HELPING FAMILY FARMS FLOURISH. HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY.
Showing posts with label One dish dinners. Show all posts
Showing posts with label One dish dinners. Show all posts

Monday, May 19, 2014

Chicken Paella with Sugar Snap Peas in about an hour!



        There's no one dish supper quite on the level of a great paella.  It combines protein--sometimes several of them--with carbohydrates and then, for good measure, adds some vegetables. The one big drawback to paella is the interminable time a good one takes to make.  So this recipe from Bon Appetit caught my eye when the magazine put it in a feature called ‘Fresh and Easy Dinners’. It actually toppped their list, and was pictured on their cover.  If you’re ever had a paella in Spain, you know it is hardly ‘quick’ and involves a special paella pan. But this one uses any heavy skillet you have on hand and gets dinner on the table in about an hour.  Considering my memories of paella, that's simply astonishing.

Sunday, March 30, 2014

Chicken with Shallots from Sam Sifton in the New York Times Sunday Magazine via Rishia Zimmern adapted from Martha Stewart


Sam Sifton 
As fond as I am of the current food crew at The New York Times, I still miss Sam Sifton.  He was the Deputy Dining Editor in 2001 when he was almost instantly tapped to become the Dining Editor a position he held till 2004.  He was with the Times a Culture Editor from then until 2009.  That year he took over from Frank Bruni and became the Restaurant Critic for the Times.  The burnout rate for that job is high: Sifton ate out almost nightly until his last restaurant review appeared almost two years to the day that he started.  But for all of us who miss him, Sifton has graced the Food page of the New York Times Sunday magazine periodically ever since.  And one of those times was a recent Sunday when the recipe I am sharing today appeared.  It was wildly popular--so popular in fact that one of its key ingredients completely disappeared from some grocery stores.

Sunday, March 2, 2014

Meat Mushroom and Potato Skillet Gratin Adapted from Melissa Clark in The New York Times



         At the risk of people believing I must be going steady with Melissa Clark, I am rushing this out in advance of the latest winter storm.  Even though I just shared Melissa’s superb Pork Chop recipe the middle of last month, I could not resist posting this latest triumph from last Wednesday’s “A Good Appetite” column.  This is stuck-in-the house, freezing-cold-outside food at its finest.  It’s Melissa’s inspired combination of elements you find in a crisp potato gratin and in a cottage or shepherd’s pie.  It’s cheesy, rich and come to think of it, gluten-free!  It’s not the fastest dish in the world to cook which makes me think that if you’re going to be housebound for any length of time, it will be the perfect thing to prepare.  It also has the great advantage of being a one-pot dinner.  Well, that is unless like me and Melissa you feel it would look a whole lot better on a plate with a nice big green salad tossed in a lemon vinaigrette.  So what changes did I make to Melissa’s original recipe?  Don’t think I didn’t try to make the original....      

Monday, January 27, 2014

Cosmo Goss' Beer-Braised Pork Belly and Arugula Salad


        
Chef Cosmo
Goss "Hop Chef"
Gail Collins, the columnist who calls the New York Times Opinion pages home, loves a good name.  One of her all-time favorites is Butch Otter, the Governor of the great state of Idaho about whom Collins wrote: “ That is not really the point (of her editorial) but I always enjoy writing “Gov. Butch Otter”. For me, there's a chef's name that I enjoy writing too: "Cosmo Goss". But unlike Ms. Collins, I have a really good reason to write it.  He created a dinner salad that I've made twice in a week. And not because I ruined it the first time.  I just wanted more. Cosmo Goss is a chef at Publican restaurants in Chicago. Cosmo was recently named Brewery Ommegang’s “Hop Chef”, as winner of a cooking contest centered on--you guessed it--beer. This wonderful salad is also a salute to Pork Belly.  As if it needed one: Pork Belly is everywhere.  And proof of its popularity is its ever-escalating price.  Mine came in at 4.99 lb. When ground pork is 3.69, you have to wonder why 4.99 for something that looks very much like extremely fatty bacon.  However, one taste of this salad, with its sweet and slightly spicy dressing, golden slices of sauteed pear, tangy arugula and pork belly braised in an artisan ale will convince you that 4.99 is a very little price to pay.  Once you’re over that hump, onto the next one, which is the cost of the requisite ale. 

Friday, December 27, 2013

Ina Garten's Lobster Pot Pie and, just for laughs, one woman's take on it.

        

         This is one of Ina Garten’s most beloved recipes.  It dates all the way back to 1999 when it appeared in Ina’s first cookbook “The Barefoot Contessa Cookbook” (Clarkson Potter 1999).  Since I can’t think of  a better time for luxury foods like lobster than the holidays, I planned a dinner around it.  But whether lobster still counts as a luxury, I am not altogether sure.  The Maine Lobstermen certainly don’t think so as it brings in only $1.60 or less a pound!  (Somehow, by the time it arrives at our fishmonger in New York, it’s $9.99 a lb.  Still a bargain for sure, with divers scallops at 24.99 a lb and Lump Crabmeat at 19.99 a lb.). I decided to turn a Saturday night supper into Lobster Pot Pie and a salad.  But first, I wanted to share what I hope will give you a good laugh. 

Thursday, December 13, 2012

Chicken, Sausages and Sage: One dish cooking at its best.

In the roasting pan, a one dish wonder!


         The bones for this recipe came from a famous English cook and television personality who shall remain nameless.  It’s not that I don’t devour the prose in the cookbooks the chef’s written.  It’s beautiful and seductive.  But when it comes to the recipes I’ve tried, I am sure the chef in question would request anonymity.  In my experience, they’ve led to some seriously flawed dishes.  A curry that was swimming in more liquid than Lake Ontario comes immediately to mind.  A cake that collapsed, on not just the first attempt at baking it, but the next as well.  I am not sure what the cause is.  Translating metric ingredients into cups and ounces?  Un-tested recipes?  So you may ask why then would I tempt fate again?  I was seduced by a photograph showing deeply golden chicken and perfectly browned sausages.   The dish not only looked fantastic, it had been vetted at the kitchens of Food and Wine Magazine under the supervision of the great Grace Parisi, for whom I have undying respect.  So I tossed aside worries about its principle author and made it for a Sunday supper, adding a few ideas of my own.

Monday, November 26, 2012

Skillet Lemon Chicken with Spinach and Fingerling Potatoes and Spinach from Nathalie Dupree's "Mastering the Art of Southern Cooking"




         Nathalie Dupree has just published “Mastering the Art of Southern Cooking” (Gibbs Smith 2012), an immense compendium of Southern cuisine, which runs 720 pages and contains some 650 recipes. Amazingly, Nathalie writes in her introduction that 300 pages and 100 photographs never saw the light of day.  It is a beautifully written book, a collaboration with her former TV show producer, Cynthia Graubart. Its title is an homage to Julia Child who encouraged Ms. Dupree to write and teach the moment the two met at the Cordon Bleu in London in 1971.  Several years later, Nathalie took Julia’s advice to heart and first opened her own cooking school 40 miles outside of Atlanta or “midway between Social Circle and Covington, Georgia across from the Tri-County Cattle Auction Barn and Hub Junction”, Nathalie writes.  Soon she was lured to Rich’s, Atlanta’s famous and now defunct department store, to teach in their downtown store.

Thursday, October 11, 2012

Indian Pot Roast from Whole Foods Market


  
         If you are thinking “native American”, this recipe probably wouldn’t raise an eyebrow.  But we’ve long since stopped calling Native Americans “Indians”.  No, the name of this dish refers to the Asian sub-continent of India.  And that may be even more surprising.  The cow is considered sacred by most Hindus.  That makes beef taboo in all but two Indian states: Goa on the west coast and Kerala at the southern tip of India.  There you will find it sold in restaurants.  But in the rest of India, you’ll have to seek out international restaurants catering to Western customers who simply can’t live without their beef. 
Sacred Cow in front of McDonald's...
never inside!
Behold the Maharaja Mac
Where, I wondered, does that leave McDonald’s? There are over 250 McDonald’s in 12 Indian cities and not one Big Mac to be found in any of them.  Instead the offerings are limited to the McVeggie—bread, peas, carrots, potatoes, Indian spices, lettuce and Mayo on a sesame seed bun. The McChicken is self explanatory. The Filet o Fish sounds exactly like the one at home.  And what is the Big Mac equivalent?  Two browned chicken breasts, onions, lettuce, tomatoes and cheese on “ Sesame bedecked bread buns”.  Top of the line, it’s called the Chicken Maharaja-Mac. And it costs just 60 rupees. That’s 1.30 cents. So what’s with Whole Foods “Indian Pot Roast”?

Thursday, October 4, 2012

Tyler Florence's California Osso Buco with a Classic Gremolata



         When I started cooking Osso Buco, it was a sumptuous meal on a beer budget.  The Veal Shanks at the center of the dish were afterthoughts at the butcher’s counter.  It’s hard to imagine but I think they ran about $4.99 a lb. at most.  Andrew is fond of pointing out that I have no concept of how many years ago that was and that in 25 years almost everything is more expensive. But, like fresh tuna, which at one point was practically given away, the huge popularity of this Italian masterpiece has upped its price mightily.   Osso Buco means ‘bone with a hole in it’ and it’s gotten to be a very expensive bone.  But it’s a triumph of taste—the meat is tender to the bone, the sauce is filled with fresh vegetables stewed to perfection in red wine and tomatoes—even the marrow in the center of the bone is a guilty pleasure.   The recipe hails from Lombardy, the region that’s home to Milano, where it is classically served atop risotto.  Since risotto needs constant attention until the minute it is served, I use mashed potatoes instead.  Because I find Osso Buco is one of the greatest ideas for weeknight dinner parties.  We were entertaining my nephew, Michael and his wife, Valery who were here from Canada.   Leaving out the risotto meant I could spend all the time I wanted with them and then take all of about 5 minutes to mash the potatoes.   Like so many other braised dishes, this one too improves considerably when left a day or three in the fridge.  So it’s perfect to make over on a Sunday afternoon to serve later in the week.  I’ve published a recipe for Osso Buco before. So why is this one here?

Monday, July 16, 2012

Watermelon Salsa served 2 ways: In Fish Tacos and a Blackened Swordfish Salad



         For the last few summers, one of our salads of choice has been the Watermelon and Tomato rendition first published here in July 2010: http://www.chewingthefat.us.com/2010/07/watermelon-and-tomato-salad.html.  Nothing says 'cool off' like watermelon and this salad combines the sweetness of the fruit with the tang of ripe tomatoes, a jolt of red onion and a splash of red wine vinegar.  It’s a perfect accompaniment to almost anything grilled, truly a dish that has summer written all over it.  So when I spotted a recipe for Fish Tacos with Watermelon Salsa, I couldn’t wait to try it.

Thursday, May 31, 2012

Stir-Fry of Asparagus, Sugar Snap Peas and Pork Tenderloin


  
Sugar Snaps have joined the Asparagus
at The Farmer's Market 
         You may wonder how much more asparagus I can possibly eat this asparagus season.  The answer is I’ll eat as much as I can.  I love the fresh flavor and texture that asparagus brings to the dinner plate. And the season is all too short for asparagus fans like me.  Now another Spring favorite has arrived.  Sugar Snap Peas are in! This Asian inspired dish uses them both in a crunchy dish that cooks in all of 15 minutes.  You could make this dish with boneless breasts of chicken or, for a meatless meal, use tofu.  I chose pork tenderloin for a weeknight dinner recently.  Because this recipe is for 4, we ended up with enough for Andrew to enjoy a second helping a couple of nights later.  One note: While there are red pepper flakes in the recipe, when Andrew re-heated the dish, he gave it a shot of Sriracha Chile Sauce and loved the spicy result.  If you’ve got children, proceed with caution if you decide you want more heat.

Thursday, May 10, 2012

Braised Chicken with Garlic Scape Puree




Garlic Scapes
         My friend June, an avid reader of Chewing the Fat, sent me a message recently because she simply could not find an ingredient in one of our recipes. She went to four different stores looking for something I could have bought at four different places in my neighborhood.  In hers, however, Cremini Mushrooms were a no go.  Her request was that I inform my readers of a substitute—which in the case of the missing mushrooms was “white button mushrooms”.  So today, while I introduce you to an incredibly delicious combination of tender chicken, light as air potatoes flavored with garlic and topped with fresh green garlic scapes, I’ll tell you straight from the start: If you can’t find garlic scapes, use a bunch of Scallions instead.  But, if you can find the scapes, by all means use them.  They’re another reason to welcome Spring and the return of fresh produce to the Farmer’s Market.
60,000 shoppers visit the Farmer's Market
at Union Square every Saturday in season.
            Garlic itself is no stranger to most kitchens.  The bulb can be used in dozens of dishes.  But in earliest Spring, the stalk of the plant , the scape, contains a wonderfully mild garlic flavor, never as pungent as the full grown bulb. The garlic scape serves as the stem from which the seed head of the garlic bulb is formed. As the bulb begins to grow and mature, garlic scapes begin to lengthen and curve. Early in the growing cycle, the garlic scape is relatively tender, making it ideal for use as an ingredient to cook with.  As the plant continues to grow, the scape gradually begins to straighten, creating more support for the bulb. And it becomes far too tough to be usable.  And last week at the Union Square Farmer’s Market in New York, the short-lived scape was at its peak.  I couldn’t’ wait to take them home.  But I had no idea what to do with them.

Thursday, March 1, 2012

Birthday Party Paella



         We were having a group to dinner over the President’s Day weekend.  I saw it as a great opportunity to cook something substantial.  I hit upon making a paella for a couple of reasons. I’d read an article in Saveur written by David Rosengarten.  In it, Chef Rosengarten had gone to the source: the cradle of Spanish paella making, Valencia.  What inspired me the most was that the original recipe, dating from the early 1800s, called saffron-scented rice cooked with Rabbit, chicken, Snails and three kinds of beans. Rosengarten pointed out that you can still find that version all over Valencia. But the list of paellas does not stop there.  There are seafood paellas, vegetable paellas and paellas using all kinds of meats. The recipe is wildly adaptable because as Rosengarten pointed out: “Tinkering, it seems, is inherent to the culture of paella.”  And it’s to be remembered that “Paella” refers the wide, shallow steel pan in which such dishes were cooked.  In my case, all I really needed was a good basic recipe from which to build my paella.  And as to its ingredients, well I just went shopping in my freezer.  There I found the chicken thighs, hot Italian sausage and shrimp that would form the backbone of what turned out to be a delicious and terrifically well-received dish.  Although no thanks to the recipe I found for Birthday Party Paella. 

Monday, August 22, 2011

Daniel Boulud’s Stovetop Lobster and Clambake



         I have to admit, I don’t publish a recipe that doesn’t turn out right.  My whole premise is that if I can cook it perfectly, you can cook it perfectly.  So with all the 200 plus recipes on Chewing the Fat, if you can follow the directions, you can end up with something tasty.  That being said, sometimes I completely hit one out of the ballpark.  And today’s dish is a home run from the first morsel you put in your mouth to the last bit of broth that you’ll zealously sop up with the last crust of baguette.  It is that good. 

Thursday, June 23, 2011

Coconut Shrimp Salad



Too often for my liking, I get into trouble with a recipe that’s just too much food for two people.  Try as I may, cutting back on volume isn’t always the easiest task.   Things that say they are for four people are relatively simple to divide in half.  It’s when you get to recipe for 6 or 8 servings that I start having problems.  Math was never my strong suit to begin with.  So you can imagine my intimidation when I saw this recipe from Specialty Food Magazine.  It was for 24 (8 ounce) portions.  But two things stirred me into action. The first was that I cannot get enough coconut--or shrimp for that matter.  The second is that summer is always in need of a great new salad recipe.  And this one is.
Specialty Food Magazine is hardly a regular resource for recipes for me.  Especially since its recipes are really for people who are running restaurants and, in this case apparently, take-out counters.  The 24 portions were said to have a shelf-life of 3 days.  But not wanting to set up shop or start a Coconut Shrimp stand on the street, I cut the recipe back mightily. We still had some leftovers but of a totally manageable size.  This recipe is now a respectable serving for 4 people.  And hopefully, you won’t have to worry about it shelf life since my guess is it will disappear at one sitting.
Coconut, in all its forms—as coconut water, milk, palm sugar and flakes—is very easy to find.  I got every one of them at Whole Foods.  Coconut water is now prized for its health food benefits. It’s low in carbs, 99% fat free and low in sugars.  Coconut milk on the other hand is quite caloric and I’d go with the light versions. Coconut Palm Sugar is hardly a health food but it does have a very low carb profile and it has an absolutely phenomenal taste—far deeper and more complex than brown sugar which it resembles visually.   Finally there are the coconut flakes.  Toasted, these golden brown shreds give your salad a wonderful texture.  
If you love coconut, what’s great about this dish is that the whole thing is perfumed with it and cooked with coconut at every stage.  The cooking water for the rice is the starting point.  Then there’s the coconut palm sugar in the dressing for a slight sweetness and the coconut milk which makes it creamy.  The coconut flakes in the salad give it crunch.  Finally the whole thing takes 45 minutes prep time and you can make it ahead of time thanks to that advertised 3 day shelf life.  Here’s the recipe:
Recipe for Coconut Shrimp Salad adapted from Joanna Pruess’ recipe in Specialty Food Magazine:
 1 1/2 cups coconut water

1 cups jasmine rice

¼ cup vegetable or coconut oil

16 peeled and deveined jumbo shrimp

1/2 cups peanut butter

1/4 cups coconut milk

1 freshly squeezed lime

2 tbsp. Thai fish sauce

2 tbsp coconut palm sugar

1 ounce fresh ginger, chopped

1 Jalapeno pepper, chopped, plus 1 tbsp. red chile flakes

2 cloves garlic

4 thinly sliced scallions, including most of the green parts

1 1/2 ounces chopped pistachios, plus extra to garnish
1 ounces coconut flakes, toasted, plus ½ ounce for garnish

1 cup fresh basil leaves, finely julienned, plus extra for garnish


1. Combine coconut water, rice and ¼ cup of oil in a saucepan; bring to a boil over high heat, then cover, reduce heat and simmer for 20 minutes. Remove from heat and let stand for 10 minutes. Turn into a large strainer, rinse with cold water and drain well. Transfer to a large bowl.

2. Meanwhile, cook shrimp in skillet until just done, about 2 minutes. Set aside to cool. If jumbo shrimp, cut in three pieces and add to the rice.











3. In the jar of an electric blender, combine peanut butter, coconut milk,  lime juice, Thai fish sauce, palm sugar, ginger, 1/2 chopped jalapeno, red pepper flakes and garlic; purée until smooth. With the motor running, add 1/4 cup of vegetable oil and let it emulsify.

4. Add scallions, pistachios, coconut flakes, basil leaves and the remaining jalapeno to the rice. Pour about two-thirds of the dressing over the salad and toss to blend. Add remaining dressing and additional lime juice, if desired. Transfer to a serving platter and add remaining pistachios, coconut flakes and basil leaves as garnishes. 







Thursday, May 26, 2011

Shrimp and Sausage Jambalaya



In the pantheon of one dish wonders, it’s hard to beat a great Jambalaya, another of Louisiana’s culinary gifts to the rest of the world.  It is said that the first Jambalaya came out of the French Quarter.  It was an attempt to cook Paella, with whom it shares many ingredients.  But absent the saffron Paella requires, tomatoes were used as a stand-in.  There are two kinds of Jambalaya—Creole and Cajun.  This recipe has lots of tomato in it and so qualifies as Creole.  Cajuns refer to this version as red Jambalaya.   Aside from the tomatoes, the major difference is that Cajun or brown Jambalaya is more smoky and spicy. 
The all essential 'holy trinity'
There’s almost nothing that you can’t put into Jambalaya.  Chicken and sausage are followed by vegetables and rice and finally with seafood in the Creole Version. The Cajuns, living as they did in swamp country where crawfish, shrimp, alligator, duck, turtle, boar, venison and other game were readily available used these meats in many combinations.  But they eschewed tomatoes altogether.  Both versions start with ‘the holy trinity’ of Louisiana cooking: Onions, Bell Peppers and Celery.  Although no one is quite sure where the name Jambalaya came from it’s been popular in good times and in bad because of its ‘throw everything into the pot’ composition.
This version, which first appeared in Coastal Living magazine, is very easy to make and takes less time than you’d think—about 20 minutes to prep and 40 minutes to cook.  It is greatly helped along by the use of cooked long grain rice.  (Original recipes cooked everything but the rice and the seafood for about an hour when the rice was added for the another 30 minutes and the seafood for the last five.)  I confess to cheating on the rice.  I couldn’t see cooking rice separately so I went to a local Chinese restaurant where I bought a pint container of steamed rice.  For $1.36, it seemed like a small price to pay for some labor saved.  Even though this is a Creole version, I went a little Cajun.  I upped the spice quotient with some McIlhenny Tabasco sauce.  The McIlhennys has been making the sauce on Avery Island, Louisiana  since 1868 where it still owned and operated by the same family.  You can’t get much more authentic than that.  Here’s the recipe:
Recipe for Shrimp and Sausage Jambalaya adapted from Coastal Living Magazine. 
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
12 ounces Andouille or other spicy smoked sausage, sliced (I used Andouille Chicken sausage to cut calories without cutting flavor)
1 large onion, diced
1 bell pepper, diced
3 celery ribs, chopped
4 garlic cloves, minced
2 bay leaves
1 teaspoon dried thyme
1 teaspoon dried oregano
2 teaspoons Creole seasoning
1 (14-ounce) can diced tomatoes, with juice
3 cups chicken broth
2 cups cooked long-grain rice
6-8  shrimp, peeled and deveined
4 green onions, chopped
McIlhnney's Tabasco Sauce to taste

1. Heat oil in a Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add sausage, and cook, stirring constantly, 5 minutes or until lightly browned. Remove sausage with a slotted spoon; set aside.   
  2. Add onion and next 7 ingredients to hot drippings in Dutch oven; sauté 5         minutes or until vegetables are tender. Stir in reserved sausage, tomatoes, broth, and rice. Bring mixture to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer, covered, 25 minutes or until rice is tender.




. 3. Stir in shrimp; cover and cook 5 minutes or until done. Check for seasoning and add McIlhenny's Tabasco Sauce, salt and pepper to taste.  Put into bowls and sprinkle each serving with green onions.

Friday, February 18, 2011

The Chef’s Diet Secret: Turkey Chili


      Quite honestly, to me ground turkey is one of life’s bigger turnoffs. In order to achieve its undoubtedly low calorie profile, every possible bit of fat has been given the heave ho leaving the cook desperate for ways to make it palatable.  Have you noticed how often Turkey Burgers are covered with cheese and all manners of ‘special sauces’ to make up for their lack of taste?  Of course, this completely defeats the purpose of eating the stuff in the first place.  But there are ways to add flavor and still keep the calorie count under control.  One of them is Turkey Chili.

Tuesday, July 13, 2010

Chicken and Sausage Maque Choux



It never occurred to me to serve a stew in the summer.  But here’s how it happened.  I am getting ready to go out to the beach for some good long stretches this summer.  As the departure date approaches, I’ve been trying to pare down what’s sitting in the freezer. I have a confession to make.  Provided the food is well-sealed, you can keep stuff in the freezer far longer than anyone thinks you can.  But raw ingredients don’t fare as well as what’s been cooked.  And what I specifically had to cook were some Chicken thighs and sausage.  I did some research and came up with this recipe from Gourmet that’s about 10 years old.  Not only did it use my chicken and sausage, it was full of summer vegetables, a gorgeous colorful dish that was stew-like and very satisfying. 

Monday, June 7, 2010

Country Captain Chicken



        It’s not often that I share with you a recipe with such an interesting background as Country Captain, a dish steeped in the lore of the Low Country of South Carolina and Georgia.   It’s found in every Southeastern Junior League cookbook but its origins go back considerably further than the League.  Its earliest known version is found in a cookbook published in Philadelphia in 1857.  But it owes a sizeable debt to two American cooking pioneers and an American Southern Cooking legend herself, Edna Lewis.


Tuesday, June 1, 2010

Red Snapper Filets with Merguez Sausage, Little Neck Clams and Romesco Sauce



You can’t sit down to write a recipe without wondering what constitutes out-and-out thievery.  There is no possible way that you yourself could invent something so absolutely new and startling that you could proudly call it yours and yours alone.   Everything has to have come from some knowledge that you picked up from someone or somewhere else.  But giving credit where it is due isn’t the way of some major talents in the food galaxy.  I can’t run this down but it sounds apocryphal enough to be true:  One of the greatest doyennes of cooking is said to have recognized so many of the recipes of a then younger upstart that she remarked ‘’she is a superb copier”.  But at what point are we not all copiers, superb or not? 
        One theory holds that if three ingredients are different, whatever recipe it is, is therefore original.  Another is that as long as you attribute your recipe to its original developer, you’re covered.   I suppose if you went back to the very beginnings, you’d have to give credit to the man who invented fire or discovered that you could boil water.  But if you go to the rules governing Recipe contests, here’s what you’ll find:  Changing one or two ingredients in someone else’s recipe does not make it original.  And if you have the temerity to change the ingredients and still lift the instructions for the recipe from whatever it is you made the substitutions to, that isn’t originality,  it’s plagiarism.  And while recipes cannot be copyrighted, cookbooks most certainly can.  Which brings us to the great Alfred Portale, who must be given a lot of credit for the Snapper recipe here.