HELPING FAMILY FARMS FLOURISH. HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY.
Showing posts with label Pork Dishes. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Pork Dishes. Show all posts

Friday, February 8, 2013

What to serve for Chinese New Year? David Chang’s Bo Ssam, slow-roasted Pork with Ginger-Scallion Sauce, Ssam Sauce, Kimchi and Rice


Center this dish on your dining table and stand back.
        Chinese New Year is upon us.  This Sunday, February 10th is the start of the Year of the Snake. Despite all the negative connotations of snakes and snake-like behavior,  according to Chinese Horoscopes the year 2013 symbolizes action, energy, leadership and vitality. This year, the snake is obligated to do its best for the good of others.  All in all 2013 is seen as a good year.  So there's something to celebrate.  And I can't think of a better way than to serve this phenomenal dish. Not only will it bring Asia to your table for a New Year's celebration, the leftovers can be turned into a decidedly American dish--pulled pork and an Italian one--pasta sauce.  I'll save those recipes for a future post.  Today belongs to Bo Ssam, the brain child of David Chang, everyone’s favorite renegade chef.  
         Chef Chang's tiny Momofuku Ssam Bar, on a decidedly unfashionable strip of lower Second Avenue (207 2nd avenue new york, NY 10003), is perpetually packed.  David is a particular favorite of ours and not only because he loves one of our absolute favorite Montreal restaurants --Joe Beef-- so much (http://www.chewingthefat.us.com/2011/10/next-stop-in-montreal-homage-to-joe.html), that he wrote the introduction to its cookbook.  David Chang is inventive, highly skilled and most of all, magnanimous.  If you need proof of that last characteristic, consider his sharing this particular recipe: He has included it in his Momofuku cookbook (Clarkson Potter 2009) even though it is such a hit at his eponymous restaurant that, even at $200, a 6 to 10 person Bo SSam has to be ordered well in advance.  But here’s the incredible thing:  You can make this amazing dish at home for well under $40.00!  Now if that sounds like some kind carnival barker talking, it’s because I was astonished at how good it is and, quite frankly, while I am not a complete skinflint, nothing makes me happier than a great food bargain.  Particularly one that tastes this good.

Tuesday, May 29, 2012

Darina Allen's Pork Chops with Sage, Ina Garten's Roasted Asparagus with Parmesan and my own Smashed Potatoes


          I am amazed at how many people ask me for menus with a maximum of five ingredients.  I do understand:  You look at a long recipe and think that’s too much work, or I’m missing one of the spices or who has time for this?  So I was amazed when I put together an entire entrée course with just six ingredients!  The center of the plate pork chop requires olive oil and fresh sage.  The Roasted Asparagus requires a bit more olive oil and some freshly grated Parmesan cheese bringing us up to four ingredients. Finally, I served these with smashed potatoes topped with a little unsalted butter.  That’s numbers five and six.  Well, I did use a little salt and pepper but wow!  And the dinner was delicious.  The pork was juicy and tender. The asparagus flavor is transformed when they’re roasted and enhanced with the cheese.  And the buttery smashed potatoes are the perfect complement to everything on the plate.   And the whole thing is on the table in no time.  With so little labor involved, you almost feel like you’ve cheated.

Thursday, May 3, 2012

Pork Cutlets with Pine Nuts and Prosciutto “Lombatine ‘Vestite’ ai Pinoli”


         Here we have a simple pork cutlet or chop that is covered with juicy bits of golden raisin, salty, tangy capers, and rich Gran Padano cheese.   This sweet and salty, cheese-y topping is held in place by crisp slices of prosciutto.  For a pork lover like me, the dish is just about perfection.
         I’ve mentioned my fondness for “La Cucina Italiana” magazine before.  The 83 year old magazine got its start in Italy in 1929.  The US edition is a Johnny-come-lately by comparison.  It launched here late in 2007.  The magazine has an American editor named Michael Wilson who somehow makes every issue like a trip to Italy. And it maintains its Italian-ness by keeping the recipe titles in Italian and translating them in much smaller type below.  Somehow that adds to the feeling that this is truly Italian cooking.  Features about various regions of Italy make for a good read.  Ingredient features like the current issue’s one on Italian Beer introduce you to the people behind the brews.  And two more, one on beans, the other on strawberries, give you more than enough ways to put authentic recipes on your table. This "La Cucina" even takes you outside the kitchen door with “Start an Italian Garden”. But hands down, one of my favorite sections is called “In Cucina” (In the Kitchen).  That’s where you’ll find “Cooking School” which gives you an in-depth understanding of cooking techniques.  But it’s “Cooking by the Clock” that inevitably turns me on.  Today’s post is no exception. 

Monday, February 6, 2012

Sausages and Potato Ragout a la Jacques Pepin



         I wish you had seen the look on Andrew’s face when he asked what was for dinner and I told him “Sausages and Potatoes”.  Was that a sneer or a recoiling?  Was he horrified or merely surprised?  You see, I had just that day received my copy of “Essential Pepin” (Houghton Mifflin 2011), the 700 recipe volume that caps the illustrious career of one the great ‘pioneers’ of good cooking in this country, Jacques Pepin.  Surely, Andrew must have thought, you could do better than this, especially for a first choice in this incredible collection.  Surely in a book that features virtually every French classic and an amazingly broad range of recipes representing Asia, India, China-- I could have found something more profound than sausage and potatoes.  But it was a winter night and I’d espied some beautiful fresh Italian sausages at the market that day.  And the whole dish looked amazingly easy.

Monday, January 9, 2012

Spicy Pork Chops with Green Chiles, Roasted Red Peppers and Onions Adapted from Fine Cooking Magazine



         Usually, I soft-pedal the whole issue of heat in the recipes I share with you.  That’s because I think a lot of people are uneasy about any food that’s described as spicy.  I do get it.  What’s the pleasure in having your mouth feel like it’s on fire?  Or breaking out in a cold sweat after a bite or two?  Usually when I do share a spicier dish, I tell you that cutting back on Cayenne or eliminating the seeds in Jalapenos will yield a kinder, gentler dish.  But today, I am not going to do that.  This version of plain old Pork Chops gets its character from a really great combination of spicy-hot ingredients.  And let’s face it, pork chops can use the help.

Monday, August 8, 2011

Sizzling Pork Tacos with Tomatillo Salsa and Salsa Crudo adapted from the New York Times




A Basketful of Tomatillos
         Summer cooking should be as easy as this every day of the week.  These tacos are great fun to make.   Sitting around the table with a stack of corn tortillas, filling as many as you like with a delicious stuffing of pork and two salsas is summer at its simplest.   The salsas, which you put together in a matter of minutes, take full advantage of summer’s ripe tomatoes and freshly harvested onions. It’s also a great way to discover the tomatillo—if you haven’t already.  In Mexico, they’re called “tomate verde” and they are the backbone of salsa verde and any number of both fresh and cooked green sauces throughout Latin America.  This dish has its roots in Mexico but let’s be honest, tacos are as American as apple pie at this point.  And that only makes life easier since you can readily find everything you need at your supermarket.