HELPING FAMILY FARMS FLOURISH. HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY.
Showing posts with label Fish. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Fish. Show all posts

Friday, February 7, 2014

Poached Salmon with Minted Yogurt Sauce


Cooking is often the most Zen activity of my day. Especially when I come across a recipe that is elegant in its simplicity, beautiful to look at as I am preparing it and finally, a wonderful experience when it is eaten.  This recipe, which came from Food and Wine, falls right into that category.  It’s so soothing looking that I made its cooking the main illustration above.  With its parsley and dill branches looking like reeds in a stream, it’s a treat just to look at.  But the surprise came when we tasted our first bites.

Monday, January 13, 2014

Herb-Crusted Cod with Lemon-Dill Beurre Blanc Sauce

       
What’s wonderful about this dish is that its name alone sounds as if you’ve gone to an inordinate amount of trouble making it.  In reality, it’s one of the easiest things on earth to get on the table.  This recipe is as close as I could come to a dish that’s an all-time favorite at Sag Harbor’s “Dockside” restaurant.  Now “Dockside” at 26 Bay Street (Tel: 631-725-7100) is an anomaly. It’s situated in one half of the American Legion Hall. Dockside’s bar is decorated with the crests of the service branches the Legion represents.  Believe it or not, there’s a dearth of places in the Hamptons with water views.  While Dockside is not port side, it is right across the road from the yachts and sailboats moored and docked at the Sag Harbor Yacht Club.  It has an outdoor
terrace that’s a wonderful place for lunch on a sunny day. And for small town Americana, what could beat the Sag Harbor Community Band’s Tuesday night concerts?  These are held directly in front of the Legion every Tuesday in July and August. If you’ve lucky enough to snag a table at Dockside, which does not take reservations, you’ll be serenaded with rousing music in the style of John Phillip Sousa. “Dockside” is a second generation restaurant owned by Stacy Sheehan’s father before Stacy took over and transformed the place from a hamburger joint into a really great place to eat wonderful local food.  Among the offerings is a version of Herb-Crusted Cod with Lemon Beurre Blanc.  Now that Dockside has closed down for the season and won’t reopen until February 13 th, I couldn’t wait to make this at home.  But first, of course, I had to check on the cod.

Monday, October 7, 2013

Fish in Crazy Water and a tribute to the woman who introduced me to it and countless other Italian recipes, Marcella Hazan



Marcella and Victor Hazan, as loving and giving
a couple as one could ever hope to know.
If I’d never been introduced to Marcella Hazan, my cooking would have been so much poorer for it.  Marcella died last week at her home in Naples, Florida where she and her inspirational muse and husband of 58 years, Victor Hazan, had retired some years ago.  It was a loss that countless numbers of us felt deeply.  Her readers, her dear husband and her devoted son, Giuliano, were all stunned because up until the very last she was sharing her infinite wisdom with us via Facebook, of all places.  I know this only too well as I had not only ‘friended’ her but been the recipient of her advice on several occasions.  I’d written about the Italian disdain for cheese coming anywhere near seafood.  She shot right back that she’d changed her mind about that particular taboo.  She also wrote me when I had a question about a strawberry dessert.  She was endlessly generous with her time and I can’t tell you how the food writer in me was overwhelmed that I would hear from this extraordinary authority who surely had better things to do.

Thursday, August 8, 2013

Whole Roasted Striped Bass with Lemon and Mint Chimichurri. An Adventure in Fish Cookery!

 
        
Long Island is surrounded by water and the East End, where we live, is particularly blessed.  Not two miles from our house is Peconic Bay, which feeds into the Long Island Sound separating New York from Connecticut.  Four miles in the other direction brings you to the Atlantic Ocean.  In our town, this is pure beach front territory. But travel 30 miles East and you’ll come to Montauk.  Until very recently, this town was all about fish.  Some people earnestly wish it would return to its roots.  In the last couple of years, it’s become a party place for city hipsters.  There are any number of names for these new arrivals, most of them unpleasant as in “Citiots”.   But Montauk will always mean fish to those of us less recently arrived.  So when we were planning a recent dinner party, I couldn’t think of a better thing to serve than a fresh-caught Whole Striped Bass caught from a boat off Montauk in the morning, delivered to our fresh fish emporium within hours, gutted, de-gilled and handed over to us the same afternoon.  Talk about fresh! 

Thursday, June 20, 2013

Anna Pump's Grilled Fresh Tuna Steaks with Lemon Sauce


        The Hamptons are rich in culinary talent. And Anna Pump is at the top of that list.  Her influence on local cooking and eating reaches back to her arrival here in the late 1970s.  Born in the town of Tarp, Germany, Anna and her late husband, Detlef, came to the United States with their two children in the 1960s. The family first settled in New Jersey where Detlef had a brother.  Offered a house in Southampton for two weeks one summer, the two fell instantly in love with the area, which reminded them of Tarp.  Even the potato fields felt familiar.  Tucked up next to the Danish border, the town has the Baltic on one side, the North Sea on the other.  The couples’ two children, son Harm and daughter Sybille were off to college so their parents went home to New Jersey and came right back out looking for a house.  The one they found and lovingly saved from ruin is the same house Anna lives in to this day. 

Monday, June 10, 2013

Branzino with Arugula Sauce from Chef Sandro Romano of Armani Ristorante in New York



        
Armani Ristorante hasn’t exactly barged its way into the New York culinary scene.  Some wags have even suggested that Giorgio Armani opened the place solely to be able to enjoy pasta his way. He’d made no effort to conceal his displeasure with the heavily sauced pastas he’d been served in New York.  The restaurant, on the third floor of the flagship Armani store at 717 Fifth Ave. (Tel: 212 207 1902), has a lunch following that drops off the minute the store closes.  It’s then that you use the entrance right around the corner on 56th  Street. But things may well be on the upswing with the arrival of Sandro Romano.
Chef Romano in his kitchen
Chef Romano was at The Modern, the wildly successful Danny Meyer restaurant at the Museum of Modern Art for 8 years.  To salute his arrival, Florence Fabricant of the New York Times approached the chef for a recipe to complement an article on Greek wines.  The Chef came up with a recipe for Branzino with a semi-warm arugula sauce that the roasted fish sits on.  It has the bitterness of arugula combined with enough citrus to give the sauce some acidity which is very complimentary to the floral quality of Greek wines.  And it’s a breeze to make, taking all of 40 minutes from start to finish.

Monday, April 29, 2013

Sauteed Trout with Lemon-Chile Butter adapted from Food and Wine Magazine


Sauteed Trout Photo Courtesy of Food and Wine Magazine
Brook Trout 
I try to serve fish once a week.  Its health benefits are well known and even its fat content is healthy—it comes in the form of Omega-3 fatty acids which not only protect your heart, they also raise your good cholesterol level.  And almost nothing  is as easy to cook in as little time as a piece of fish.  I don’t know if you’ve noticed but salmon and tuna prices are hitting the roof—especially if you’re like me and prefer wild-caught fish.  So you can imagine how pleased I was to discover that Trout is amazingly affordable.  I bought a whole fish for $9.20, which the fishmonger filleted and skinned for me to give me the two beautiful filets I needed.  I had to break my rule against farmed fish but I learned something about trout fish farming in the process.

Sunday, January 27, 2013

Haddock with Fennel-Tomato Sauce And 8 Reasons we should all eat more fish.


          We should all eat more fish.  Further down the page you’ll find a list of eight reasons why. But there seem to be an equal number of reasons people do not.  I was talking to my friend Barbara, an Ohio native, who never ate fish growing up.  They simply weren’t all that available.  Now she strives to eat fish because the health benefits are unavoidable.  But she put her finger on what fish she will and will not eat.  And it all came down to what fish smells like. Because the fact is the freshest fish does not smell fishy.  So if you do the sniff test no matter what fish it is, if it smells the slightest bit fishy, put it back, it’s not fresh fish. Luckily for us, New York is one of the world’s great seaports and great fish arrives daily.

Monday, April 16, 2012

Crispy Flounder with Pears, Endive and Meyer Lemon



         My friend, Eric Lemonides, owns Almond Restaurant in Brideghampton and a second Almond on 22nd Street in the City.  Last Monday, when I went to his Bridgehampton address for dinner, he told me that one of the great off-season successes he's had is his  "Meatless Mondays" menu.  His chef, Jason Weiner, and Jason's gifted sous chef have devised all kinds of meatless menus.  So today, in their honor, I send you a meal so that you too can celebrate Meatless Mondays.
But even if it's not Monday, if you are looking for a quick fish dinner, look no further than this recipe, from the appropriately named “Make it Tonight--Just 30 minutes to dinner, start to finish” in Fine Cooking magazine.  It combines pears and endive along with either sole, if you’re feeling posh, or flounder if you aren’t.  Either fish will do but the ingredients you really must have are the Meyer Lemons. You'll end up with a plate of sunshine in the middle of a early Spring night.  

Monday, February 13, 2012

Ottolenghi’s Salmon Steaks with Spicy Tomato Sauce



         Last summer, our great friend Michael came over to our house with a cookbook given to him by one of his favorite customers at the Bridgehampton Florist, which he co-owns with his husband, Jim. (Yes, that Bridgehampton Florist...viewers of the Barefoot Contessa take note).  “Plenty”(Ebury Press 2010) is the work of London’s Yotam Ottolenghi with a great assist from his Chef/Business Partner, Sami Tamimi.  The book bowled us over.  It is a marvelous collection of recipes entirely vegetarian and incredibly beautifully photographed.  Page after page enticed us to consider quinoa, pomegranates, and Bulgar.  But when it came time to fire up the stove and bring Ottolenghi’s into our kitchen, we landed on an Ottolenghi recipe from January’s Bon Appetit.  I’d apologize to vegetarians everywhere except that Yotam’s recipe for Salmon Steaks in a spicy tomato sauce needs absolutely no apology.  It’s deliciously satisfying, healthy as all get out and comes together in under 30 minutes.

Tuesday, December 20, 2011

Eric Ripert's Red Snapper with Sofrito



Chef Eric Ripert
       The weeknights leading up to Christmas are a time challenge to any home cook.  We all want to minimize the time it takes to get dinner on the table so that we can take care of everything else that's going on--shopping, wrapping, decorating.  And with our menus leaning towards rich foods and lots of them, I thought it would a great idea to introduce a fish dish to our 12 days of Christmas recipes.  This one has a lot going for it.  It is genuinely easy to make. It takes under 30 minutes to cook. It's light and wholesome and absolutely delicious.  And it has a great pedigree.

Monday, November 7, 2011

Eric Ripert’s Striped bass in Savoy cabbage with Bacon-Butter sauce


The dish and the Chef who invented it, Eric Ripert.
         I love it when Eric Ripert comes on the Today Show and performs his wizardry with fish.  I’ve featured one of his Today Show recipes before and it was a snap to make.  Of course, Chef Ripert manages to cram the entire cooking process into a fast-paced television segment.  This one clocked in at 3 minutes and 40 seconds.  I wish I could tell you that the dish actually came together that quickly.  But it doesn’t.  It takes about 45 minutes to make.  The results, however, are well the effort. The deliciously simple white flaky fish is perfect partner for the leafy green cabbage and the crisp Bacon and butter sauce.  And besides I think it’s the closest I am going to get to sampling Chef Ripert’s cuisine any time soon.

Monday, April 11, 2011

Bobby Flay’s Salmon Burgers with Hoisin Barbecue Sauce



       I like Bobby Flay.  For quite a few years, I worked above his ‘store’. That would be his highly successful Mesa Grill (102 Fifth Avenue (15-16th St), NYC  Tel: 212-807-7400). At Mesa, his take on Southwestern cuisine virtually introduced New York to the flavors of that part of the country.  Of course, along the way, he reinvented dishes left, right and center.  There were his scrumptious Blue Corn Pancakes with Barbequed Duck.   And then there was the spicy heat and sweetness of his Ancho Chile Honey Glazed Salmon.  So when I ran across Bobby’s recipe for Salmon Burgers in “The Best of the Best Cookbook Recipes” Volume 13 (Food and Wine Books, American Express Publishing Corporation 2010), I couldn’t wait to try them.

Bobby, Hands-On at one of the Palaces

        Lately, Bobby has started to build his own Burger Empire.  He has 5 Bobby’s Burger Palaces scattered around New York, New Jersey and Philadelphia.  Since they are nowhere near where I am, I cannot vouch for any of them but I do know that one my favorite burger chefs tells me Bobby’s Burgers are the real deal.  And Bobby knows enough about burgers to have written the cookbook that got him into Food and Wine’s “Best of the Best”.  It’s called   “Bobby Flay’s Burgers, Fries and Shakes” (Random House 2009) and you can buy it right here.  Oddly, however, while the book serves up the Salmon Burger recipe, Bobby’s Burger Palaces do not.  The burgers there are all Beef, Chicken and Turkey.  There’s not one seafood item on the menu. My guess is if enough people try this recipe, they’ll start asking for it next time they hit the Burger Palace. 
 
        To appreciate this dish, you really should go the whole nine yards. And please, this is a really simple recipe.  It just has a lot of ingredients.  The meaty salmon pairs beautifully with the sweetness of the hoisin sauce. And don’t leave off the spicy Asian influenced slaw.   The pickled ginger that tops it really sets it apart from ordinary cole slaw.  There’s nothing here that you can’t readily find in the Asian aisle in most supermarkets.  Hoisin itself is sometimes referred to as the ketchup of Asia.  It’s truly ubiquitous. And with the popularity of Sushi at an all time high, pickled ginger isn’t all that hard to find either.   Use your food processor to chop the fish. It makes life much simpler. Here’s the recipe: 

Recipe for Bobby Flay’s Salmon Burgers with Hoisin Sauce and Asian Slaw

For the Hoisin Barbecue Sauce:

Hoisin Barbecue Sauce Ingredients
2 tablespoons canola oil
2 large shallots, coarsely chopped
2 cloves garlic, coarsely chopped
½ cup hoisin sauce
2 tablespoons ketchup
2 tablespoons honey
2 teaspoons soy sauce
2 teaspoons fish sauce
1 tablespoon rice wine vinegar

For the Salmon Burgers
:

1 ½ pounds fresh salmon
2 tablespoons canola oil
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
4 hamburger buns, split; toasted if desired. ( I used 7 Grain buns but any hamburger bun can be pressed into service)




For the Slaw:

2 tablespoons canola oil
¼ cup thinly sliced pickled ginger, plus more for garnish (optional)
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
¼ small head of red cabbage, finely shredded
½ medium head of napa cabbage, finely shredded
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
¼ cup rice wine vinegar
2 teaspoons toasted sesame oil
3 tablespoons finely chopped fresh cilantro leaves
First, make the Hoisin Barbecue Sauce

Heat the oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat.
Add the shallots and garlic and cook until soft, about 2 minutes.
Add the hoisin, ketchup, honey, soy sauce, fish sauce, and vinegar and cook until heated through and slightly thickened, about 10 minutes.
Set aside to cool.
(The sauce can be made 1 day in advance, covered, ad refrigerated. Bring to room temperature before using.)
To make the Salmon Burgers

To form the burgers, cut the salmon into large pieces and then coarsely chop in a food processor. Do not overprocess. (Alternatively you can chop it by hand with a sharp knife.)
Divide the salmon into 4 equal portions (about 6 ounces each). Form each potion loosely into a ¾-inch-think burger and make a deep depression in the center with your thumb.
Place on a plate, cover with plastic wrap, and let chill in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes before cooking.
Meanwhile, make the slaw.
Heat the oil in a large sauté pan over high heat.
Add the ginger and garlic and cook, stirring once, until soft, about 1 minute.
Stir in the cabbage, season, with salt and pepper, and cook, stirring once, until slightly wilted, 3 to 4 minutes.
Remove from the heat and stir in the vinegar, sesame oil, and cilantro. Let sit at room temperature.
To cook the burgers, heat the oil in a sauté pan or griddle (nonstick or cast iron) until it begins to shimmer.
Season both sides of each burger with salt and pepper. Cook the burgers until golden brown on the bottom sides, about 3 minutes.
Turn over, brush with some of the hoisin barbecue sauce, and continue cooking until medium-well, about 3 minutes longer.
Place the burgers on the bun bottoms, drizzle some hoisin barbecue sauce over them, and top with the slaw.
Garnish with pickled ginger. Cover with the burger tops and serve immediately.

Serves 4

    

Thursday, January 6, 2011

Cioppino, the San Francisco treat


        My mother adored Cioppino, the fish stew with its roots in the North Beach neighborhood of San Francisco dating back to before the earthquake.  If you knew my mother, or for that matter, read this blog, you know that cooking was not Mother’s thing.  But if it were an easy recipe, one requiring as little time and attention as possible, and one that could reasonably be cooked in as few steps as possible, my Mother would latch onto it with an almost religious fervor.  So it was with Cioppino.  There is very little opportunity to make a bad Cioppino because it is probably the most flexible fish stew on the planet.  And it packs a wonderful punch of flavor in every bite.  The Cioppino I am sharing with you today tasted of the sea itself.  And then there was the richness of the tomatoes, the anise flavor of the fennel, and the bite-sized pieces of seafood brightened with a dash of fresh lemon juice.  Mother was right.  It’s hard to beat a great Cioppino. 

Monday, December 6, 2010

Honey Glazed Salmon with Sesame Green Beans



Mary Woltz of Bee's Needs in Sag Harbor NY
The East End of Long Island of Long Island is full of people doing wonderful things with food.  Among them is one my favorite people, Mary Woltz.  The North Carolina native has single-handedly invented “Bee’s Needs”, a source of wonderful honeys.  That’s right plural.  Because Mary’s ‘girls’, as she likes to call them, create quite different honeys depending on what’s in bloom in our little patch of paradise. 
Mary's table at the Sag Harbor Farmer's Market
There are three distinct tastes created in Mary’s Early, Mid and Late Season honeys.  She manages 100 colonies all on her own—with a little help from her Painter husband, Rob, at least at the Farmer’s Market.  She’s set up what may be the first Community Supported Apiculture program in the country.  In this program, members buy a “share” for $100.00 and for that we receive 12 jars of Mary’s honey, a tour of the hives and a wonderful newsletter.  What this means is that we have a wonderful supply of local honey that lasts a year.  I am always on the lookout for great recipes using honey—because we have so much and it is so good. 
If you want to know more about Mary, here’s a video where she talks about her girls and her bee-keeping.  Did you know that bees have a part in one in three bites of food?  Follow this link and you will learn more from Mary…http://thepeoplewhofeedus.com/?p=152

Monday, August 30, 2010

Grilled Swordfish with Lemon Aioli and Fennel



        Our friends Beth and Peter are with us from California for a few days and we’re anxious to share some of Long Island’s best with them. This will include the spectacular weather we’re experiencing, our glorious beaches—less crowded now that a lot of our summer population is already off to college—and, of course, the incredible bounty of great things to eat that we’re blessed with at this moment.

Monday, August 16, 2010

Red Snapper with Butter and Shallot Sauce



        The Silver Palate was an iconic and tiny little take-out shop that opened on the Upper West Side of Manhattan in 1979.  It was the brainchild of two women: Julie Russo and Sheila Lukins.  Two years earlier, Lukins, divorced from her husband and mother to two small children, had set up a catering operation in her apartment.  She lived in New York’s famed “Dakota”,  home to Lauren Bacall, Rex Reed and most famously and tragically, John Lennon who was assassinated outside its front door in 1980.

Tuesday, June 1, 2010

Red Snapper Filets with Merguez Sausage, Little Neck Clams and Romesco Sauce



You can’t sit down to write a recipe without wondering what constitutes out-and-out thievery.  There is no possible way that you yourself could invent something so absolutely new and startling that you could proudly call it yours and yours alone.   Everything has to have come from some knowledge that you picked up from someone or somewhere else.  But giving credit where it is due isn’t the way of some major talents in the food galaxy.  I can’t run this down but it sounds apocryphal enough to be true:  One of the greatest doyennes of cooking is said to have recognized so many of the recipes of a then younger upstart that she remarked ‘’she is a superb copier”.  But at what point are we not all copiers, superb or not? 
        One theory holds that if three ingredients are different, whatever recipe it is, is therefore original.  Another is that as long as you attribute your recipe to its original developer, you’re covered.   I suppose if you went back to the very beginnings, you’d have to give credit to the man who invented fire or discovered that you could boil water.  But if you go to the rules governing Recipe contests, here’s what you’ll find:  Changing one or two ingredients in someone else’s recipe does not make it original.  And if you have the temerity to change the ingredients and still lift the instructions for the recipe from whatever it is you made the substitutions to, that isn’t originality,  it’s plagiarism.  And while recipes cannot be copyrighted, cookbooks most certainly can.  Which brings us to the great Alfred Portale, who must be given a lot of credit for the Snapper recipe here. 



Monday, May 10, 2010

Salt and Pepper Salmon with Smashed Potatoes, Peas, Lemon, Pearl Onions and Mint



I’d go back to Ireland in a New York minute, but it wouldn’t be for the food.  Aside from a wonderful Thanksgiving feast that we prepared ourselves, a dinner at Fallon & Byrne in Dublin and an Irish Breakfast at Merv Griffin’s St. Cleran’s Hotel, we basically had dreadful food.  So imagine my surprise at discovering that when Tyler Florence was working on the recipe for Salt and Pepper Salmon, his reference point was “Colcannon”.  According to LaRousse, “Colcannon” is “a very popular Irish dish made from mashed potatoes and green cabbage, mixed with butter or milk and strongly flavored with chives, parsley and pepper”. 

Thursday, March 4, 2010

Bouillabaisse with Garlic Aioli and Croutons

           
 When I want to cook something as well known as this dish, I love to haul out the cookbooks that contain the recipe and read all of them before I do anything else.  Almost inevitably, when it is a signature dish such as Bouillabaisse, you’ll find as many recipes as you have cookbooks.  That was the case here.  Everyone from Patricia Wells to Anthony Bourdain had a different opinion on what fish to use.  
But leave it to Julia Child, in “Mastering the Art of French Cooking”, to remind us that Bouillabaisse is, at its heart, just a simple Provencale fish stew. It was, according to Larousse Gastronomique, first cooked on the beaches near Marseilles over a wood fire. Its cooks were fishermen who added the least marketable of their catch to an aromatic cooking broth and served it over a piece of bread. Interestingly, the word “Bouillabaisse” refers to the method of cooking rather than an actual recipe. “Bouiller” (to boil) is combined with “Abaisser” to reduce.  And since the classic Mediterranean fishes associated with the dish—rascasse, congre, and rouget—don’t swim off Long Island, where I was cooking, my Bouillabaisse was never going to authentically Marseillais. And whose recipe did I end up with?