson learned: If you're going 'potluck' on Turkey Day, assign the side dishes.  And you couldn't do much better than this deliciously rich gratin. It's a true example of  over-the-top Thanksgiving cooking. Fair warning…this is one of the richest things (aka fatty) I’ve made in a very long time.  But it was so delicious and really satisfying in tiny portions that I’d make again in a heartbeat…assuming I still had a pulse after consuming the pancetta and cream involved in the dish.
The other great thing about this dish is that it benefits from being made ahead. You can put the whole thing together a couple of days in advance and take it right up to the baking stage on the big day.  It also is very forgiving and can be cooked longer than the time given which is always a huge help when you're putting together your Thanksgiving dinner.  Another advantage to it's timing is that it's a lot easier to serve in beautiful little squares if it rests before serving.
All in all, it's a winner in every way.

Wednesday, December 21, 2011

Doughnut Muffins, our most popular post ever!




As part of our 12 days of Christmas recipes, we really could not let the season pass without sending you this wonderful recipe.  It is by far the most viewed page out of all 250 recipes we've published.  Nothing we've shared with you comes close.  And with the most comments we've ever gotten on any post, this is clearly a winner.  It is off the charts in another way too.  These muffins are absolutely, insanely delicious.  They taste like the best doughnut you ever ate.  Rolled in butter and cinnamon and sugar, they are, my friend Luka (aged about 12), messy to make but oh what fun to eat.  I think they might be the perfect Christmas morning treat while sitting around the tree.  Here's the back story for you. 


Food Network has been running a series called “The Best Thing I Ever Ate”.  I was pretty sure they’d run out of “best things” fairly quickly—but the show divvies them up into categories.  So one is about the best thing with bacon, the best pizza, the best barbecue—you get the picture.  Well one night, while watching the horribly named “The Best Thing I ever ate—Snack attack”,  Candace Nelson, who owns 6 California bakeries called “Sprinkles”, waxed on and on about a “Doughnut Muffin” she’d discovered at Downtown Bakery and Creamery in Healdsberg, CA.        
        My personal Pastry Chef, Andrew Phillips, had taken a run at doughnuts in the not-too-distant past.  He was underwhelmed by the results.  When the Doughnut Muffin presented itself, he was intrigued.


Monday, November 22, 2010

Gratin of Sweet Potatoes and Leeks and other Thanksgiving delights



It's Thanksgiving and if ever there was a time to cook, this is it.  I love this holiday. Like many people who weren't born in this country, I see this day as a true celebration of America.  And in its inclusion of everyone-- regardless of what religion they do or do not practice --it is a celebration of us all.  And it doesn't hurt that the food we serve is some of the most delicious we make all year. And clearly the most bountiful. 

Today's post is truly an example of over-the-top Thanksgiving cooking.   Fair warning…this is one of the richest things (aka fatty) I’ve made in a very long time.  But it was so delicious and really satisfying in tiny portions that I’d make again in a heartbeat…assuming I still had a pulse after consuming the pancetta and cream involved in the dish.


Monday, October 25, 2010

Quick Chicken Parmigiano



        Who doesn’t need a weeknight supper they can get on the table in under 30 minutes?  This dish from Fine Cooking is a keeper.  It really was on the table in no time.  It’s got a lot of flavor and crunch.  It gives you the pleasure of fried food but it’s not.  It’s sautéed.  The secret here is Panko breadcrumbs.  These great Japanese imports are a terrific addition to any pantry.  They’re far superior to Italian breadcrumbs. You can even find them at Whole Foods in a whole wheat variety.  The other tip here is to use the recommended Muir Glen Fire Roasted tomatoes.  They really have a significantly better taste than ordinary diced tomatoes.  Of course, they’re organic but they’re only slightly more expensive than plain old diced tomatoes.  Then there’s the cheese.  Parmigiano is a staple at our house. I always have it on hand. 

Tuesday, July 27, 2010

Egg Foo Yung with Chicken and Shiitake Mushrooms


"Fine Cooking" is at it again.  In their current “Make it Tonight” section of ‘just 30 minutes to dinner, start to finish’ recipes, more than one of them caught my eye.  So it became a game of deciding which to make first.  And after I’d read the nutrition information on their take on Egg Foo Yung, I was hooked.  It comes in at 350 calories a serving with 22 grams of protein and, miraculously, just 8 grams of carbohydrates!  Now that's worth making.


Friday, May 14, 2010

Tunisian Short Ribs



       Fine Cooking ran an interesting article about short ribs in its February March 2010 issue.  It invited the reader to invent their own recipe for those wonderfully slow-cooked pieces of falling-off-the-bone meat.   It gave options for the aromatics you use, with a range of spices and herbs and flavor boosters you chose to make your version. You then selected the deglazing liquid and the braising liquid itself. And finally, once the finished dish was ready, it recommended ‘finishes’ and garnishes.  You can see for yourself in this clever interactive recipe builder at http://www.finecooking.com/articles/cyor/braised-short-ribs.aspx
        I know it’s almost time to put the Short Rib recipes away and get out the grill.  But we still tucked into these ribs this past weekend and they were a big hit.  I followed Fine Cooking’s inspirations and made a couple of additions and substitutions to create something “Tunisian”. I could have gone with a Red Wine Braise or made them Hunter Style or Tuscan, or Provencal or even South-Western but “Tunisian” sounded unlike anything I’d done before.

Friday, April 30, 2010

Olive Oil Poached Shrimp with Ginger-Tomato Sauce and Avocado and Carrot Salad



        I am always on the lookout not just for recipes but for cooking techniques to share.  I thought we had shrimp completely under control with Ina Garten’s Roasted Shrimp recipe.  The oven roasted results beat any boiled shrimp we’d ever tasted.  We’ll never make shrimp cocktail any other way. 

But here’s a recipe that uses Olive Oil as a poaching liquid and turns out the most tender, beautifully cooked creatures and, if you time them precisely, in 25 minutes you have absolutely exquisite shrimp.   And no, they are not the least bit ‘oily’.  That’s really the only downside to the recipe.  You need at least 17 ounces of the stuff or enough to fill a sauté pan with an inch of oil.  But after I finished, I strained what I’d used, put it back in its bottle and into the refrigerator for re-use.  And, like those ancient commercials for Crisco Oil, I was amazed at how little of the oil had been absorbed.  I had very close to the full bottle I started out with.  

Please don’t use your best Olive Oil for this dish.  You don’t really have to use Extra Virgin.  Just a good bottle of standard olive oil will do.  The sauce is wonderful too.  I served it with a simple Carrot and Avocado Salad.  With the pink shrimp, red ginger-tomato sauce, there was a lot of beautiful color on our dinner table. 

Monday, March 22, 2010

Pasta alla Puttanesca with (or without) Shrimp



I am making a concerted effort to put some great vegetarian recipes together for all kinds of reasons—health, being eco-friendly and just giving us all more options for terrific meals. Recently, a fellow member of my Food Writer’s Boot Camp went to a lot of trouble to send me a great vegetarian main dish which I am working on sharing with you soon.  But it the meantime, this recipe, which came out of the February/March “Fine Cooking”, is a fantastic discovery.  You can satisfy your vegetarian eaters and/or you can take it to another level by adding some shrimp in the last few minutes.  So one dish can be served two ways—at the same seating.  It’s perfect for families where increasingly there’s a vegetarian at the table. 

Monday, January 25, 2010

Sesame Chicken with Orange and Soy Glaze from a magazine that’s a new favorite



        Even with the demise of "Gourmet", our mailbox isn’t exactly empty of food magazines. I still subscribe to at least 6 of them.  And since I started a course called “Food Writer’s Boot Camp”, our house is practically a library for food magazines.  Even just sticking to the English language, we’ve now been introduced to “Delicious” and “Donna Hay” (Australia),"Clean Eating" (Canada) “Cuisine” (New Zealand), “Jamaican Eats” (terrible and strangely aligned to Canada), “Food and Travel”, “Jamie” “Waitrose Food Illustrated”, “Good Food Italian” from the BBC of all places and, our favorite, “Olive”, all from the U.K. 
Not to ignore the American entries that were completely new to us, we’ve discovered "VegNews" and "Vegetarian Times" “Gastronomica”, "Food" “Tastes of Italia”, something called “Southern Lady” which featured upfront an ad for a “Faith building weekend with ‘Southern Lady’ and Christian women from across the nation”.  Well, “Chacun a son gout” as the French say.  But far and away the best discovery among the American magazines was one I’d seen but never picked up before: “Fine Cooking”.