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Showing posts with label La Cucina Italiana. Show all posts
Showing posts with label La Cucina Italiana. Show all posts

Thursday, July 3, 2014

Smoked Prime Rib on the Grill, Roasted Tomatoes with Pesto and Tortini of Zucchini





       
The lovely and extremely
talented Elizabeth Karmel
T
he 4th of July is upon us and there's never a better time to fire up the grill and celebrate the joy of being an American.  And there's almost nothing more American than beef.  And today I am talking serious beef, not your hamburgers and sliders but a big beautiful rib roast.  And what could be more 4th of July than cooking this King of all Roasts on the grill. So today I repeat a post from our first year: It's a menu that celebrates the holiday with the beef served with some incredibly flavorful tomatoes and a zucchini recipe that turns every plate into a piece of art. What's exciting to me is that since I first wrote this post, I came to know the author of the Prime Rib recipe, Hill Country Barbecue's Executive Chef, Elizabeth Karmel.  Elizabeth may well be familiar to those of you who watch Chopped Chef where she's been regularly pressed into service as a judge.  It turns out that Elizabeth grew up with a great friend of ours. David has had the good sense to invite Elizabeth to the Hamptons for the weekend and with her arrival, his dinner parties have topped our list of most-appreciated invitations.  Her pimento cheese, her 7 layer salads and her artichoke and spinach dip are all ambrosial.  But even before I met Elizabeth, I fell in love with her grilled Prime Rib.
       Regular readers of Chewing the Fat have heard that I do not run outdoors on the first decent day and fire up the grill.  I have the grill pans to prove it.  As a matter of fact, it sometimes takes me a little while to bring the grill up to the deck from its winter storage place in the garage.  This is fundamentally because I do not feel in complete control of the Weber.  And to me, gas is out of the question because if you’re going to use a grill, surely half of the desired result is some smoky flavor to announce where whatever you’ve cooked has come from. But not too long ago, we were having quite a big group for dinner and I wanted to serve Prime Rib. 

Thursday, June 27, 2013

A melange of Asparagus and any Green Spring Vegetable you'd like


        
Asparagus season is here and we can’t get enough of the stuff. I’ve already served it in last year’s spicy stir-fry with chiles. http://www.chewingthefat.us.com/2011/05/spicy-pork-with-asparagus-and-chile.htmld. And then as a dinner salad that makes a meatless meal  http://www.chewingthefat.us.com/2011/05/spicy-pork-with-asparagus-and-chile.html and then of course, there’s roasted asparagus which can be served as a side dish,an appetizer or, adding an egg, a light supper: 
http://www.chewingthefat.us.com/2011/06/roasted-asparagus-with-lardons-and.html.  Now to add to our collection of asparagus recipes, comes this symphony of green.  It combines not only tender asparagus spears but Spring’s green beans or haricots verts, Fava beans or Edaname, baby peas—even lettuce if you’d like.  It started off as a recipe in La Cucina Italiana magazine entitled “Primizie verdi con scamorza e olio picante” or Green Spring Salad with Scamorza and Spicy Olive Oil.  You’ll notice there’s not one word about Asparagus in the name of the recipe.  But on closer inspection,
Asparagus was a key ingredient among several others. At a recent dinner party we gave, instead of offering up steamed, boiled or roasted asparagus exactly like everyone’s been eating it since asparagus season began, this gave us the chance to introduce it with several other Spring vegetables. The result is a side dish that looks like you went to an inordinate amount of trouble to make.  In fact, it’s amazingly easy.  And what I also discovered was this is an incredibly adaptable recipe and that you can use virtually any green vegetable you’d like.

Thursday, July 12, 2012

La Cucina Italiana’s Spaghettini in Little Neck Clam Broth with Cherry Tomatoes or “Umido di vongole con spaghettini e pomodorini”


Clamming, about as Long Island as you can get
         I am big fan of Linguine with Clam Sauce as our recipe search feature will confirm.  So when I saw this recipe for a variation on the theme in the July 2012 issue of La Cucina Italiana, I had to try it.  After all, the Little Neck clam, with which this lovely, light dish is made, is about as local as you can get out here on the East End of Long Island.  It’s especially appealing too because, unlike Linguine with Clam sauce, the recipe includes some great fresh vegetables --  carrots, leeks and tomatoes – and it’s light on the pasta.  In true Italian fashion, La Cucina lists it as a “Primo” or appetizer which is generally the role pasta plays in the Italian menu.  I served it as our main course.  It is a perfect summer pasta dish especially with those bite-sized morsels of heaven, the littlenecks.       
A Clamming Rake is as essential to digging
Little Necks as the beer which generally accompanies
Clamming on Long Island 

Thursday, June 14, 2012

“Trionfo di Fragole” Strawberry and Cream Cake


  
         The local strawberries on Long Island could not be more beautiful this year—even if they’ve arrived earlier than usual due to our incredibly mild winter.  There has to be some upside to Global Warming for more than just the population of Canada!  These berries were an inspiration to Andrew who latched onto a recipe from that favorite of ours, “La Cucina Italiana”, in their latest issue.  The literal translation of Trionfo di Fragole is “A Triumph of Strawberries” and quite honestly that really hits the nail on the head. This delicate sponge cake is light as air and lemon-y thanks to a liberal dousing with Lemoncello, the Italian liqueur.  The tart strawberries are mounted atop two layers of whipped cream.  Then, just for decoration, mint leaves adorn the center of the mass of strawberries atop the cake.  So the minute you can, do not walk, run to make this incredibly wonderful cake.  It is so delicious, I wondered how it got its name.

Thursday, May 3, 2012

Pork Cutlets with Pine Nuts and Prosciutto “Lombatine ‘Vestite’ ai Pinoli”


         Here we have a simple pork cutlet or chop that is covered with juicy bits of golden raisin, salty, tangy capers, and rich Gran Padano cheese.   This sweet and salty, cheese-y topping is held in place by crisp slices of prosciutto.  For a pork lover like me, the dish is just about perfection.
         I’ve mentioned my fondness for “La Cucina Italiana” magazine before.  The 83 year old magazine got its start in Italy in 1929.  The US edition is a Johnny-come-lately by comparison.  It launched here late in 2007.  The magazine has an American editor named Michael Wilson who somehow makes every issue like a trip to Italy. And it maintains its Italian-ness by keeping the recipe titles in Italian and translating them in much smaller type below.  Somehow that adds to the feeling that this is truly Italian cooking.  Features about various regions of Italy make for a good read.  Ingredient features like the current issue’s one on Italian Beer introduce you to the people behind the brews.  And two more, one on beans, the other on strawberries, give you more than enough ways to put authentic recipes on your table. This "La Cucina" even takes you outside the kitchen door with “Start an Italian Garden”. But hands down, one of my favorite sections is called “In Cucina” (In the Kitchen).  That’s where you’ll find “Cooking School” which gives you an in-depth understanding of cooking techniques.  But it’s “Cooking by the Clock” that inevitably turns me on.  Today’s post is no exception. 

Thursday, January 12, 2012

Chicken with Prosciutto, Chard and Pine Nuts


It's easy to see why it is called
Rainbow Chard
         I have significant lapses in my culinary adventures.  Before I made this perfect weeknight dinner with its amazing range of delicious tastes and textures, I had never cooked Chard.  I will not go so far as to say I had never eaten  Chard but it certainly has never been something I actively sought out of any menu I can remember. I imagined a bitter taste, something akin to some truly unpleasant experiences I have had with collard greens.  But in the spirit of locovore eating, nothing makes more sense in January than eating this very hardy vegetable. You can find freshly cut at Winter Farmer’s Markets. Mine, I confess, came straight from California via Fairway Market.  Hardly local but certified organic.

Thursday, January 28, 2010

Costelette di Maiale al sedano Or Pork Chops Milanese with celery salt


The reason I went all Italian on you was simply that I had seen this recipe in La Cucina Italiana, one of my favorite magazines, the copy of which I had left out at the beach. It appeared nowhere on their excellent website, www.lacucinaitalianamagazine.com. Thank goodness for google.it.com, the Italian version of the search engine.