HELPING FAMILY FARMS FLOURISH. HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY.
Showing posts with label Marcella Hazan. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Marcella Hazan. Show all posts

Monday, August 4, 2014

Summer Favorites: Summer Panzanella Salad 2 Ways and Crispy Smashed Roasted Potatoes from Fine Cooking

Top to Bottom:  Panzanella Salad, Crispy Smashed Roasted Potatoes
Panzanella Salad with Tuna 

         Sometimes I am astonished at what’s not on Chewing the Fat.  Just when I start to worry that I’ll never find a recipe that I haven’t already tried, I discover amazing gaps in our collection.  Take these two recipes, which I have been making for a whole lot longer than I’ve been blogging.  The first is an Italian classic.  Just as the season’s tomatoes can’t get any sweeter and riper, I love to make this easy offering of garlick-y toasted peasant bread, red onions, olive oil, vinegar and basil.  The salad has its origins in Tuscany and is a specialty of Firenze.  It’s one of those gifts of ingenuity to la cucina from the poor for whom every scrap of bread was put to use.  Almost every Italian cookbook has a recipe for this salad and you can find plenty of recipes far more complex than the one I share here.  My old and dearly remembered friend, Marcella Hazan, made hers with capers, bell pepper, anchovy filets, and cucumbers added to the tomatoes and red onions.  Today, I bring you the most basic of all Panzanella  recipes.  And thanks to Bebe Caggiano, the Italian-American food writer and chef, the next day you can lunch on the leftovers by adding  canned tuna and fresh basil to last night’s salad.  The crunch is gone but replacing it are intensely flavored ‘croutons’ and marinated tomatoes.  It’s so simple!

Monday, October 7, 2013

Fish in Crazy Water and a tribute to the woman who introduced me to it and countless other Italian recipes, Marcella Hazan



Marcella and Victor Hazan, as loving and giving
a couple as one could ever hope to know.
If I’d never been introduced to Marcella Hazan, my cooking would have been so much poorer for it.  Marcella died last week at her home in Naples, Florida where she and her inspirational muse and husband of 58 years, Victor Hazan, had retired some years ago.  It was a loss that countless numbers of us felt deeply.  Her readers, her dear husband and her devoted son, Giuliano, were all stunned because up until the very last she was sharing her infinite wisdom with us via Facebook, of all places.  I know this only too well as I had not only ‘friended’ her but been the recipient of her advice on several occasions.  I’d written about the Italian disdain for cheese coming anywhere near seafood.  She shot right back that she’d changed her mind about that particular taboo.  She also wrote me when I had a question about a strawberry dessert.  She was endlessly generous with her time and I can’t tell you how the food writer in me was overwhelmed that I would hear from this extraordinary authority who surely had better things to do.

Tuesday, May 28, 2013

Marcella Hazan's Pasta with Abruzzi-Style Lamb Sauce




           
Marcella Hazan just celebrated her 89th Birthday.  As a salute to this great lady, a Facebook friend of mine who has taken the time to answer many Italian food questions for me, I wanted to celebrate too. Fortunately, March 2013’s Food and Wine Magazine saluted its own 35th Anniversary with “The Legends”, a collection of recipes from “the extraordinary, epoch-defining cooks” who’ve been their contributors for the past 35 years.  Julia Child, Jean-Georges Vongerichten, Jacques Pepin, Paula Wolfert and Marcella herself all came to life on their pages.  It must have been quite a task to decide what went in and what didn’t, especially since Ms. Hazan has had 27 recipes published in Food and Wine.  The Editors settled on just 3 recipes, all from “Marcella Cucina” (Alfred A. Knopf 1997).  I settled on Pasta with Abruzzi-Style Lamb Sauce.  But don’t think I won’t be back with “Fish in Crazy Water" sometime soon. 

Thursday, June 14, 2012

“Trionfo di Fragole” Strawberry and Cream Cake


  
         The local strawberries on Long Island could not be more beautiful this year—even if they’ve arrived earlier than usual due to our incredibly mild winter.  There has to be some upside to Global Warming for more than just the population of Canada!  These berries were an inspiration to Andrew who latched onto a recipe from that favorite of ours, “La Cucina Italiana”, in their latest issue.  The literal translation of Trionfo di Fragole is “A Triumph of Strawberries” and quite honestly that really hits the nail on the head. This delicate sponge cake is light as air and lemon-y thanks to a liberal dousing with Lemoncello, the Italian liqueur.  The tart strawberries are mounted atop two layers of whipped cream.  Then, just for decoration, mint leaves adorn the center of the mass of strawberries atop the cake.  So the minute you can, do not walk, run to make this incredibly wonderful cake.  It is so delicious, I wondered how it got its name.

Thursday, November 11, 2010

Beef Pot Roast with Mushrooms and a Balsamic Sauce


      Before getting to today's Pot Roast post, I wanted to give anyone who'd like, the opportunity to learn about Monte's Ham thanks
to my appearance yesterday on The Joan Hamburg show on WOR710.  Just click here for the link.  I am on at about the 45 minute mark
and you can skip ahead if you'd like.  Here it is:
http://www.wor710.com/topic/play_window.php?audioType=Episode&audioId=5002772 . Enjoy!
Now to today's post...


  Let’s be honest:  Balsamic Vinegar has taken the place of red sauce Italian in terms of being found almost too often.   It’s unfortunate too that America’s love affair with this ingredient is so completely antithetical to the way it’s used in Italy.  There, it is used sparingly—one or two drops at a time and never to replace vinegar but to supplement it.  And real Balsamic is aged for years and when finally consumed, it is a deliciously thick liquid which you only need drops of.   I was fortunate enough to be given a magnificently authentic Balsamic vinegar at the Fine Foods Show in June.  As you can see in the photo, it even looks precious and has about as much to do with its supermarket counterpoint as red wine does to vinegar. We drizzled that balsamic on hard cheese and it was out of this world.