HELPING FAMILY FARMS FLOURISH. HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY.
Showing posts with label Italian food. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Italian food. Show all posts

Monday, June 23, 2014

Paola's Carnegie Hill Restaurant NYC and a recipe for Pasta con Asparagi (Pasta with Asparagus)



Paola's Restaurant 
1295 Madison Avenue at 92nd St. NYC
Tel: (212) 794-1890

Reservations and Information: www.paolasrestaurant.com


Paola's Pici con Asparagi         

Not too long ago, I was early for a lecture in Carnegie Hill, a family-friendly East Side Manhattan neighborhood known to tourists by another name: Museum Mile.  The Guggenheim and the Jewish Museum are right there. And later this year, the long-awaited reopening of The Copper Hewitt National Design Museum will draw even more people to Carnegie Hill. Though New York’s # 1 tourist attraction, The Metropolitan Museum, is outside its boundaries, it too is within easy walking distance.  Carnegie Hill, I was about to discover, is also home to Paola’s, an ode to Italian cooking that’s the very definition of the perfect neighborhood restaurant.  But in this case, it’s a neighborhood place that’s worth a detour for anyone who wants to indulge in some great food.  It’s created by a truly original Chef who never stops inventing and re-inventing everything that makes her restaurant so popular.

Monday, September 23, 2013

Two Ravioli Recipes so simple, I'm almost ashamed of myself: Lobster Ravioli with Creamy Tomato Sauce and Cheese Ravioli with Black Truffles and Mushroom Sauce

Lobster Ravioli with Creamy Tomato Sauce  
Cheese Ravioli with Black Truffles and Mushroom Sauce
Eataly's selection of fresh, stuffed pasta
is hard to beat.
One day I hope I’ll become wildly proficient in making my own Raviolis.  For the time being however, I keep thinking back to my Mother.  On the subject of store-bought substitutes for anything she didn’t have to make herself, she was wildly enthusiastic.  If you knew my mother, if only on this blog, you will remember that her philosophy was to spend the barest amount of time in the kitchen to maximize the time she could spend at the cocktail hour.  She was bold-faced about this and prone to saying things like: “If that little man at the Italian market makes ravioli, why on earth would I?  I mean, he would go out of business if all of sudden everyone started making ravioli.  And I would never want to be a party to that.”  So she kept the Italian market in business.  I suppose all I am doing here is picking up her torch, so to speak.   Besides, I very much doubt I can do raviolis better than the ones I’ve bought.  No surprise that the raviolis at Eataly, the massive Italian food market at Fifth Avenue and 23rd St., are ne plus ultra.  But I don’t turn up my nose at the Fresh raviolis at Fairway. The cheese ravioli featured in today’s post came fresh from King Kullen in Bridgehampton.  The lobster ravioli came from the shelves of Trader Joe’s.  Now you do have to make a sauce, which would have unnerved my mother.  But as I have long since given up two martinis before dinner, I find the sauce about as easy it gets when you’re getting dinner on the table.

Thursday, May 9, 2013

Herb-Butter Roasted Chicken with Tuscan-Style Bread Salad adapted from Chef Ryan Hardy in Food and Wine Magazine




Sometimes when I write a post, the food gods seem to be hovering overhead.  This recipe came to my attention when it was posted as a great idea for a Mother’s Day meal. Talk about timely.  Mother’s Day is Sunday, May 12th this year.  Since presumably Mother will be given the day off, it will fall on some lesser cook’s shoulders to make a meal that any mother could love.  So right off the bat, you know this recipe cannot be terribly complicated.  Dear old Dad should be able to pull this one off whatever his level of kitchen competency.  If that’s not enough of a reason to make this dish, perhaps your ears will perk up when I tell you it’s the invention of a Chef called Ryan Hardy.   Chef Hardy, I have since found out, is about to open one of New York’s most anticipated new restaurants. The James Beard Award nominee's new place is  called Charlie Bird and it will open on May 15th, at 5 King Street in Soho.   Since it won’t yet have opened, there’s no taking Mother there for her big day.  But anyone can celebrate with this dish.   It looks like you’ve gone to a lot of trouble, but in truth, it’s not hard to pull off at all.

Monday, May 6, 2013

Nigella Lawson's Meatzza



        
I’ve hesitated to post this recipe. I worry that it comes dangerously close to Frito Pies or one never-to-be-forgotten summer camp dish: corned beef hash and canned corn mashed up together in a frying pan and covered in ketchup.  That’s not to say both weren’t delicious--especially if you were hungry teenager on a camping trip.  Although we like to think that as we’ve aged, we’ve outgrown these kind of campfire concoctions, we were drawn to "Meatzza".  It's from Nigella Lawson’s latest cookbook, "Nigellissima” (Clarkson Potter 2012). “Meatzza”, as you can likely guess, contains some elements of Pizza. Pizza is my idea of the perfect food because it hits every element in the pyramid--protein, dairy, vegetable and those carbs in the crust.  That alone might make me want to try "Meatzza".  But to choose it as the first recipe out of the 120 Ms. Lawson’s 8th cookbook contains, requires some further explanation. 

Thursday, May 2, 2013

Pork Chops Scarpariello adapted from Gourmet Magazine



        
Italian Immigrants bound for the US.
Notice the preponderance of men.
If you frequent good old Italian-American Red Sauce restaurants, you may be well acquainted with a close cousin of this dish: Chicken Scarpariello.  Its origins, however, are not in Italy but in an Italian American kitchen.  Its name, “Scarapiello”, means “Shoemaker”.  If your imagination takes you to an immigrant shoemaker coming home and making this for dinner, you may not be far off base.  When Italians started immigrating to this country from 1890 on, very often the men went on ahead leaving their wives and children behind until they’d established themselves.  Many early Italian immigrants were barely educated and the early waves were full of laborers and, less often, artisans like shoemakers.  The Italian men latched onto ‘padrones’, immigrants who had arrived a few years earlier.  These men handled lodging, savings and work, giving farms and factories a constant labor supply.  Interestingly, around 50 percent of Italians who immigrated to this country from 1900 to 1920, saved all the money they earned and re-patriated to Italy.   These men never even learned the most rudimentary English.  They pined for their homeland and did everything they could to duplicate the cooking of their wives and mothers back in Italy.  “Scarpariello” is one example.

Thursday, February 21, 2013

Ina Garten's Italian Wedding Soup and her recipe for Chicken Stock



         Winter weekends are just made for hearty soups, especially on those days when you are dodging snowflakes or stuck indoors because the weather’s just too cold.  So when I found myself shut in during the Great Blizzard of ’13, I pulled out the cookbooks on the hunt for a great soup.  Now Italian Wedding Soup is a staple on many a soup board in New York.  For some strange reason, I’d never eaten it.  But with its comforting chicken broth, its tiny pastas and robust meatballs, and its good-for-you vegetables, it seemed like the perfect thing to serve for a Saturday supper.  And the perfect place to find a recipe for it is from Easthampton’s own, Ina Garten.  The recipe, from Ina’s 2008 classic “Back to Basics” (Clarkson Potter), is none too labor intensive—if you don’t count the part about making your own stock.  But stock-making on a cold day is almost therapeutic. I’ve included Ina’s own recipe for Chicken stock after the Wedding Soup recipe.  Since I did go ahead and use homemade stock, I can’t vouch for a version without it. But supermarket broth is certainly an option.  Just let me know how it tastes!

Monday, October 8, 2012

Mario Batali's Ziti with Tuna and Salami



         I love pasta and I am always on the lookout for a new and different way to prepare it.   There are sauces that require hours on the stove and that are best made in huge batches. “Bolognese” falls into that camp. Whatever the recipe, there is something so entirely comforting about a pot of “Sunday gravy”, which is what many New York Italians still call their grandmother’s spaghetti sauce.  Stewing away on the stove all day, it requires an occasional stir and multiple tastings and sends out aromas that perfume the air with oregano, tomatoes and basil.  When it finally makes its way to the table, the anticipation has been cooking right along with it all day.  There’s inevitably enough left over to freeze or simply hide away in the fridge for a weeknight second helping. 
      Then there are the sauces that come together quickly enough to make a perfect weeknight dinner.  There are quite a few of these if you look under Pasta in our recipe list.  We lean heavily on the classics –Carbonara, Linguine with Clam Sauce, Linguine with Lemon Garlic Shrimp (better known as Shrimp Scampi).  But when I found this recipe from the incomparable Mario Batali, I’d never heard of any pasta dish like it.  And this is from someone who lived in Italy.   It’s from the Chef’s “Simple Family Meals”  (Harper Collins 2011).  Once I made it, I loved it. The dish blends the taste of very high-end canned tuna with the spicy counterplay of salami and red pepper flakes all wrapped up in a simple onion-y tomato sauce.  Extra points go to the ease with which you can make it.  It’s one of those under 30 minute wonders which deliver far more taste than their cooking time would indicate.   But I was still puzzled that I’d never heard of anything like it.  So I went to google.it to see if I could find the roots of Chef Batali’s creation.

Monday, May 14, 2012

Gemelli with Peas, Onions and Guanciale from DiPalo’s in Little Italy


  

Di Palo's is irresistible if you're an Italian food lover 
         I think I am on to the marketing secret of DiPalo’s, the venerable Italian Market in New York’s rapidly vanishing Little Italy.  I’ll get to that but first a little about Little Italy.  It’s getting littler all the time, crushed on all sides.  Squished by a vibrant and growing Chinatown on its eastern and western flanks, gentrified out of existence by uber-trendy NoLita (North Of Little Italy) neighborhood, the latest census data told us what we already feared.  There is not one native, born-in-Italy Italian in the entire zip code that encompasses what’s left of New York’s Little Italy. For shame!

Thursday, April 19, 2012

Mario Batali’s Pollo Agrodolce or Sweet and Sour Chicken a l’Italiano



         I was recently involved in a Television program.  Every time I used a phrase that was French, (as in the expression “A certain je ne sais quoi”), the director would stop me and ask me to translate whatever I was saying into English.  He claimed that no one in America would understand a word I was saying. So I spoke English.  But even there I got into trouble using certain words.  Apparently, no one in America knows what a ‘cynosure’ is.  Or ‘grommets’.  Or ‘clerestory’.  I once read that the New York Times is written for an 8th grade reading level.  So why should I have been the least bit surprised that in Food and Wine magazine's February issue, they'd renamed Mario Batali’s classic recipe for Pollo Agrodolce "Sweet and Sour Chicken".

Thursday, October 6, 2011

Orange and Olive Oil Cake




         For us, fall starts bang on Labor Day.  That’s it for Andrew being at the beach.  His real estate business in the city totally takes over his every weekend.  We will be lucky if he gets to Bridgehampton once between then and Thanksgiving.  This leaves me alone out there because, between Monte’s Ham and the blogs I work on, I need to be there at least every two weeks.  What it also does, is pretty well rule out having a fabulous dessert to take to fall parties.  Because I don’t really bake any more at all.  It reminds me of the old joke about the Limousine pulling up to the Plaza Hotel.  The chauffeur opens the trunk and removes a wheel chair.  He then opens the car door and assists a young man into the chair.  The boy’s mother follows and as they reach the hotel door, the doorman says to the mother; “I am so sorry your son can’t walk”.  The mother answers: “Can’t walk? Thank God he doesn’t have to.”  Can’t bake?  Thank God I don’t have to. Except recently I did and the results were really well received.

Monday, June 13, 2011

Pappardelle with Prosciutto and Orange adapted from Bon Appetit



        The Emilia region of Italy has long been considered the country’s gastronomic epicenter.  Similar to the position Lyons occupies in French gastronomes’ hearts, Bologna is said to be Italy’s gastronomic capital.  Given that such universally recognizable names like Prosciutto di Parma and Parmigiano-Reggiano hail from the region, to say nothing of Modena’s Balsamico and that most classic of meat sauces, Bolognese, Emilia’s reputation comes naturally. 
Bologna is called "La Grassa"
meaning "Plump" or 'Prosperous"
        The last time Andrew and I were in Italy, we hurtled through Emilia on our way from Venice to Tuscany.  Having gotten a late start, our plans to stop in Bologna for lunch were dashed. Due to the brilliance of Italy’s Autostradas which skirt the city centers, we never even laid eyes on the place.  I’d been there as a student but on a student’s budget I have no recall of the gastronomy.  In fact the only the thing I remember at all was that Bologna had a Communist mayor which, in those pre-cold war days, pretty much scared us  red-blooded North Americans off the place.

Monday, March 28, 2011

Pino Luongo’s Spaghetti with Sausage alla Carbonara via Florence Fabricant



There was a time when Pino Luongo was at the top of the food chain in New York’s restaurant world.   He arrived here from his native Italy in 1981.  And after a brief stint working for other people, he opened Il Cantinori (Tel: 212 673 6044) 32 East 10th St, New York NY 10003) in Greenwich Village.  He was basically responsible for introducing New Yorkers to Northern Italian cooking, specifically that of his native Tuscany.  And it took hold to such an extent, it looked for a time as if Red Sauce Italian cooking, the staple of Italian American Restaurants, was done for. 
Pino Luongo
I remember his Le Madre, long gone from 7th Avenue in Chelsea. It was staffed entirely by Italian women. Le Madre means The Mothers in Italian.  Whether they all were Mothers is questionable but the women brought homespun Italian home cooking to the table.  And it was wildly popular.  In working on this post, I read that over the years Pino has opened 16 restaurants.  But now, he is down to running one: Centolire (TEL: 212-734-7711) at 1167  Madison Avenue between 85th & 86th Streets. (I have a sneaking suspicion I know why: Years ago, I had a truly wretched experience at his Hamptons outpost for which we received neither an apology nor any acknowledgment. 
Nevertheless, when I saw a recipe that Florence Fabricant had adapted from a meal she’d had at Centolire, it looked intriguing enough to try. It combines the classic Carbonara replacing pancetta with enough sausage to make the dish hearty, and cheese and eggs to make it satisfyingly rich.   True to Mr. Luogo’s long-standing affinity for an Italian Grandmother’s unwritten recipes, Ms. Fabricant said she felt ‘at ease adjusting…to my taste.”  I, however, left her recipe intact. 
Recipe for Spaghetti with Sausage alla Carbonara, courtesy of Florence Fabricant.
Time: 45 minutes
1 pound sweet Italian sausage
1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon unsalted butter
1 medium onion, sliced thin
1 1/2teaspoons pepper
2 bay leaves
1/2 cup dry white wine
Salt 1 pound spaghetti
3 large eggs
1/4 cup pecorino Romano.


1. Remove casings from sausage. Using a knife, a fork or your hands on a cutting board, break meat into small pieces. Heat oil and butter in a large skillet. Add onion and cook on medium-low just until translucent.



2. Add sausage, mashing and breaking it up with a wooden spoon until it is uniformly crumbly and has lost its pinkness. Stir in the pepper and bay leaves. Add wine and cook until it has nearly evaporated, about 2 minutes. Remove skillet from heat and discard bay leaves. Season meat to taste with salt.

3. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Cook spaghetti until al dente, 6 to 7 minutes. Meanwhile, fill a large serving bowl with hot water or warm it in a low oven. Lightly beat the eggs in a small dish. Just before pasta is done, return pan with sausage to low heat. When pasta is done, slowly beat about a tablespoon of pasta water into eggs. Then drain the pasta.
4. Transfer sausage to warm serving bowl. Pour spaghetti on top and toss it with the sausage, slowly adding the beaten eggs. Add salt to taste and fold in the pecorino.
Yield: 4 to 6 servings.

Monday, January 31, 2011

Burrata and Tomatoes...two ways


     
  It’s been a really rough winter here so far and there are still 50 days to go.  But I found a couple of ways to conjure happier and warmer days.  This is thanks to the introduction of some delicious, ripe tomatoes that are widely available no matter what the weather is outside.  There are several varieties of Grape tomatoes to choose from. There are also small heirloom tomatoes that are equally good at putting summer on a plate in the dead of winter.  And to further the illusion, there’s beautiful, ripe Burrata cheese. And for Burrata fans fortunate enough to live near one, Trader Joe’s sells 8 onces of the cheese for $4.99 – enough for at least four salads or our second recipe for a Tomato and onion tart.
            For the past two summers, we’ve been using Burrata as a stand in for fresh mozzarella.  We love opening up the mozzarella-like exterior to reveal the luscious creamy center of the cheese.   In fact, it is cream because Burrata itself is made from both mozzarella and fresh cream. The outer shell is solid mozzarella while the inside is a mixture of both mozzarella and cream, giving it an unusually soft  and creamy texture.  The name “Burrata” actually means ‘buttered’ in Italian and one taste tells you why.   Served fresh, at room temperature, it is a perfect  partner to ripe baby tomatoes,  an excellent stand-in for the big boys of summer in the iconic Tomato and Mozzarella Salad.  That dish is an exceedingly  simple thing to put together as you will see here.  The second way to enjoy these wonderful flavors together requires a little more time.  It relies on roasting the tiny tomatoes and some onions then using store-bought Puff Pastry to make a tomato and onion tart that you then heap with fresh burrata.  The tart not only staves off the cold, it makes a perfect appetizer or a delightful side dish.
          Burrata, like all mozzarella, owes its existence to an Asian native, the water buffalo, first brought to Italy in the 15th century. Water buffalo milk is richer and higher in protein than that of cows, yielding 1.6 times more cheese. It doesn’t have the yellowish  pigment found in cow’s milk, so buffalo mozzarella is pure white. True Mozzarella is made with the milk of water buffaloes; in Italy this is a legal requirement, and a similar cheese made with cow's milk is called fior di latte or fiordilatte, and not Mozzarella at all.  In the US however, this cheese is often made with cow's milk and sold under the names of mozzarella and burrata.  This is precisely what the Trader Joe variety is made from.   I am not sure how they make it as white as it is.       
        Regardless of contents or national origin, these two recipes are so easy and so delicious, they really do put color and summer on your table in no time.  Here are the recipes:
Recipe for Baby Tomato and Burrata Salad
1 lb container of Grape Tomatoes, Cherry Tomatoes or Heirloom Baby Tomatoes, sliced in half
1 tbsp Extra Virgin Olive Oil  
Sea Salt
Freshly Ground Pepper
Fresh thyme leaves (Optional)
8 ounces fresh Burrata Cheese
1.   In a bowl, gently toss tomatoes, olive oil and, if using, thyme leaves together. 
2.   Divide among 4 plates. 
3.   Break open the ‘boules’ of Burrata and divide them evenly among the plates.  Sprinkle with sea salt and freshly ground pepper.  Serve at once.
Recipe for Tomato and Onion Tart topped with Burrata
1 large Spanish or Vidalia onion, thinly sliced (about 2 cups)

2 tablespoons olive oil

1 lb Grape, Heirloom or Cherry Tomatoes, halved

1/2 of a 17.3-ounce package Pepperidge Farm® Puff Pastry Sheets (1 sheet), thawed

8 ounces of Burrata

2 tablespoons chopped fresh thyme 
1. Heat the oven to 400°F.


2. Place the onion into a medium bowl.  Add 1 tbsp. oil and toss to coat.  Place the onion onto a baking sheet.  Place the tomatoes, cut-side up, onto another baking sheet and drizzle with the remaining oil.


3. Roast the tomato and onion for 25 minutes or until the onion is well browned.  Remove the onion from the oven.  Roast the tomatoes for 10 minutes more.  Let the onion and tomatoes cool on the baking sheets on wire racks.


4. Unfold the pastry sheet on a lightly floured surface.  Roll the pastry sheet into a 12-inch square.  Place the pastry sheet onto a baking sheet.  Prick the pastry thoroughly with a fork.  Arrange the onions on top of the puff pastry and then arrange the tomato pieces over them.  Sprinkle with the thyme leaves.


5. Bake for 15 minutes or until the pastry is golden brown and the cheese is melted.  Remove the pastry from the baking sheet and let cool on a wire rack for 5 minutes.
6.  Divide the Burrata into four even pieces and top the tart with them.  Serve at once. 



Thursday, December 2, 2010

Baked Rigatoni with Eggplant and Sausage, Parmigiano Cheese Bread and a Honey and Pignoli Tart that’s to die for.


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 Last weekend we had a post Thanksgiving dinner party.  Since everyone was pretty well stuffed with Turkey, we wanted something completely different -- a crowd-pleaser on a cold night.  So we went for a dinner that's 'tutto italiano' from main course to desert.  Now baked pasta dishes are a risky business.  Those giant pans of baked ziti come to mind. I remember going to a long ago dinner party when one wag, seeing that very dish on the sideboard, described it as being “like having dinner at Riker’s” (New York City’s jail).  But the recipe for Baked Rigatoni was intriguing because its author, Tyler Florence, not only has a last name in common with Italy but a very deft hand at making wonderful Italian Food.  What’s nice about this dish, from Tyler’s Ultimate series, is the way the top gets completely crusty while what lies beneath is layers of pure flavor—of mozzarella, sausage and eggplant and the pasta itself moist and delicious.  Served with a really beautiful green salad, this dish was a big hit.
Keith's Green Salad was a big hit
Accompanying our Baked Rigatoni, I made Parmigiano Cheese Bread.  Now my version is not specifically an Italian creation.  Bruschetta may be its cousin but most people consider this wonderful garlic-y, buttery invention as strictly American.  It’s relatively easy to make and it is wildly popular—we literally had a guest microwave a piece on his way out the door. 
Finally, Andrew topped off the meal with a truly wonderful and very Italian dessert.  It’s a “Crostata di Miele e Pignoli”, a honey and pignoli nut tart that combines a sweet and slightly salty filling with honey and pine nuts. Now this recipe has a great pedigree.  It is from Gina di Palma, whose “Dolce Italiano” is a treasure trove.  Ms. di Palma is the pastry chef at “Babbo”, Chef Mario Batali’s first big hit restaurant in New York.  Her cookbook is described as being ‘for those home cooks who, like Gina, lie awake at night in bed dreaming of the perfect dessert’.   I haven’t noticed Andrew losing sleep over his desserts and this one is so good, you wouldn’t.   Andrew described it as a kind Italian pecan pie.   I adore pecan pie but I’d have to say, I actually liked this better.  And we got to use our fabulous “Bee’s Needs” honey that’s made in the Hamptons by my friend, Mary Woltz. This pie, topped with a tiny scoop of Vanilla Gelato, was completely devoured by our guests.  Not one slice was left. 

Thursday, November 4, 2010

A Visit to Eataly yields a delicious Veal Pasta Sauce




        Eataly, in case you haven’t heard, is a 42,000 square foot grocery emporium that’s just opened at 200 Fifth Avenue.  And everything in it hails from or owes its existence to Italy from the on-premises cooking school to the rooftop beer garden.   The original Eataly opened in Turin in 2007.  At 50,000 square feet, the mother ship is even larger than this enormously impressive store in New York.  And Turin was followed by the opening of smaller branches in Bologna and Milano and even smaller ones in two locations in Japan.  The full name of the store is Eataly Alti Cibi which translates to “High Food”.  But think “Specialty Foods” and you get better idea of both the selection and the price points. 

Monday, October 25, 2010

Quick Chicken Parmigiano



        Who doesn’t need a weeknight supper they can get on the table in under 30 minutes?  This dish from Fine Cooking is a keeper.  It really was on the table in no time.  It’s got a lot of flavor and crunch.  It gives you the pleasure of fried food but it’s not.  It’s sautéed.  The secret here is Panko breadcrumbs.  These great Japanese imports are a terrific addition to any pantry.  They’re far superior to Italian breadcrumbs. You can even find them at Whole Foods in a whole wheat variety.  The other tip here is to use the recommended Muir Glen Fire Roasted tomatoes.  They really have a significantly better taste than ordinary diced tomatoes.  Of course, they’re organic but they’re only slightly more expensive than plain old diced tomatoes.  Then there’s the cheese.  Parmigiano is a staple at our house. I always have it on hand. 

Thursday, July 15, 2010

Porchetta, slow-roasted pork shoulder with Fennel Pollen, and a visit to Robert De Niro’s Locanda Verde



        Whenever I get called for Jury Duty, I’m always delighted to use the midday break to try out the neighborhood restaurants.  Criminal court means visits to Chinatown and what’s left of Little Italy.  But Civil Court is bang up against Tribeca, ever a hotbed of places I am dying to eat.  There you’ll find Locanda Verde in the Greenwich Hotel on Greenwich St. (377 Greenwich St. www.locandaverdenyc.com Tel: 212 925-3797.)  The restaurant hasn’t yet become as famous as its owner, Robert De Niro, but if they keep serving the Porchetta sandwich that Chef Andrew Carmellini makes there, it very well may.
       


Friday, April 23, 2010

“Pollo al Mattone”-- Chicken under a Brick





When I was doing some research for this post, I discovered that this method of cooking chicken is pictured in Etruscan frescoes.  Given that the Etruscan era ended roughly around 500 B.C., this is unquestionably the oldest recipe I’ve ever shared with you.  And it’s age explains why the translation of the word “mattone” is “paver” in English.   The Etruscans used a stone to weigh down the bird to both flatten it and make its skin extra crispy.  As you’ll see below, with no bricks around, I finally found a use for my free weights…