HELPING FAMILY FARMS FLOURISH. HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY.
Showing posts with label Jewish Food. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Jewish Food. Show all posts

Sunday, April 13, 2014

Martha Stewart's Pear Spice Bundt Cake



        
         This past weekend, Andrew finally made it out to the Beach for the weekend.  The Real Estate selling season in New York has made it just about impossible for him to take time here since President’s Day.  To Andrew, a weekend in the country means a chance to bake.  And Saturday he chose to make a cake that would make a wonderful addition to a Passover Seder or an Easter Dinner table. I know I'm too late for Passover but this is in time for Easter.  Ripe pears are combined with a set of spices to create a lushly moist, honey and brown-sugar cake that’s then topped off with two toppings: A cream cheese glaze with a hint of lemon and pear ‘chips’ that are as pretty as they taste.  It’s from “Martha Stewart’s Baking Handbook” (Clarkson Potter), her 2005 ode to all things sweet. 

Monday, July 23, 2012

Grandma’s Melt-in-your-mouth Moroccan meatballs and celery (Krafs ouel Kouari) from Lisa Elmaleh Craig’s “Grandma Elmaleh’s Moroccan Cookbook”, Uncle Earl’s and Cousin Kelly’s Moroccan “Quick Bread” and “Charissa”.



                  If you love food stories, this is a wonderful one.  It starts with Lisa Elmaleh Craig’s new book “Grandma Elmaleh’s Moroccan Cookbook” (Hesperus Press Ltd., London 2012).   The book takes us on one family’s journey through the ages until they came at last to the United States in 1939.  Like so many other Jewish families, the Elmaleh clan sought refuge here just before the outbreak of World War II.  Unlike many refugees, the Elmalehs were prosperous merchants who were soon living in a large house in Cedarhurst, Long Island.  There, Sarah Levy Elmaleh became renowned for her cuisine to the point where Craig Claiborne, the esteemed editor of the New York Times food section, hailed her with a headline any cook would envy: “Moroccan cooking that a sultan would envy”. 

Friday, December 31, 2010

Episcopalian Chopped Liver



        For my final Chewing the Fat post of the year, I wanted to share a recipe I developed about 25 years ago.  It appeared in Saveur magazine and if you google it, you’ll find it on several of recipe sites.  To me, what’s odd is that there’s no explanation on any of these sites that gives any indication of why it is called what it is.  The Saveur article gave the whole tale but neither the recipe nor the story (nor its author, by the way), made it onto www.saveur.com  So here is the tale and the recipe.  I just made it for our Holiday Open House and once again, it was a huge hit. 
“Among the delicacies of Jewish American cooking, chopped liver is surely one of the greatest.  Its ingredients are humble:  Chicken livers, onions, eggs, salt, pepper and schmaltz.  As anyone with a knowledge of Jewish American idiom will tell you, schmaltz and its adjectival schmaltzy  means something that is over-done, over-decorated, over-emotional, over-the-top.  Schmaltz is chicken fat.  And when you put it together with the other ingredients in chopped liver, you have an appetizer that is unquestionably over the top.   It is a marvelous taste, rich and satisfying and rivaling any great pate.