HELPING FAMILY FARMS FLOURISH. HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY.
Showing posts with label Mushrooms. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Mushrooms. Show all posts

Monday, September 16, 2013

Wild Mushroom and Sausage Hash with Poached Eggs

         
The 3 lb Gourmet Collection
is irresistible to Mushroom Lovers
All summer long, I’ve been working with Jane Maguire and John Quigley on their burgeoning Long Island Mushroom Inc. business.  The two have supplied restaurants that are at the very top of the Hamptons food chain.  And they’ve been at local farmers’ markets in Greenport and Shelter Island.  They’d be in more of these were it not for some of the restrictive policies that make farmers’ markets not nearly as competitive as they should be.  But never mind.  With products like their 3 lb. Gourmet Basket showcasing three varieties—Maitakes, Blue Oysters and Shiitakes—they’re going places.  If you’re a restauranteur, you’re in luck.  Given 24 hours notice, Long Island Mushroom Inc. promises delivery to any locale on the East End.  Just call 631 876 5401.  If you’re a consumer, they’ll be at the Farmers’ Market in Greenport and you can also find their offerings at Sang Lee Farm in Cutchogue, Garden of Eve in Riverhead, Country View Farm in Southold, and Schmitts Farm in Laurel.   I love their mushrooms and am constantly on the outlook for ways to serve them.  Today, I am going to share with you an ideal mushroom dish for Fall.   It’s a personal sacrifice too. Because once a recipe gets published here, that’s usually it for our house.  But in this case, I can’t imagine not making this again and again.

Sunday, July 21, 2013

Mushroom and Pepper Jack Tart with Long Island Mushrooms

         
Long Island Mushroom company is the brainchild of two Rhode Island natives who grew up in the same town, became High School Sweethearts, parted ways and re-kindled their romance thirty-two years later.  Jane Maguire and John Quigley are their names and Long Island Mushroom is their second act-–both personally and professionally.  The couple have taken to mushroom farming in a big way.  Their 6500 square foot growing space on the North Fork is packed with glorious
Left to Right: Shiitakes, Blue Oyster and
Miitake Mushrooms from
Long Island Mushroom
Shiitakes, Miitakes and Blue Oyster mushrooms, the perfect combination for creating “wild” mushroom dishes without foraging for them on your own.  You don’t even have to clean them.  That’s because they are grown without soil on pressed paper and sawdust logs that they couple brings in from ‘the mushroom capital of the US’, Kennett Square Pennsylvania.  They’re grown under strict temperature controls and in very high humidity.  Each log produces ‘blooms’ of mushrooms that are harvested simply by being snapped off.  Each log produces 3 crops of mushrooms in a 48 day period before being replaced.  With Jane manning sales and John keeping the farm growing, Long Island Mushroom has found its way into the top restaurant kitchens on the East End, including “The Topping Rose House” in Bridgehampton, Tom Collichio’s wildly successful foray into the Hamptons. 

Monday, May 13, 2013

Creamed Mushroom Bruschetta with Caramelized Onions From Chef Chris Pandel of Chicago's Balena via Sam Sifton in the New York Times Magazine


  
        
Balena
1633 N Halsted St  Chicago, IL 60614
(312) 867-3888
As Sam Sifton recalls, when the waitress at Chicago’s Balena restaurant approached the table with a steak knife, everyone’s eyebrows went up. No one had ordered steak.  The waitress explained the knife was for the mushrooms.  Someone had ordered a ravishing dish: Creamy-rich Creminis browned to perfection and very simply cooked with some shallots and fresh thyme before being turned into complete ambrosia with a beaker of heavy cream.  Not content to stop there, Chef Chris Pandel used them atop thick slices of toasted Sour Dough Rye Bread crowned with the sweetest of caramelized onions. They literally jumped off the page at me. I could not wait to try them. And neither apparently could Sam Sifton.

Friday, December 23, 2011

Joe Beef’s Big Beautiful Roasted Mushrooms



         I’ve already waxed poetic over Joe Beef, that phenomenal Montreal restaurant where we craved everything we ate.  Almost everything we tried was truly over the top.  And Andrew and I were not the least bit surprised to see that “The World According to Joe Beef: A Cookbook of sorts” tops most Top Ten Cookbooks of 2011 lists.   The book is just a delight and just as delightful as Frederic Morin whom we were so pleased to meet when we ate there.  I literally bought the book the first day it came out in the US.  And of course, I couldn’t wait to try the recipes that he and his partner, David McMillan have put together for their readers.  But it may come as a surprise that the first recipe I tried was one for simple large white mushrooms. And I thought, “if we’re doing 12 days of Christmas recipes, why not include this one?”  It’s a perfect accompaniment to any holiday roast—beef, chicken, pork or lamb.

Thursday, July 8, 2010

Strip Steaks with Brandied Porcini Mushroom Sauce


I love to pan sauté steaks.  They get a really good caramelized topping and they’re very easy to cook.  I realize it may be the height of barbecue season, but it’s really oppressively hot outside.  So I bring this recipe to your attention because you can cook it quickly and easily and stay in the Air Conditioning while you do.   And you actually couldn’t really get this recipe right on the grill because you need the pan drippings for the sauce.  So keep cool and eat like a king.

Monday, March 1, 2010

Butternut Squash and Duxelles, a vegetarian main course or a great new side dish to try.




I remember when my Mother got her first Cuisinart in the 70s.  They were about the same price they are now but in '70s dollars, they weren’t cheap.  But my Mother was notorious for buying any labor-saving device that would get her out of the kitchen as quickly as possible.  So it wasn’t a surprise that she  latched onto the Cuisinart in the first wave of buyers.  I remembered asking her what she could make with it.  “Peanut Butter” she replied, “and Duxelles”.  Why you would spend over $200.00 for something you could get in a jar for .79 cents was a little beyond me.  And I can positively guarantee that no dish involving Duxelles, that paste of finely chopped mushrooms and shallots so dear to classic French cuisine, ever came out of my mother’s kitchen.  But in trying to find some vegetarian dishes to share with you, I came across a wonderful casserole of Butternut Squash, and yes, Duxelles.