HELPING FAMILY FARMS FLOURISH. HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY.
Showing posts with label Party Food. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Party Food. Show all posts

Thursday, April 17, 2014

A gorgeous addition to any Easter Table....Andrew’s Coconut Cupcakes – Ina Garten’s recipe


Coconut Cupcakes that Andrew eggified for Easter!

Easter is late this year which is just as well.  In the run-up to Easter Sunday, we’ve had snow, ice, and cold temperatures this week that feel more like March.  That’s why these cupcakes jumped off the page—they clearly look like an Easter filled with color and jelly beans.  And it’s about time. And for those who observe Lent, it’s time for a little indulgence.  Like these coco-nutty cupcakes.   with their  It’s gotten more hits than Lady Gaga. Clearly people love their sweets.  So today, we’re sharing Ina Garten’s recipe for Coconut Cupcakes.  Andrew made Ina Garten’s recipe again for an Easter party last year and they were a huge hit.  And if you love coconut, this cupcake is for you.  There’s coconut in the cake and coconut on top.  And I think you’ll agree, he’s really got them whacked—they look just like their picture.   So without further ado, here’s the recipe:

Recipe for Coconut Cupcakes:

3/4 pound (3 sticks) unsalted butter, room temperature
2 cups sugar
5 extra-large eggs at room temperature
1 1/2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
1 1/2 teaspoons pure almond extract
3 cups flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1 cup buttermilk
14 ounces sweetened, shredded coconut

For the frosting:
1 pound cream cheese at room temperature
3/4 pound (3 sticks) unsalted butter, room temperature
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/2 teaspoon pure almond extract
1 1/2 pounds confectioners' sugar, sifted

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees F.
In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, cream the butter and sugar on high speed until light and fluffy, about 5 minutes. With the mixer on low speed, add the eggs, 1 at a time, scraping down the bowl after each addition. Add the vanilla and almond extracts and mix well.
In a separate bowl, sift together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. In 3 parts, alternately add the dry ingredients and the buttermilk to the batter, beginning and ending with the dry. Mix until just combined. Fold in 7 ounces of coconut.
Line a muffin pan with paper liners. Fill each liner to the top with batter. Bake for 25 to 35 minutes, until the tops are brown and a toothpick comes out clean. Allow to cool in the pan for 15 minutes. Remove to a baking rack and cool. 
Meanwhile, make the frosting. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, on low speed, cream together the cream cheese, butter, and vanilla and almond extracts. Add the confectioners' sugar and mix until smooth.



Frost the cupcakes and dip the frosted cake into the remaining coconut.

Makes 18 to 20 cupcakes.

Thursday, October 24, 2013

Just in time for Halloween…Tim Burton Cupcakes



        Our god daughter, Olivia is very special to us.  We were there the night she was born and she’s been a wonderful part of our life ever since. She’s lovely to be with, so much fun and so full of personality.  When I see her with Uncle Andrew, I realize what a phenomenal father he would have been—patient, generous and interested in everything Olivia is doing.
When her birthday comes around, Uncle Andrew goes all out in the baking department every year. A couple of years ago, at Olivia’s request, he channeled her favorite movie director and invented Tim Burton-themed cupcakes.  There were two odes to Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, and a delicious take on “James and the Giant Peach”.  As you can see from this shot, these cupcakes were the hit of Olivia’s 11th Birthday Party.  And we think they may be just the thing to bring Halloween to the next level.  Here are the recipes which are not only odes to Tim Burton, they’re phenomenally delicious treats that will appeal to everyone at your Halloween Party.

Friday, November 16, 2012

Thanksgiving 101: Gratin of Sweet Potatoes and Leeks



        My friend Betty once told me a riotous story of being invited to a Thanksgiving dinner and being asked to "bring something".  When she arrived on the big day, there were 12, count 'em, sweet potato casseroles.  Lesson learned: If you're going 'potluck' on Turkey Day, assign the side dishes.  And you couldn't do much better than this deliciously rich gratin. It's a true example of  over-the-top Thanksgiving cooking. Fair warning…this is one of the richest things (aka fatty) I’ve made in a very long time.  But it was so delicious and really satisfying in tiny portions that I’d make again in a heartbeat…assuming I still had a pulse after consuming the pancetta and cream involved in the dish.
The other great thing about this dish is that it benefits from being made ahead. You can put the whole thing together a couple of days in advance and take it right up to the baking stage on the big day.  It also is very forgiving and can be cooked longer than the time given which is always a huge help when you're putting together your Thanksgiving dinner.  Another advantage to it's timing is that it's a lot easier to serve in beautiful little squares if it rests before serving.
All in all, it's a winner in every way.

Sunday, December 18, 2011

Rustic French Pate




         I discovered this wonderfully different pate almost by accident as you will read in this story.  But in casting about for our 12 days of Christmas recipes, I realized it's just the kind of dish that has Holiday written all over it.  A pate that you can put on a buffet table at a holiday party and watch disappear.  And wonder of wonders, it's not a pate riddled fat. In fact the only fat in it is from the ground pork and veal. Nothing else.  So go ahead and make this delicious dish one day this season.  I think you'll wish me a Merry Christmas when you do. Now here's the background.

Friday, December 16, 2011

A really easy way to brighten up the Holiday Cocktail Hour


         
       Tonight, our friends David, Carrington and Mitch will hold a Holiday Cocktail Party. As much as I am looking forward to seeing each of them, what I am really hoping we'll find is that David has once again made this wonderful hors d'oeuvre.  David has a terrific New Year’s Day Party. And a year ago while ushering in the New Year, David introduced us to a gorgeous dish I’d never seen before. It’s a combination of a very simple egg salad topped with some beautiful Salmon Roe as you can see for yourself….

Thursday, December 15, 2011

Ina Garten's Roasted Shrimp Cocktail with Spicy Cocktail Sauce

Flowers from the fabulous
Bridgehampton Florist..where else?

These shrimp are the center of attention on our Holiday Open House Buffett.

Ina Garten is a goddess around here. She lives in the next town over and has for years and years. Before becoming the TV star and author, she had a local food shop and catering service which endeared her to hundreds of customers. Now, with seven indispensable cookbooks in print, she’s endeared herself to millions. Much to her chagrin, because she likes to be able to walk around town and in and out of shops without causing a riot, there’s a cottage industry that’s sprung up involving Fans who come to the East End on self-guided “Ina tours” many of which wind up in our dear friends Michael and Jimmy’s shop, the Bridgehampton Florist. As frequent guests on Ina’s TV show, Michael and Jim are celebrities to these visitors. Personally, I get it. Ina is a sensational teacher and advocate of simple, wonderful food. And from her cookbook “Barefoot Contessa Back to Basics” comes her recipe for Roasted Shrimp Cocktail. To me, that alone should put her on a pedestal.

Friday, December 31, 2010

Episcopalian Chopped Liver



        For my final Chewing the Fat post of the year, I wanted to share a recipe I developed about 25 years ago.  It appeared in Saveur magazine and if you google it, you’ll find it on several of recipe sites.  To me, what’s odd is that there’s no explanation on any of these sites that gives any indication of why it is called what it is.  The Saveur article gave the whole tale but neither the recipe nor the story (nor its author, by the way), made it onto www.saveur.com  So here is the tale and the recipe.  I just made it for our Holiday Open House and once again, it was a huge hit. 
“Among the delicacies of Jewish American cooking, chopped liver is surely one of the greatest.  Its ingredients are humble:  Chicken livers, onions, eggs, salt, pepper and schmaltz.  As anyone with a knowledge of Jewish American idiom will tell you, schmaltz and its adjectival schmaltzy  means something that is over-done, over-decorated, over-emotional, over-the-top.  Schmaltz is chicken fat.  And when you put it together with the other ingredients in chopped liver, you have an appetizer that is unquestionably over the top.   It is a marvelous taste, rich and satisfying and rivaling any great pate.