HELPING FAMILY FARMS FLOURISH. HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY.
Showing posts with label Rice. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Rice. Show all posts

Monday, May 19, 2014

Chicken Paella with Sugar Snap Peas in about an hour!



        There's no one dish supper quite on the level of a great paella.  It combines protein--sometimes several of them--with carbohydrates and then, for good measure, adds some vegetables. The one big drawback to paella is the interminable time a good one takes to make.  So this recipe from Bon Appetit caught my eye when the magazine put it in a feature called ‘Fresh and Easy Dinners’. It actually toppped their list, and was pictured on their cover.  If you’re ever had a paella in Spain, you know it is hardly ‘quick’ and involves a special paella pan. But this one uses any heavy skillet you have on hand and gets dinner on the table in about an hour.  Considering my memories of paella, that's simply astonishing.

Thursday, September 12, 2013

Oven-Roasted Shrimp and Sausage Paella

           
The genuine article as seen in Spain
Paella is, hands down, the dish most associated with Spain.  Prior to the emergence of tapas on tables everywhere and Ferran Adria’s molecular gastronomy, I’d venture to say, it was the only food most people thought of when they thought of Spanish cooking. However, in that country, it’s a dish associated with one province: Valencia on the East Coast.  Valencian cooks regard it as one of the identifying symbols of their province.   It’s one of those dishes that has so many variations, it’s possible to call any dish made with short-grained Spanish rice a Paella.  This is particularly true since the word “Paella” actually refers to the pan the dish is cooked in.  From there, it gets even more complicated because Valencians use the word “Paella” for all pans, including the specialized shallow one used for cooking Paellas. Plus, there’s no master recipe for Paella. Every cook seems to have their own version and sticks rigidly to their family recipe as the only way to cook paella. Recently, we were having a dinner party for more guests than usual. Because of all I'd read about Paella, I felt I had permission to go with something of my own creation. I liberally borrowed from several recipes to end up with what made the dish popular in the first place:  Because it makes for a great party.

Monday, October 22, 2012

It's Texas Week on Chewing the Fat! First Up, Lauren's Roast Pork Tenderloin with Honeyed Apples and Pecans courtesy of James Villas and a Wild Rice Pilaf. And on Thursday, Kristi's own recipe for Harvest Soup.




         It was quite a coincidence when Andrew came back from his trip to Dallas with not one but two dishes his sister Lauren served him while he was there.  And that same day, my dear friend Kristi, sent along an original recipe of her own.  So I thought this week we’d salute our Texas friends and family with these great dishes, which are just perfect for any fall table. Lauren is a superb cook and her recipes have appeared here before...her Roast Chicken is the best I've ever eaten http://www.chewingthefat.us.com/2011/03/laurens-roast-chicken-and-side-of.html  and talk about Texan...her Blueberry Jalapeno sauce has hundreds of hits. http://www.chewingthefat.us.com/2010/06/lauren-readys-pork-loin-with-blueberry.html. So when Lauren writes "We love this!" on a recipe, I sit up and take notice.
Country Gardens last weekend
         Pork seems to lend itself to cooking with fruit of all kinds. How many times have you seen applesauce served on the side with a grilled pork chop?   This is a far more sophisticated pairing, a stuffing made of apples and pecans and scallions soaked in honey and stuffed into pork tenderloin.  And it couldn’t be more seasonal.  It’s high Apple season in Bridgehampton where the Farm Stand was loaded with local varieties that have just been harvested.  In this dish, the tart and tangy Granny Smith is used, a perfect counterbalance to the crunch of the pecans and sweetness of the honey.   I confess to having been intimidated with the task of carefully carving a pocket for the stuffing. But I managed with the use of a sharp 10-inch knife, which I carefully slipped into the meat and ran down the length of the tenderloin stopping at one inch from the end.  I needn’t have been so anxious: I prepped this dinner out in Bridgehampton, brought it into town and asked Andrew if it looked like his sister’s.  Hers, he informed me, was butterflied, the stuffing laid into the crease of the meat and then tied with twine in multiple places.  The stuffing oozed out the top and, he said, looked perfectly fine.  She’d also made an ideal side dish with the pork—a Wild Rice Pilaf with Mushrooms.  An old Texas favorite?  Quite the contrary, it’s a Minnesota specialty that highlights their locally grown rice.  Given our recent “Arsenic in Rice” and that Texas rice is high on that list, the Minnesota connection came as a relief.

Monday, September 24, 2012

Chicken, Cashew and Spinach Stir-Fry adapted from Gourmet Magazine



         If I could teach one technique that is perfect for weeknight cooking, it would be the stir-fry.  It is the absolutely ideal last minute dinner when you’re not entirely sure when everyone’s getting home.  You put everything in place in advance.  Then, when whomever you are cooking for arrives at the door, you’re ready to have dinner on the table in moments.  In the case of this Asian inspired version of a stir-fry, the cooking time adds up to all of 12 minutes max. That’s kind of hard to beat.  And hard to beat too are the flavors and textures of this dish. The tender chicken, the crunch of the cashews and red pepper, a hint of spice from the red pepper flakes, the green of the spinach—they all come together in a silken sauce that’s better than any Chinese take-out. Come to think of it, if you ordered Chinese, it would probably take longer to get to you than this dinner does. You’ll notice that I served this dish without any sides.  The obvious choice would be a bed of fluffy white rice. But we sometimes skip the carbs and then of course, there’s the matter of Arsenic in Rice.

Monday, April 9, 2012

Eric Ripert’s Shrimp in Coconut Curry Sauce with Caribbean Fried Rice

Chef Ripert with the Sting Rays the Caymans are famous for
         I’ve mentioned my fondness for Eric Ripert on these pages before.  He’s one chef whose recipes really translate for the home cook.  His flavors are bright and inventive and nothing shows this off better than these two delicious dishes.  Since we’re barely off the plane from the Caribbean, I couldn’t resist extending our stay by making them for a weeknight dinner last week.  I am not going to say that these are ten minute mains.  There’s a fair amount of slicing, chopping and dicing involved in both.  But the end certainly justifies the means and just look how at how gorgeous your dinner plate will look.

Monday, May 17, 2010

Chicken with Taragon and Garlic Sauce Rice and Corn Salad with Lemon Dressing


        This recipe will add to your Chicken repertoire with an easy weeknight preparation that packs a lot of flavor into any BLSL* chicken breast you come across. It’s from the most recent issue of Bon Appetit (May 2010).  But the really wonderful discovery for me was the Rice Salad that was served along with it.

*BoneLess, SkinLess


Wednesday, May 12, 2010

Vietnamese Shrimp and Pork Belly with Sweet and Spicy Sauce





Ever since my last trip to Hong Kong, where, on our last night there, we went to a Vietnamese Restaurant called “Pho Lemon” (25 Elgin St. Central, TEL: 2523-8272) I have wanted to cook Vietnamese food.  There’s likely nowhere on earth where you can find such a confluence of Asian cuisine as there is in Hong Kong.  During my last trip there, we’d eaten Japanese, Korean, Malaysian and of course, Chinese food from Hunanese to Cantonese.  Fantastic food in some of the finest places in the city.   So when, on that particular night, I had a roast chicken that was one of the finest I had ever eaten, I was determined to learn how to cook it. 


Tuesday, January 5, 2010

Review of “Jamie’s Food Revolution” from Jamie Oliver and a recipe for a Quick and Easy Chicken Curry





The first post on Chewing the Fat was about Jamie Oliver’s Beef and Guinness Pie so if you’ve been with us for the whole ride, you know I am a huge fan of the man. I was very pleased to see his latest book show up under the Christmas tree (“Jamie’s Food Revolution”, Hyperion 2009 $26.25 at http://www.amazon.com/). It is both a book and a crusade. The crusade is to counter some really pretty dreadful statistics about eating in America and in Jamie’s native Britain. Did you have any idea that fewer than a third of Americans cook their dinners from scratch these days? Or worse, that although 75 % of us eat most of our meals at home, over half of those dinners are fast food, delivery or takeout? Or even worse, that Americans spent more money on fast food in 2007 than they did on education? But Jamie has a plan.

Monday, November 9, 2009

Review of Fatty Crab and a recipe for a one-dish wonder called Nasi Goreng with Shrimp





I can’t get enough of Fatty Crab www.fattycrab.com  2170Broadway (76th-77th St.)212-496-2722 for reservations or http://www.opentable.com/), the spinoff of the original West Village restaurant (634 Hudson Street, between Horatio and Gansevoort Sts., 212 352-3592 (No reservations taken).

Now that it’s made the trek north to the Upper West Side, it’s become one of our two favorite Asian restaurants. It’s a funky place born of owner Zak Pelaccio’s love affair with Malaysian cooking following a stint cooking and eating in Kuala Lumpur.