HELPING FAMILY FARMS FLOURISH. HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY.
Showing posts with label Gluten-Free Recipes. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Gluten-Free Recipes. Show all posts

Thursday, April 11, 2013

Peppermint Patty Flourless Chocolate Cake...And yes, it's Gluten-Free!


Peppermint Patty Flourless Chocolate Cake decked out for Easter


        
One of my oldest and dearest friends, Michael, was the first person I ever met with Celiac Disease, the root cause of which is gluten.  He suffered terribly through college, fearing the worst and not being diagnosed until after we’d graduated and he’d moved to London. Never one to sit on his hands, he attacked his condition with wonderful gluten-free meals.  He’d always been a good cook, and he swung into overdrive and ended up writing a wildly successful Gluten-Free Cookbook called “Great Healthy Eating Gluten Free” (Carrol & Brown 2000).  With over 50,000 copies sold, it’s now out of print but you can pick it up used on Amazon.  Now he shares his words of wisdom on his website http://www.gluten-free-world.com/ as he writes “Global Gluten-Free”, his foray into International gluten-free cooking. Michael has commented that not many recipes on Chewing the Fat are Gluten-Free.  He’s not wrong. But here’s one for him.

Thursday, March 14, 2013

Indian-Spiced Chicken with Chickpeas and Spinach adapted from Bon Appetit



         While we're all anxiously awaiting Spring, Winter weather is still in our forecast.  Cold temperatures and Indian-inflected dishes seem made for each other.  This dish, which appeared in last month’s Bon Appetit, really drives that point home.  It’s a rich stew full of the aromas of the sub-continent but without most of the heat that gives Indian food its reputation for spice.  It’s all in one pot and if you serve it with Naan, that’s all you’ll need.  But Basmati Rice would make a great accompaniment too.   I’ve been a fan of Indian cooking ever since I was kid and working in London for a summer.  Believe it or not, the British national dish is said to be Chicken Tikka Masala, a colonial era import from, where else, India. One thing that seems universal in how Indians prepare chicken is that they inevitably skin the bird.  Since I find this a very tedious thing to do, I was pleased to see that our local Whole Foods sells skinned chicken parts.  Not just any chicken parts either but air-chilled chicken parts! (To see why that is important you only need read   http://www.chewingthefat.us.com/2012/09/vinegar-braised-chicken-on-bed-of-leeks.html.)  But as to why Indians always skin their chickens, I went to an expert.

Monday, December 31, 2012

Nathalie Dupree's Mississippi Caviar from "Mastering the Art of Southern Cooking"



         Of this year’s cookbooks, “Mastering the Art of Southern Cooking” by Nathalie Dupree and Cynthia Graubert (Gibbs Smith 2012) is at the top of every list of the year’s best.  I’ve already shared the story of my sideways connection to Ms. Dupree in an earlier post: http://www.chewingthefat.us.com/2012/11/skillet-lemon-chicken-with-spinach-and.html. I’ve barely skimmed the surface of this fascinating book and it’s 600 plus recipes.  Now, with New Year’s Day approaching, I want to share another of Nathalie’s recipes, which is particularly timely.  And I hope it has the intended consequence. Because in the South, it's a hard and fast rule that eating black-eyed peas at New Year’s, the basis for Mississippi Caviar, will bring good luck and prosperity for all of next year!  So here’s our New Year’s gift to you!   And if you’re wondering how the humble black-eyed pea rose to such exalted status, you may be very surprised at the answer. 

Monday, August 22, 2011

Daniel Boulud’s Stovetop Lobster and Clambake



         I have to admit, I don’t publish a recipe that doesn’t turn out right.  My whole premise is that if I can cook it perfectly, you can cook it perfectly.  So with all the 200 plus recipes on Chewing the Fat, if you can follow the directions, you can end up with something tasty.  That being said, sometimes I completely hit one out of the ballpark.  And today’s dish is a home run from the first morsel you put in your mouth to the last bit of broth that you’ll zealously sop up with the last crust of baguette.  It is that good. 

Thursday, August 4, 2011

Andrew’s Flourless Chocolate Cake with the greatest accolade ever and a Meringue Topping to boot!



Roan and the Birthday Girl, Blythe.

         Andrew has quite the reputation for providing a great birthday cake.  Last weekend, he outdid himself by making three! Two were for a seventieth Birthday Party and one was for our lovely friend Blythe, who turned eleven. 
         The day after having a piece of this incredibly rich chocolate confection with its gorgeous meringue topping, Blythe’s 7 year old brother, Roan, was quoted as saying: “One of Andrew’s cakes is worth 10,000 birthday presents.”   Now if that is not a complement of the highest order, I don’t know what is.  But I do think it’s justified.  Andrew went all out on this one.      
         The author of this recipe, Sherry Yard, has an illustrious career. She’s the Executive Pastry Chef for Wolfgang Puck Worldwide.  As such she’s responsible for the sweet end of every meal at Spago, Chinois and Cut.  And for the celebrity mad among us, you may interested in knowing that her desserts are prominent features at the Academy Awards, the Grammy Awards and the Emmy Awards.  The Flourless Chocolate Cake recipe came from her second cookbook “Desserts by the Yard", (Houghton Mifflin 2007).
         The reason Andrew chose this recipe is that Blythe, Zoe and Roan’s mother, Monique has recently discovered that she is much better off eating gluten-free.  So in order for everyone in the family to enjoy Blythe’s birthday cake, Andrew went for a gluten-free recipe. Now if gluten-free sounds like a turn-off to you, you’ll be robbing yourself of an amazing treat.   
         Gluten-free is big these days because thousands of people have discovered that their tummy issues are linked to gluten, a protein that is commonly found in rye, wheat, and barley. Therefore, it is found in most types of cereals and in many types of bread. Not all foods in the grain family contain gluten. You’re safe with wild and brown rice, corn, buckwheat, millet, amaranth, quinoa, teff, oats, soybeans, and sunflower seeds.  

I’ve been aware of the gluten issue for a very long time. My college roommate, Michael Cox, went through agony before he was finally diagnosed with celiac disease which is a gluten allergy gone wild.   In the end, Michael became such an expert on the subject that he’s written not one but two Gluten-Free Cookbooks!  You can order them here. I likely should too since I just gave my copy to Monique.

Sherry Yard, meanwhile, writes “if there is one recipe in this book that you must make, this cake is the one.  High praise indeed!  She gives full credit to Charlotte, the owner of a tiny London restaurant called Charlotte’s Place which was across Ealing Green from the cooking school Sherry attended in London. All hail Charlotte!  Andrew offers one final word of advice.  This cake is only as good as the chocolate you use to make it.  So spring for the good stuff and stay away from low-end supermarket chocolate.  Here is the recipe:
Here's a high-sided (2 in.)
10 inch tart pan made
by "Fat Daddio's"--
How appropriate!
Recipe for Flourless Chocolate Cake with Meringue Topping courtesy of Sherry Yard
Equipment:  You must have a 10 inch fluted pan with side at least one inch deep or a 9 inch springform pan.  Anything less and the batter will overflow.





For the cake:

8 ½ ounces bittersweet chocolate, chopped or in pistole form (238g)

1 stick unsalted butter, cut into pieces (4 ounces or 112g)

5 large eggs

1 cup plus 2 tablespoons sugar (236g)

½ cup cocoa powder (20g)





For the meringue topping:

8 large egg whites (~240g)

¼ teaspoon cream of tartar

1 ½ cups sugar (315g)

1
. 
For the cake base: Preheat oven to 350F. Grease a 10-inch diameter tart pan (at least one inch deep) or a 9-inch diameter springform pan, place on a foil-lined baking tray, and set aside.







2

. Place chocolate and butter in a double boiler or microwave-safe bowl and heat until completely melted, stirring often to avoid scorching the chocolate.



3
. Meanwhile, place eggs in a bowl and run under warm tap water for a few minutes until eggs no longer feel cool to the touch. Crack eggs into the bowl. Add sugar. Using the mixer's whisk attachment, whip the eggs and sugar on medium speed until mixture is light and thick and falls in a ribbon from whisk - about 2 minutes.












4. 
Add cocoa powder and mix on low speed until combined. Add melted chocolate mixture and mix until well combined.



5. 

Pour batter into prepared pan, and bake for 12 minutes. Rotate tray front to back and bake for an additional 8-10 minutes, until surface of cake is just firm to the touch but still looks wet in the center and has a bit of jiggle. Place on a cooling rack and cool to room temperature.











6. 
For the meringue topping: Preheat oven to 375F. Place egg whites in the bowl of an electric mixer and allow whites to come to room temperature.

7. 

Continue whipping the whites, while adding the sugar little by little, until meringue is thick and glossy and stiff peaks form.



















8. 
Pile meringue onto cooled cake. Spread meringue to within an inch of the outer edge of the cooled cake base, twirling and fluffing the meringue into attractive peaks and curls.



















9. 
Bake in preheated oven for 12-15 minutes, until meringue is lightly browned. Serve directly from baking pan. Refrigerate leftovers.



Monday, August 2, 2010

Ratatouille with Fairy Tale Eggplant



      






If you’ve read much Chewing the Fat lately, you may remember David Falkowski, our local “Mushroom Man”, who supplies us with wonderful fresh and dried mushrooms at our local Farmer’s Markets. (You can read about these markets and David by on the most recent New York Times article here: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/18/nyregion/18dineli.html?_r=1&scp=1&sq=Sag%20Harbor%20Farmer's%20Market&st=cse). A couple of weeks ago, while we were at the Saturday morning market in Sag Harbor, we were visiting David’s table and there we saw some tiny little eggplants about 2 or 3 inches long.  David told us they were Fairy Tale eggplants.  He said customers were coming back weekly to buy more so he knew he had a hit on his hands.  The next thing we knew, there they were in New York magazine’s August 2nd Food section being extolled for their lack of both major seeds and any bitterness associated with their larger cousins.  We hustled home with ours and decided to make them the basis for the best ratatouille we’d ever tasted. 

Tuesday, July 20, 2010

Watermelon and Tomato Salad



        Last summer, we served a version of Watermelon and Tomato salad so often, we were convinced everyone we knew had tasted it.  And this year, we’ve seen so many recipes for it, that we’re sure our readers have been inundated with variations on the dish.  However, most versions we’ve seen include feta cheese, which is a complete no-no in our house.  It’s just not on our list.  This salad however most certainly is.

Tuesday, July 13, 2010

Chicken and Sausage Maque Choux



It never occurred to me to serve a stew in the summer.  But here’s how it happened.  I am getting ready to go out to the beach for some good long stretches this summer.  As the departure date approaches, I’ve been trying to pare down what’s sitting in the freezer. I have a confession to make.  Provided the food is well-sealed, you can keep stuff in the freezer far longer than anyone thinks you can.  But raw ingredients don’t fare as well as what’s been cooked.  And what I specifically had to cook were some Chicken thighs and sausage.  I did some research and came up with this recipe from Gourmet that’s about 10 years old.  Not only did it use my chicken and sausage, it was full of summer vegetables, a gorgeous colorful dish that was stew-like and very satisfying. 

Tuesday, July 6, 2010

Grilled Veal Chops, Tomatoes and Onions with Morel Cream Sauce



        I confess.  I don’t have that primal urge to grill every piece of meat I come across in the summer.  I don’t think every single thing tastes better when it’s emerged from a session with smoke and fire over charcoal.  I sometimes wonder if grilling is the obsession it is because it gets the man of the house to help with the cooking all summer long.  Then again, it does get you out of the house and keeps the heat out of the kitchen.  And my second confession is this: I think part of my problem with grilling is that I haven’t necessarily grilled the right way. 

Tuesday, June 1, 2010

Red Snapper Filets with Merguez Sausage, Little Neck Clams and Romesco Sauce



You can’t sit down to write a recipe without wondering what constitutes out-and-out thievery.  There is no possible way that you yourself could invent something so absolutely new and startling that you could proudly call it yours and yours alone.   Everything has to have come from some knowledge that you picked up from someone or somewhere else.  But giving credit where it is due isn’t the way of some major talents in the food galaxy.  I can’t run this down but it sounds apocryphal enough to be true:  One of the greatest doyennes of cooking is said to have recognized so many of the recipes of a then younger upstart that she remarked ‘’she is a superb copier”.  But at what point are we not all copiers, superb or not? 
        One theory holds that if three ingredients are different, whatever recipe it is, is therefore original.  Another is that as long as you attribute your recipe to its original developer, you’re covered.   I suppose if you went back to the very beginnings, you’d have to give credit to the man who invented fire or discovered that you could boil water.  But if you go to the rules governing Recipe contests, here’s what you’ll find:  Changing one or two ingredients in someone else’s recipe does not make it original.  And if you have the temerity to change the ingredients and still lift the instructions for the recipe from whatever it is you made the substitutions to, that isn’t originality,  it’s plagiarism.  And while recipes cannot be copyrighted, cookbooks most certainly can.  Which brings us to the great Alfred Portale, who must be given a lot of credit for the Snapper recipe here. 



Wednesday, April 21, 2010

Pear and Duck Confit Salad



        The Food Police were out in force when we posted our Easy Duck Confit recipe last Friday.  There were rumblings about our waistlines and heart health.   So I thought share some nutrition numbers to counter the impression we are on a road to hell in a hand basket.  There's both good news and bad: The good news: Duck meat and duck fat are both lower in cholesterol and higher in monounsaturated fat than butter, dairy fat or beef fat. While that is hardly a ringing endorsement, consider that one portion of Confit comes in at 260 calories, gives you 25 grams of protein, 0 carbs and 0 sugars and gives you impressive amounts of Vitamin E, iron and selenium.  And it was also endorsed by my great pal, Michael Cox, author of "Gluten-Free: More than 100 Delicious Recipes your family will love", because it is...Gluten-Free! 

        Now I will grant you that at 18 grams of fat, this is not a dish Weightwatchers is going to endorse anytime soon.  But in moderation, which is the way we eat everyday, I think we can enjoy this tender, rich and succulent dish in small doses and this salad certainly qualifies there.  
       
 Hopefully, you took our advice and made extra Duck Confit over the weekend.  If not, consider doing so this weekend and come back when you're ready to make this terrific dinner salad -- full of the goodness of fresh pear, crunchy pecans and gorgeous greens and the (optional) blue cheese.