HELPING FAMILY FARMS FLOURISH. HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY.
Showing posts with label Leftover Roast Beef. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Leftover Roast Beef. Show all posts

Monday, December 1, 2014

Cottage Pie with a hand from Tamasin Day-Lewis in Saveur Magazine

        
Growing up in Canada, the Sunday Roast was a tradition in our house.  An enormous piece of beef would appear on the dinner table and our extended family would dig in.  And it was almost always beef because my parents had no great affection for lamb or, heaven forbid, pork which could cause a disease called "Trichinosis", the very sound of which sent shivers up our spines.  So beef it was. In the week after the roast, my mother would make Shepherd’s Pie, which is what she always called it.  This is a really old English recipe.  The first time it was printed was in an anonymous writer’s cookbook in 1737 called “The Whole Duty of a Woman”. (Can you imagine the response that title would arouse today? )  Shepherd’s Pie has evolved since then. In the Victorian era, the hand-cranked meat grinder was introduced so that turning the leftover roast into minced meat was infinitely easier. Mixed with onions and, sometimes, leftover vegetables, the filling was then topped with mashed potatoes and reheated in the oven.  I loved it.  And it was a good thing because it was a weekly staple in our house for years and years.  But when Andrew and I got together he cringed at the very thought of Shepherd’s Pie.  Apparently when he was in school in England, in his own words, ‘you can just imagine how badly it could be made’.   But having already made hash with some leftover prime rib, I still had leftovers. I decided to prove him wrong.  But first I had to correct something wrong about my mother’s Shepherd’s Pie.

Thursday, October 30, 2014

Sheila Lukins' Roast Beef and Vegetable Hash


Today is Chewing the Fat's 5th Birthday!  Five years ago this very day we published our very first post!  We've been hard at it ever since.  Now, 526 posts and over 900,000 (!) page views later, we are celebrating this milestone with a request: Will you please go to the bottom of this page and tell us what you'd like to see more of, what you'd like to hear less of, and what we can do to make you want to come back time after time.  We really appreciated your viewership and we'd really appreciate hearing from you!  Happy Birthday! 
         It may come as a huge surprise to you, as it did to me, to know that the #1 most viewed recipe on Chewing the Fat is one for James Beard’s Roast Beef Hash.  (See http://www.chewingthefat.us.com/2012/01/james-beards-roast-beef-hash.html) With 16,439 page views, this recipe continues to be searched for on a daily basis.  To me this says three things: 1. Great recipes never die with the Chef who created them. 2.  There is clearly an extraordinary amount of leftover roast beef in this county at any given moment. 3. And despite the fact that the finished dish is almost impossible to photograph looking appetizing, its looks are no barrier to its popularity.        


With such a huge success on our hands, you’d think I would have abandoned any thought of trying to find another hash recipe at all.  However, I considered it a challenge to try to top or at least equal James Beard’s version.  That and the fact I too had a lot of roast beef leftover from a Prime Rib. Besides, Andrew positively loves hash.  Then I found a recipe from the late, great Sheila Lukins and gave it a go. The results were another hash that was in many ways as good as Beard’s and, with its colorful vegetables, a good deal more photogenic.

Thursday, January 2, 2014

Philly Cheesesteaks all gussied up...another way to use that leftover Roast Beef


         From the numbers of people who have clicked on James Beard’s Roast Beef Hash recipe just this week (1703 and counting), my guess is there’s a lot of Prime Rib leftover from our Holiday menus.  That’s the case here and after I’d made the hash, I still had a surfeit of delicious and wildly expensive beef.  I have a tremendous weakness for Philadelphia Cheesesteaks, which is generally satisfied by visits to a food truck that’s stationed right on the corner of our New York City street.  Their version is about as basic as you can get:  Thinly sliced beef goes on the flat top where it’s cooked till it’s grey.  Onions, mayo and green peppers are optional. Cheese Whiz is not.  The finished combination is loaded into a soft bun and handed over in a sheath of aluminum foil.  I can’t vouch for the legitimacy of the Potluck Café Truck’s  version. I only know they are my guilty pleasure about once a month. So as I stared at the remaining roast, I decided to see if I could make a reasonable facsimile of the original.  I ended up with quite a fancy version that might not fly in Philadelphia but which sure hit the spot.

Thursday, January 5, 2012

James Beard’s Roast Beef Hash


I just wish this looked as good as it tastes
You have just landed on the most popular post ever on Chewing the Fat.  It's been read over 16,000 times and counting.  But before you rush off and cook it, you might want to have a look at another hash recipe that celebrates the Fifth Birthday of Chewing the Fat.  You'll find it here:

Joe Beef's Veal Pojarski
This week, the New York Times’ Dining Section featured a front-page article entitled “Lucky to Be a Leftover”.   In it were some remarkable ideas from people all over who made meatballs from holiday hams (no recipe on that one and boy, did I want it!), to Veal Pojarski, made from diced roasted veal, pork or beef and a specialty of those two Montreal Chefs-of-the-Moment, Joe Beef’s own Dave McMillan and Frederic Morin.  The Montrealers go all the way to sticking a roasted bone in the resultant meatball.  The thing looks phenomenally good.  But to me, the best thing to do with the gorgeous centerpiece from our Christmas Day table, our standing Rib Roast of Beef, is to make Roast Beef Hash.

Thursday, November 17, 2011

Lillian Hellmann’s Empanadas


Lillian posed for Blackgama Mink
for which she was roundly criticized. 

The late Wendy Wasserstein
         Before you think I am fixated on Lillian Hellmann, Playwright, Author and Memoirist, I feel compelled to admit that you may be right.  Lillian Hellmann’s Pot Roast, which I shared with you earlier this month, opened the door to my reading “An Unfinished Woman” (Little Brown & Co. 1969)  This book was the first in what became a three-volume collection of memoirs.  The version that I read contained an introduction by the playwright; Wendy Wasserstein and I’ve leaned heavily on it to write this post.  Ms. Wasserstein’s tongue-planted-firmly-in-cheek commentary is hilarious.  She points out that in “An Unfinished Woman” Lillian reminisces about virtually every famous person you’ve ever heard of.  But what struck Ms. Wasserstein was the number of times that Lillian encountered these people just days before their demise.