HELPING FAMILY FARMS FLOURISH. HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY.
Showing posts with label Potatoes. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Potatoes. Show all posts

Monday, August 4, 2014

Summer Favorites: Summer Panzanella Salad 2 Ways and Crispy Smashed Roasted Potatoes from Fine Cooking

Top to Bottom:  Panzanella Salad, Crispy Smashed Roasted Potatoes
Panzanella Salad with Tuna 

         Sometimes I am astonished at what’s not on Chewing the Fat.  Just when I start to worry that I’ll never find a recipe that I haven’t already tried, I discover amazing gaps in our collection.  Take these two recipes, which I have been making for a whole lot longer than I’ve been blogging.  The first is an Italian classic.  Just as the season’s tomatoes can’t get any sweeter and riper, I love to make this easy offering of garlick-y toasted peasant bread, red onions, olive oil, vinegar and basil.  The salad has its origins in Tuscany and is a specialty of Firenze.  It’s one of those gifts of ingenuity to la cucina from the poor for whom every scrap of bread was put to use.  Almost every Italian cookbook has a recipe for this salad and you can find plenty of recipes far more complex than the one I share here.  My old and dearly remembered friend, Marcella Hazan, made hers with capers, bell pepper, anchovy filets, and cucumbers added to the tomatoes and red onions.  Today, I bring you the most basic of all Panzanella  recipes.  And thanks to Bebe Caggiano, the Italian-American food writer and chef, the next day you can lunch on the leftovers by adding  canned tuna and fresh basil to last night’s salad.  The crunch is gone but replacing it are intensely flavored ‘croutons’ and marinated tomatoes.  It’s so simple!

Thursday, September 26, 2013

Since I'm on my way there today, a recipe for Quebec’s own Poutine (French Fries with Gravy and Cheese)

"Poutine", a fine "mess" and Quebec's gift to Gastronomy...
or Gluttony as in this version from Au Pied de Cochon topped with Foie Gras
Vieux Montreal, a perfect base to explore Old and New Montreal
         As New Yorkers, we’re inclined to feel that our city is superior to almost everywhere else on earth.  And as far food goes, we’re the ultimate snobs. After all, there are now over 24,000 restaurants here  Who can hold a candle to that?

Monday, December 10, 2012

2 Hanukkah Favorites from Ina Garten: Simplest Ever Potato Latkes and Baked Applesauce



The Shammash being used to light the
candles on the Hanakkah Menorah
         Saturday was the first day of Hanakkah, the Jewish Festival of Lights.  The holiday, which is celebrated every December, commemorates the time when a small army of Jews defeated the Syrian King Antiochus IV (ca 215-164 B.C.) who had taken over Jerusalem and vowed to destroy Judaism.  Antiochus had filled the Jewish temple with Syrian idols.  In a surprise attack, led by Judas Maccabee, the small Jewish force recaptured Jerusalem and reclaimed their temple.  But when they went to light their holy lamps, they found only a single vial of oil. Lo and behold, this tiny amount of oil kept the lights burning for eight days.  This was declared a miracle.  Now, during the eight days of Hanakkah, every night celebrants light a candle in a Menorah (a candle holder with places for 9 candles ). They also exchange small gifts and make donations to the poor.  The ninth candle, called the shammash, has only one purpose: to light the other eight.  Since no Jewish festival of any kind is unaccompanied by glorious food, Hannakah is no exception.  And of all the dishes served, none is more closely linked to the Festival of Lights than the latke or potato pancake.  And of course, there’s a story attached to the Hannakah latke as well.  And it’s a doozy.

Friday, November 16, 2012

Thanksgiving 101: Gratin of Sweet Potatoes and Leeks



        My friend Betty once told me a riotous story of being invited to a Thanksgiving dinner and being asked to "bring something".  When she arrived on the big day, there were 12, count 'em, sweet potato casseroles.  Lesson learned: If you're going 'potluck' on Turkey Day, assign the side dishes.  And you couldn't do much better than this deliciously rich gratin. It's a true example of  over-the-top Thanksgiving cooking. Fair warning…this is one of the richest things (aka fatty) I’ve made in a very long time.  But it was so delicious and really satisfying in tiny portions that I’d make again in a heartbeat…assuming I still had a pulse after consuming the pancetta and cream involved in the dish.
The other great thing about this dish is that it benefits from being made ahead. You can put the whole thing together a couple of days in advance and take it right up to the baking stage on the big day.  It also is very forgiving and can be cooked longer than the time given which is always a huge help when you're putting together your Thanksgiving dinner.  Another advantage to it's timing is that it's a lot easier to serve in beautiful little squares if it rests before serving.
All in all, it's a winner in every way.

Thursday, March 3, 2011

Lauren’s Roast Chicken and a side of Roasted Fingerling Potatoes with Horseradish Dressing


       They say that the mark of a good cook is whether they can deliver a perfect Roast Chicken.  Perfect…as  deeply juicy and tender meat covered with the crispest and crunchiest skin.  Frankly, I have never been satisfied with my Roast Chicken.  I’ve tried everything from Marcella Hazan’s very simple recipe of stuffing a bird with a lemon and an onion.  I’ve tried sitting the bird atop a medley of onions, carrots and shallots.  I’ve buttered and herbed under the skin.  I’ve rubbed chickens with canola and olive oils.  I’ve cooked them at every temperature imaginable from 325 to 550 degrees.   I have brined birds, cooked kosher ones and free-rangers and organic offerings.  Never have I cracked the Roast Chicken code. Until now.  And I did it with Andrew’s sister Lauren’s recipe.  And it’s insanely easy. 

Monday, November 22, 2010

Gratin of Sweet Potatoes and Leeks and other Thanksgiving delights



It's Thanksgiving and if ever there was a time to cook, this is it.  I love this holiday. Like many people who weren't born in this country, I see this day as a true celebration of America.  And in its inclusion of everyone-- regardless of what religion they do or do not practice --it is a celebration of us all.  And it doesn't hurt that the food we serve is some of the most delicious we make all year. And clearly the most bountiful. 

Today's post is truly an example of over-the-top Thanksgiving cooking.   Fair warning…this is one of the richest things (aka fatty) I’ve made in a very long time.  But it was so delicious and really satisfying in tiny portions that I’d make again in a heartbeat…assuming I still had a pulse after consuming the pancetta and cream involved in the dish.


Monday, June 14, 2010

Simple Lamb Chops with two delicious sides: Stir-Fried Bok Choy with Ginger and Parmesan Smashed Potatoes



        One of the best buys at Costco are the loin lamb chops.  You get 10 of them for about $17.00.  The last time I looked at loin lamb chops at Fairway, they were over $17.00 a lb.  I’ve been wanting to write about them and kept searching for something amazing to do with them.   My usual preparation was just to douse them with lots of Lea and Perrin’s Worcestershire sauce, broil them quickly 6 minutes on one side, 4 on the other.   They’re always delicious but I was looking for something “different” to share with you.

Friday, April 23, 2010

“Pollo al Mattone”-- Chicken under a Brick





When I was doing some research for this post, I discovered that this method of cooking chicken is pictured in Etruscan frescoes.  Given that the Etruscan era ended roughly around 500 B.C., this is unquestionably the oldest recipe I’ve ever shared with you.  And it’s age explains why the translation of the word “mattone” is “paver” in English.   The Etruscans used a stone to weigh down the bird to both flatten it and make its skin extra crispy.  As you’ll see below, with no bricks around, I finally found a use for my free weights…


Monday, April 12, 2010

Sole Almandine and the perfect accompaniment, Lemon Smashed Potatoes


     
         I love shopping in Chinatown.  Just coming out of the subway at Grand Street is like being transported to Hong Kong.   Except that the parts of Hong Kong I’m familiar with have a lot more Westerners than New York’s Chinatown does.  Except for Mulberry street and its plethora of red Sauce Italian places offering a free glass of wine to the overwhelmingly tourist crowd,   Chinatown has pretty well taken over what was once Little Italy. And food shopping there is a terrific experience.  If only it were closer, I could save a fortune.  The prices are simply astonishing.  How about 3 lemons for a dollar?  Or a huge knob of ginger for .70 cents? And how about the freshest Gray sole, beautifully filleted, for $3.95 a lb?  Seriously!


Friday, March 12, 2010

Smoked Salmon and Potato Breakfast Casserole


       The food pantry that our church sponsors is called The Brown Bag Program and provides lunch for about 80 people a day.  It costs about $3.25 to fill a bag and, like every other charity in the City, we’ve been feeling the pinch of the recession.  The numbers needing help are up and the help is down.  To publicize our plight, we hosted a breakfast at Christ and St. Stephen’s and I made this delicious and different breakfast casserole.  What’s great about it is that you can do the whole thing the night before, chill it and bake it in the morning.
I’m sharing the recipe for 6 servings because if you’re not feeding an Army, salvation or otherwise, you won’t need the quantity I was making.  But you certainly can double it for a crowd.  For the recipe all you have to do is scroll down.  And if you’d like to contribute to The Brown Bag Program, all you have to do is follow this link: http://www.csschurch.org


Thursday, February 25, 2010

Brisket of Beef with Fingerling Potatoes and Maple-Glazed Carrots


I am quite serious when I say that this is the easiest dinner you will ever make. If you have any qualms about your skills in the kitchen, put them to rest and put these recipes to work for you.  They virtually cook themselves.  There’s a brisket of beef that requires chopping and slicing some onions, and turning the meat a couple of times and that’s it.  Honestly.  With it, a recipe for fingerling potatoes from Alex Guarnaschelli, the chef at Butter and a frequent visitor on Food Network TV.  This is so simple, it will amaze you at how much taste you’ll get out of the potatoes.  Finally, maple-glazed carrots that are poached, buttered and glazed in all of about 10 minutes.  Buy something store-bought for dessert, crack open a bottle of Cabernet and astonish all your friends at your cooking prowess.  And I'll even show you how to make the most delicious sandwich from the leftovers.



Monday, January 18, 2010

On the menu today: Chili Rubbed Flank Steaks, Duck Fat Hash Browns and Austrian White Asparagus



Lately, we’ve been loving flank steak.  What’s not to love about the supremely beefy flavor of this chewy cut of meat—especially when it’s one of the great bargains at the meat counter?  It’s currently less than half the price of a New York strip—but hurry, because it’s been my experience that supply and demand take over (witness the price of Osso Buco (link), it will shoot up as more people discover its versatility and flavor.  And then there’s the speed at which you can get it on the table.  It’s a perfect cut of beef for a weeknight.



Sunday, January 3, 2010

Golden Potatoes with Caper Brown-Butter Crumbs



More frequently than I wish, something absolutely delicious that I want to share with you simply doesn’t photograph as appetizingly as I would hope. Sometimes, I have to make a judgment as to whether the photograph is just going make everyone want to turn the page. But then there are dishes like this one; such a flavor hit that I don’t want you to miss it, even if it isn’t the most photogenic.