HELPING FAMILY FARMS FLOURISH. HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY.
Showing posts with label Peruvian Food. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Peruvian Food. Show all posts

Monday, April 23, 2012

Back to Bonito in St. Barth and our take on their wonderful Peruvian Tiradito of Tuna


Bonito's Version of Tiradito de Thon
And mine...
Unfortunately, mine didn't come with this view from Bonito


Rue Lubin Brin
Gustavia, St. Barthelemy FWI
(590)0590-279-696
www.ilovebonito.com
         Silken fish coated in citrus and soy, the earthy nuttiness of sesame oil, the sweetness of crabmeat and the crunch of perfectly dressed seaweed salad, that's the explosion of taste that left me, a month later, wistful for another plate of Tiradito of Tuna.  In my earlier post, “15 Things you really must eat in St. Barth”, I promised that I would share the recipe for the fantastic "ceviche" we ate at Bonito, a wonderful hillside restaurant overlooking Gustavia’s beautiful harbor. And  the food at Bonito is every bit as magnificent as the view.  The well-travelled chef, Laurent Cantineaux, has brought influences from all over.  Chef Cantineaux has worked at Daniel, here in New York, for Guy Savoy and the Troisgros brothers in France and then landed in Caracas, Venezuela where he was the Executive Chef at CafĂ© Atlantique. There must have been a side trip to Peru at some point because Peru in the birthplace of the Tiradito.  Without question, Chef Cantineaux' tiraditos are reason alone to head directly to Bonito right after you’ve touched down in St. Barth.

Monday, October 3, 2011

Peruvian Steak and Potato Stir-Fry Or Lomo Saltado courtesy of Grace Parisi of Food and Wine



At the Mercado Central in Santiago,
you can dine on all the fresh seafood
 from the market...
even if you're not entirely sure what it is.

         I’ve had the good fortune to travel to South America several times.  But I have only touched down in Peru. On my way back from Santiago de Chile, our plane made a stop there.  I must confess that Chilean food left me a little cold.  The Chileans will basically eat anything that comes out of the sea. While that befits a country that is a sliver of land an average of 110 miles wide with a 2653 mile Pacific coastline, it leads to eating all manner of sea creatures. Many of these look strangely like barnacles.  In fact, I think it would be possible to eat an entire seafood dinner at the famous Marcado Central without being able to identify a single thing on your plate.  The only meal I relished in Santiago was at a Brazillian steak house.  By the time we got there, I was dying for some bife.  I should have gone next door…to Argentina. Now there’s a country that is a fantastic place to eat – especially if you’re mad for meat.  I am a complete carnivore but after my last trip, I had an appointment with my cardiologist who asked what in god’s name I’d been eating.  Apparently I’d had at least one beef empanada too many.  But when I saw this recipe for a dish with Peruvian roots, it had some important things to recommend it.