HELPING FAMILY FARMS FLOURISH. HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY.
Showing posts with label Lunch Dishes. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Lunch Dishes. Show all posts

Monday, September 8, 2014

Galette of Late Summer Vegetables with (or without) Cheddar Cheese Ice Cream

        



Melissa Clark is one of my all-time favorite recipe makers. I look forward to her weekly columns in the Times one of which is called
“A Good Appetite”.   I sometimes think it also be called “Playing with Your Food” because Melissa treats her readers to any number of machinations and generally allows her followers free reign with her recipes.   And that’s exactly what I did with a recent foray Melissa took us on into the world of the galette.  A galette and its Italian cousin the crostata are free-form pastries that require no pie plate or tart pan. Instead dough is rolled out flat in something approaching a round shape, the filling is loaded on top and the edges of the dough are folded over the filling.  It’s completely undemanding and if filling oozes out of the side that’s all chocked up to the rustic charms of this particular offering.   Real butter is must when making the pastry and using the best filling you can find will turn out a gloriously golden dish that even the most novice baker can be proud of.   Andrew has shared his share of galettes and a superb crostata which you can find using the search function on the left side of this page.  But this would be our first savory version of the dish.  But I seemed to remember that pleasure of these was greatly increased when topped with a scoop of ice cream.  So when he and I made this one, I couldn’t help but wonder if that wouldn’t also be true here.  So I made Cheddar Cheese Ice Cream to top off our dish.  But first we made the galette.

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Roasted Shrimp Salad with Heirloom Cherry Tomatoes and Avocado


        Last Sunday, we gave a pool party for our god-daughter.  It’s an annual event to celebrate her birthday for the four of us who are called “The Uncles”.  Andrew and I and Terry and Shawn have watched Olivia grow up and we’ve been there for every birthday.  It’s the perfect time to break out the Rosé and the pool toys—this year a gigantic swan Olivia named “Gloria Swanson”.  It’s also the perfect occasion for this salad.   I was drawn to a recipe from Ann Burrell, the Food Network’s wild-haired woman who, it turns out, is a summer visitor to the Hamptons.  In her original recipe which appeared in Hamptons magazine, Ann used our perfectly ripe heirloom tomatoes as the basis for a shrimp salad.  I took off from there.  First, I have to thank Ina Garten, who, as almost everybody knows, lives in the next town over full time.  From Ina, I learned that roasting shrimp is the best way to capture all their flavor.  Far superior to boiling shrimp, roasting them seems to bake all the flavor into the shrimp.  The tomatoes were a no-brainer. 

The Comfort family farm down the road has baskets of heirloom cherry tomatoes and plenty of beefsteak tomatoes too which I put into action. Since Olivia loves avocado, Andrew and I peeled and sliced 3 ripe avocados into the salad.  The final touch in Ann Burrell’s recipe called for Black Volcanic Salt.  Fortunately, Williams Sonoma sells this rare salt in a finishing salt selection.  If you can get your hands on it, please do.  Otherwise you can be forgiven for using any large grained salt like Fleur de Sel.  This salad is so simple to make, so satisfying to eat and so beautiful to look at that I’d recommend putting that bag of Costco shrimp you’ve got in the freezer to work this weekend.  Here’s the recipe:


Recipe for Roasted Shrimp Salad with Heirloom Cherry Tomatoes and Avocado. Takes 30 minutes to make.  Serves 8.

1-2 lb bag of 31-35 count Shrimp, peeled and deveined, tails left on *
½ cup Extra Virgin Olive Oil
6 cloves of garlic, peeled and chopped
1 tsp. Crushed Red or Alleppo Pepper
2 pints of heirloom cherry tomatoes, halved
2 lbs. of ripe, red soil grown tomatoes
3 ripe Haas Avocados, peeled, pit removed and sliced into ½ inch wedges.
½ white or Maui onion, peeled and sliced very thin
12 large fresh basil leaves, cut into a chiffonade**
¼ cup red wine vinegar
Black Volcanic Sea Salt


1. Preheat the oven to 400 F.

2. In a small bowl, combine olive oil, chopped garlic and red or Aleppo pepper flakes.  

3. Place shrimp in a large bowl and pour olive oil and garlic mixture over them, making sure to coat all the shrimp with the mixture.

4. Put the shrimp on a single layer on a sheet pan.  Salt and pepper the shrimp and put them in the oven.  The smaller sized shrimp (31-35 count) will cook in 5 minutes.  Larger shrimp will take only slightly longer.  Do not overcook. Shrimp are done when they turn pink and are opaque all the way through.


5. In a large bowl, combine the tomatoes, onion and avocado and half of the basil chiffonade.








6. Remove the shrimp from the sheet pan and pour all the juices and garlic bits into the bowl with the tomatoes, onion and avocado. Add the vinegar and toss gently.
7. Arrange the salad on individual plates, top with shrimp and sprinkled with the remaining basil chiffonade and black volcanic salt over all.  Serve.

  
*You can use the larger sizes too 21-25 or 11-15 count.  Just adjust the roasting time upwards in 3 minute intervals.
** To make a chiffonade of basil leaves, stack 6 leaves on top of each other, gently roll them into a cigar shape and then use a sharp knife to slice them into thin ribbons. Repeat.  Stack, roll, slice and you’ve made a chiffonade.


Thursday, June 26, 2014

Martha Stewart's Cornmeal Berry Sheet Cake




 There’s a twitter feed called “Drunk Ina Garten” written by someone as a parody.  And every time I post an Ina Garten piece, the guy who tweets it picks up on it in about five minutes flat, re-tweets it and I get tons of hits from his readers.  Strangely, there doesn’t seem to be one for our other local legend, whom I would have to think, could be subject of more parodies than our Ina.  That local legend is none other than Martha Stewart, whose makes East Hampton one of her four homes all within driving distance of each other—except perhaps the one in Maine which is a private jet away.  I owe a geat deal to Martha and I am not embarrassed to say it.  Here is a woman who almost single-handedly restored the joys of home-making, crafting, entertaining, gardening and housekeeping. I see her influence all over my own house and garden. Despite all I owe Martha, when I occasionally see her out and about locally and I am invariably too paralyzed to say hello to the woman. 
          And then there is her considerable contribution to home cooking.  She is of the  devotees of “Cook Your Way Through Julia Child’s “Mastering the Art of French Cooking” School of Culinary Education.   And it has certainly served her well.  Now the provenance of her recipes is sometimes questioned. Unlike Ina who is forthright about what she learned from whom, Martha never attributes a thing to anyone but Martha.  I feel compelled to attribute posts from Martha’s recipes not just this week but for two weeks running. 

Monday, June 23, 2014

Paola's Carnegie Hill Restaurant NYC and a recipe for Pasta con Asparagi (Pasta with Asparagus)



Paola's Restaurant 
1295 Madison Avenue at 92nd St. NYC
Tel: (212) 794-1890

Reservations and Information: www.paolasrestaurant.com


Paola's Pici con Asparagi         

Not too long ago, I was early for a lecture in Carnegie Hill, a family-friendly East Side Manhattan neighborhood known to tourists by another name: Museum Mile.  The Guggenheim and the Jewish Museum are right there. And later this year, the long-awaited reopening of The Copper Hewitt National Design Museum will draw even more people to Carnegie Hill. Though New York’s # 1 tourist attraction, The Metropolitan Museum, is outside its boundaries, it too is within easy walking distance.  Carnegie Hill, I was about to discover, is also home to Paola’s, an ode to Italian cooking that’s the very definition of the perfect neighborhood restaurant.  But in this case, it’s a neighborhood place that’s worth a detour for anyone who wants to indulge in some great food.  It’s created by a truly original Chef who never stops inventing and re-inventing everything that makes her restaurant so popular.

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Savory Roasted Tomato Tarte Tatin


         I recently came across a very detailed recipe for a tomato Tarte Tatin in August’s Bon Appetit.  Now I used to make Tarte Tatins at every opportunity.  They were hard to beat: You put butter and sugar into a cast iron pan and it magically turned into caramel.  You added pears or apples skin side down, covered the thing with pastry and into the oven it went.  Once done, you cautiously fiipped the tart over and voila!  Your pretty pears or apples glistened on a bed of pastry.  Add a scoop of ice cream and you had a dessert that even I could make.  This was of course before Andrew took up baking. Now, if I made dessert, people would be convinced that I’d lost my mind.  But I couldn’t get the Tomato Tarte Tatin out of my mind. 

Sunday, July 21, 2013

Mushroom and Pepper Jack Tart with Long Island Mushrooms

         
Long Island Mushroom company is the brainchild of two Rhode Island natives who grew up in the same town, became High School Sweethearts, parted ways and re-kindled their romance thirty-two years later.  Jane Maguire and John Quigley are their names and Long Island Mushroom is their second act-–both personally and professionally.  The couple have taken to mushroom farming in a big way.  Their 6500 square foot growing space on the North Fork is packed with glorious
Left to Right: Shiitakes, Blue Oyster and
Miitake Mushrooms from
Long Island Mushroom
Shiitakes, Miitakes and Blue Oyster mushrooms, the perfect combination for creating “wild” mushroom dishes without foraging for them on your own.  You don’t even have to clean them.  That’s because they are grown without soil on pressed paper and sawdust logs that they couple brings in from ‘the mushroom capital of the US’, Kennett Square Pennsylvania.  They’re grown under strict temperature controls and in very high humidity.  Each log produces ‘blooms’ of mushrooms that are harvested simply by being snapped off.  Each log produces 3 crops of mushrooms in a 48 day period before being replaced.  With Jane manning sales and John keeping the farm growing, Long Island Mushroom has found its way into the top restaurant kitchens on the East End, including “The Topping Rose House” in Bridgehampton, Tom Collichio’s wildly successful foray into the Hamptons. 

Monday, July 8, 2013

Farmers' Market Salad with Buttermilk-Chive Dressing from "flour, too" by Joanne Chang


Our Farmers' Markets are brimming with more and more produce every week.  The carrots and beans, tomatoes and radishes are in and the Red Bliss potatoes are still baby-sized and beautiful.  So you can imagine my delight at opening Joanne Chang’s latest cookbook, “flour,too” (Chronicle Books 2013) and discovering the perfect recipe to put them all together.  Joanne Chang’s recipes are a regular feature on Chewing the Fat.  Pastry Chef Chang’s takes on classic American desserts from homemade Oreos http://www.chewingthefat.us.com/2012/03/joanne-changs-recipe-for-homemade-oreo.html to the most recent post featuring Strawberry shortcakes http://www.chewingthefat.us.com/2013/06/joanne-changs-balsamic-strawberry.html are extremely popular, not just with Andrew but with all our readers.  Now, in “flour, too” her recipe files have been expanded to include savories from her Flour Bakeries and Cafes in Boston.  This is huge boon to savory cooks like me.  But fear not.  Chef Chang's new cookbook includes enough sweetness to satisfy both the baker and the cook in our house. 

Wednesday, July 3, 2013

The perfect sandwich for summer: Patricia Wells' Pan Bagnat


        
“When my husband and I acquired our farmhouse in Provence…, our visits were generally limited to weekend getaways from Paris. For the train ride back to the city, a snack was essential, and pan bagnat, or "bathed bread," the Provençal sandwich found at every bakery and market in the region, became our standby. It's inexpensive, travels well, and includes many of our favorite Provençal ingredients: tomatoes, local bell peppers, black niçoise olives, anchovies and tuna, salt, and pepper—a salade niçoise, effectively, between slices of crusty bread. I'd prepare the sandwiches on Saturday, scooping out some of the crumb of the bread, then letting the pan bagnat marinate, tightly wrapped and weighted down in the refrigerator, until departure time the next day, which always made for moist and satisfying sandwiches.” You have no idea how I wish I didn’t have to add the quotation marks around these words from Patricia Wells,  in her most recent book —“Salad as a Meal” (William Morrow, 2011).  Because if there was ever anywhere on earth I’d love to live it would be in France.  And memories of a long ago visit to Provence come sweeping back at the mere mention of Pan Bagnat.

Friday, June 28, 2013

Asparagus with Lardons, a Fried Egg and Zen-sational Seasoning


         A few weeks ago, I told you about Pollen Ranch Spices (http://www.pollenranch.com), a remarkable company in the picturesquely named town of Lemon Cove, California.   My initial introduction to the company was their Fennel Pollen, a key ingredient in a recipe for Porchetta that I posted on Chewing the Fat.  Here’s the link: http://www.chewingthefat.us.com/2010/07/porchetta-slow-roasted-pork-shoulder.html.  Along with the hand collected organic fennel pollen, came a second tin of something called “Zen-sational”.  Pollen Ranch calls it ‘your secret ingredient'.  It’s a secret I’d latch on to if I were you.  It gave this simple Asparagus dish a great new taste. And exactly what is “Zen-sational”? 

Thursday, October 25, 2012

Texas Week Post 2...Kristi's Incredible Harvest Soup



Kristi
         My friend Kristi is something else.  She lives in Dallas where she runs her own business finding "real people" for clients in Advertising and Marketing. She's the best in the business so she's in perpetual motion.  She travels all over the place for her job but when she gets home, she loves to cook.  One day last week, an email arrived from Kristi, heralding the arrival of Fall.  As near as I can understand it, Fall is when the temperature in Dallas drops below 80 degrees for the first time since the previous April.   But Kristi insists that when autumn’s in the air, she makes soup.   And that’s what I did when her recipe hit my in-box.  Kristi’s own invention, Harvest soup is a warming puree of carrots and leeks and onions and sweet potatoes. But what really sets it apart is Kristi’s use of Indian inflected spices—Cardamon, turmeric and cinnamon.  There’s a little chili powder too –how could it come from Texas without it? 

Thursday, August 9, 2012

Chuck Hughes’ Tomato and Prosciutto Tart


  
         As regular readers know, we’re big fans of the Canadian Chef Chuck Hughes, whose recipes we’ve shared here before and whose Le Bremner restaurant was one of the highlights of last fall’s culinary adventures in Montreal.  His food is uncomplicated, fresh as can be and his personality is truly winning.  So when I decided to make lunch the other day and one of his recipes came to mind, I jumped on it.

Thursday, July 19, 2012

Crab Cakes with Buttermilk- Basil Dressing and Marinated Tomatoes and Corn adapted from Tyler Florence

  
         Crab Cakes are one of those dishes that are just about perfect just about anytime of year.  They’re a snap to make and you can have them cooked and kept warming in the warming drawer until you’re ready to serve your guests.   This wonderful recipe uses a lot of crab and not a lot of bread  which is key to a great crab cake.   This particular take caught our eye because it seemed like just the right thing to serve for one of our  lunches around the pool.   Its pedigree is very reassuring.  There’s not much that Tyler Florence doesn’t do perfectly and this is but one example. It’s from his late, lamented column in House Beautiful, “Tyler’s Kitchen”.  Tyler combines three summer favorites that are at their peak right now.  There’s fresh basil in the dressing.  And there are 3 varieties of tomatoes and sweet corn.   The corn is gorgeous cooked a way I’d never tried before and it was a revelation all by itself.

Monday, June 20, 2011

Roasted Asparagus with Lardons and Fried Egg Adapted from Almond Restaurant in Bridgehampton NY



        It was hard to imagine the depths of despair that a lot of people felt when, in the middle of last winter, one of our favorite restaurants abruptly closed their doors.  Not only that, but they auctioned off the contents of the place, leaving us all wondering if Almond was gone forever.