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Showing posts with label Grace Parisi. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Grace Parisi. Show all posts

Friday, April 5, 2013

Cazuelas de Atun y Farfalle from Grace Parisi in Food and Wine Magazine



         What’s in a name?  Plenty.  Today’s dish is an homage to Spain which may not need much homage as it has firmly planted itself on the New York restaurant scene.  I count no fewer than 42 tapas restaurants in Manhattan alone on http://spanishtapasnyc.com/. But if you want something really Spanish, I suggest you head there. Because this dish has its roots firmly planted in the US of A.  It was a mainstay in many a household when I was growing up.  It was prized for its simplicity and the speed with which it could appear on the dinner table. So if Spanish isn’t your strong suit, here’s the translation: Tuna Noodle Casserole.  But would you have stopped to read a post about Tuna Noodle Casserole?  I didn’t think so. 

Thursday, March 28, 2013

A Top 10 Winner! Linguine with Creamy Tomatoes and Shrimp



Scott Conant, Chef and
Pasta Tester 
           After I’d made this dish, it came as no surprise to learn that Food and Wine had named it one of 10 Best Pasta dishes when it first appeared in 2010.  Judging the 10 Best were several chefs not known not known to be pushovers – especially in this category.  All three had been named Best New Chefs of the year. There was Scott Conant of Scarpetta in New York and Miami, a chef known for his particularly strong background in pasta cooking. What he may even be better known for is his appearances on the Food Network show “Chopped”.  There, he will figuratively run a contestant out of the kitchen if raw red onion appears on any plate put in front of him.   He was joined at Food and Wine’s judging table by two other chefs who know their way around an Italian kitchen:  Mark Vetri of Vetri and Osteria in Philadelphia and Michael Schlow of Radius and Via Matta in Boston. 

Thursday, December 13, 2012

Chicken, Sausages and Sage: One dish cooking at its best.

In the roasting pan, a one dish wonder!


         The bones for this recipe came from a famous English cook and television personality who shall remain nameless.  It’s not that I don’t devour the prose in the cookbooks the chef’s written.  It’s beautiful and seductive.  But when it comes to the recipes I’ve tried, I am sure the chef in question would request anonymity.  In my experience, they’ve led to some seriously flawed dishes.  A curry that was swimming in more liquid than Lake Ontario comes immediately to mind.  A cake that collapsed, on not just the first attempt at baking it, but the next as well.  I am not sure what the cause is.  Translating metric ingredients into cups and ounces?  Un-tested recipes?  So you may ask why then would I tempt fate again?  I was seduced by a photograph showing deeply golden chicken and perfectly browned sausages.   The dish not only looked fantastic, it had been vetted at the kitchens of Food and Wine Magazine under the supervision of the great Grace Parisi, for whom I have undying respect.  So I tossed aside worries about its principle author and made it for a Sunday supper, adding a few ideas of my own.

Thursday, September 13, 2012

Vinegar-Braised Chicken on a bed of Leeks and Peas adapted from Grace Parisi of Food and Wine Magazine with Heirloom Tomatoes and Burrata




      Ms. Parisi

                              Last weekend, I wanted to start to move away from summer favorites and start enjoying some of the pleasures of fall. For me this means a great braise with a flavorful sauce. I found one in this amazingly light stew, a medley of leeks and the greenest of peas topped by crispy-skinned chicken cut up so everyone can choose their favorite pieces.   With this, I kept late summer on the table with an Heirloom Tomato and Burrata. They yielded a dinner that is so simple to make and takes so little time, Grace Parisi, Food and Wine’s Senior Recipe developer and one my culinary heroes, uses it for weeknight dinner parties. The chicken is browned, the sauce given the tang of a shot of white Balsamic vinegar and then enriched with crème fraiche. The tender leaks and sweet peas contrast subtly with the sauce. The whole effect is a wonderful cross between sweet and tender, tangy and creamy.   After 25 minutes in a hot oven, it’s ready to be served which I did straight from the pot. It’s a triumph of French bistro cooking and if anyone knows how to cook Chicken, it’s the French. But first, about that chicken and those heirloom tomatoes. 

Monday, October 24, 2011

Curry-and-Yogurt-Braised Chicken adapted from Grace Parisi of Food and Wine Magazine



Food and Wine's
Grace Parisi
         We love a good curry at our house.  It’s warming and satisfying on all levels.  This particular recipe is the product of that master chef at Food and Wine magazine, Grace Parisi.  What Grace has achieved here is a melding of flavors that would lead you to believe that the dish has been happily percolating on the stove for hours.  Actually, the whole thing takes a little over a half hour to make.  What you end up with is a creamy curry rich with the tang of Greek-style yogurt.  And Grace has blended in tomatoes, corn kernels, Serrano chile, ginger and curry powder for a truly flavorful dish.  Surprisingly, even with the addition of the Serrano chile, the curry comes off as mildly spicy with just enough heat to add interest.  I adapted this recipe slightly with some ideas I think are worth sharing.

Monday, October 3, 2011

Peruvian Steak and Potato Stir-Fry Or Lomo Saltado courtesy of Grace Parisi of Food and Wine



At the Mercado Central in Santiago,
you can dine on all the fresh seafood
 from the market...
even if you're not entirely sure what it is.

         I’ve had the good fortune to travel to South America several times.  But I have only touched down in Peru. On my way back from Santiago de Chile, our plane made a stop there.  I must confess that Chilean food left me a little cold.  The Chileans will basically eat anything that comes out of the sea. While that befits a country that is a sliver of land an average of 110 miles wide with a 2653 mile Pacific coastline, it leads to eating all manner of sea creatures. Many of these look strangely like barnacles.  In fact, I think it would be possible to eat an entire seafood dinner at the famous Marcado Central without being able to identify a single thing on your plate.  The only meal I relished in Santiago was at a Brazillian steak house.  By the time we got there, I was dying for some bife.  I should have gone next door…to Argentina. Now there’s a country that is a fantastic place to eat – especially if you’re mad for meat.  I am a complete carnivore but after my last trip, I had an appointment with my cardiologist who asked what in god’s name I’d been eating.  Apparently I’d had at least one beef empanada too many.  But when I saw this recipe for a dish with Peruvian roots, it had some important things to recommend it.

Monday, May 24, 2010

Coriander Dusted Roast Beef




When I was growing up in Canada, Sunday was almost invariably the day when a giant roast beef would appear at the dinner table surrounded by crisp, brown roasted potatoes.  My personal preference was to eat as much rare roast beef as my father would give me.  And I also loved to consume the crisp layer of fat on the roast. Heavily salt and peppered, it was among my favorite things to eat.  How my arteries survived the amazing amounts of beef fat I consumed before I left home, is likely some kind of medical miracle.  But once out of the house, a roast the size of the one consumed by my family, was relegated to major holidays, Christmas in particular.  This was nothing about eating healthier, it was much more a matter of economics.  It was just too rich for my blood.  Then along came this recipe from Grace Parisi.

Wednesday, March 17, 2010

Korean Wings and Carrot Pineapple Salad



I thought about throwing my Chicken Wing recipe into the mix in time for Super Bowl Sunday.  But then I was inundated with Wings recipes: 10 in an email from RecipeZaar, another 8 developed by my heroine, Grace Parisi, in this month’s Food and Wine.  The world, I decided, did not need another Wings recipe. That was, of course, before I cooked mine.


Monday, January 11, 2010

A Quick and Easy Weeknight recipe: Orecchiette with a Veal, Caper and White Wine Sauce.




There are plenty of people I’d love to spend time cooking with:
My heroes like Tyler Florence, who seems to make everything I like.
Ina Garten, who makes everything look so effortless.  Thomas Keller who makes everything look well, so, complicated.  But I’d have to say that Grace Parisi is near the top of my list.   And this fantastic recipe is a reason why all by itself.