HELPING FAMILY FARMS FLOURISH. HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY.
Showing posts with label Salads. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Salads. Show all posts

Monday, July 21, 2014

Melissa Clark's Roasted Heirloom Carrot Salad with Miso Dressing



David Santos and Melissa Clark
        

While I’ve been familiar with heirloom tomatoes for several years now, this year was my introduction to heirloom carrots in, of all places, Trader Joe’s.  It was there that I first saw a 2 lb. bag labeled Rainbow Carrots.   Last time I checked a rainbow had considerably more colors than these do but for all of us who grew up thinking carrots were a distinct shade of orange, these were real eye-openers.  They ranged from deep red through several shades of orange and to an almost white carrot that looked more like a parsnip.  The first time I cooked them, I leaned on my standard preparation, which involves boiling peeled whole carrots until they are tender, then quickly glazing them with some butter and brown sugar.  I can’t say that I noticed any real difference in taste between the various colors but if nothing else, they were a conversation starter.  Then I saw that Melissa Clark had written a recipe for them in her “Restaurant Takeaway” column in the Times.  The column is devoted to restaurant dishes that Melissa has whipped up making them accessible to home cooks by tweaking and testing then in hers.  And we should all thank her for this.  And certainly a word of thanks is due to David Santos, from whose Louro Restaurant (142 West 10th St. at Waverly Place) Tel: (212) 206-0606 www.louronyc.com) Melissa purloined the recipe.

Monday, May 12, 2014

Strawberry Spinach Salad

 
Did you know May is National Strawberry month?  Neither did I. But a couple of weeks ago, I was left with a clamshell half-filled with beautiful Driscoll strawberries that I didn’t want to see going to waste. Driscoll is not a species of strawberry. It’s a privately held company in Watsonville, California that’s been owned by the same family for over 100 years now.   It has a huge payroll, employing over 40,000 people around the world developing, growing and harvesting all kinds of berries: Raspberries, Blackberries, Blueberries and, of course, Strawberries both organic and conventionally grown.   It’s also a company with a shining history of giving back:  After World War II, Driscoll’s helped Japanese Americans, newly released from the internment camps they were held in, become sharecroppers for the company.  And Driscoll is a major supporter of Natividad Medical Center in Salinas, CA where it provides translators for speakers of Central America’s indigenous languages: Zapotec, Mixteco and Triqui. Driscoll is one of those companies I feel privileged to buy from. 

Monday, May 5, 2014

Enchiladas Suizas with Mexican Cole Slaw



The Battle of Puebla
       Once again we're celebrating Cinco de Mayo with a tried and true favorite.  This post is the # 2 most viewed page in all of Chewing the Fat's history.   This sensational recipe for Enchiladas is hundreds of page views ahead of # 3.  The second recipe on the page, the one for Mexican Cole Slaw, is certainly reason too for its popularity.  Our records show hundreds of searches for the dish that have wound up on these pages.  So with Cinco de Mayo today, I wanted to share these two great dishes and wish you "Feliz Cinco de Mayo". And I wanted to share a little of the fiesta's history with you.  So here goes:  
      Cinco de Mayo, the celebration of all things Mexican, isn’t really celebrated in Mexico.  It is true that it commemorates the defeat by the Mexican Army of French troops in the Battle of Puebla on May 5th 1862.  However, only the state of Puebla shares the party spirit that is such a part of Cinco de Mayo in the US.   The rest of Mexico waits until September 15th to celebrate their Independence Day.  So how did Cinco de Mayo get to be an American tradition?  Apparently the holiday was created spontaneously by Mexicans and Latinos living in California during the American Civil War.  They supported the fragile cause of defending freedom and democracy by celebrating the unlikely victory by a Mexican Army over the greater fire power of France.   Who knew? 

Thursday, January 23, 2014

Almond's Brussels Sprouts Hot and Cold and a Carb-Free Stuffed Pork Chop with Dijon Mustard Sauce



        
Jason Weiner with an
un-Monte's Ham
From the moment Almond Restaurant opened 12 years ago in an old roadhouse in Bridgehampton, it’s been a smash hit.  (It’s also been 
featured here before http://www.chewingthefat.us.com/2011/06/roasted-asparagus-with-lardons-and.html).  We quickly became regulars drawn by the consistently great food that comes out of Chef Jason Weiner’s kitchen and the wonderful front of the house atmosphere presided over Chef Weiner’s business partner, the inimitable Eric Lemonides.  These two childhood friends have built their careers at some of America’s best restaurants. Jason helped open San Francisco’s
Eric Lemonides in Paris...
last seen in St. Moritz.
Aqua the same year that Eric became General Manager at Piemonte Ovest at the ripe old ages of 24.  But they both came home to roost bringing with them Jason’s farm to table philosophy and Eric’s brilliant way with people. In 2001 they first opened Almond, now at 1 Ocean Road in Bridgehampton (Tel: 631-537-5665) and  in 2008 they took New York by storm with Almond NYC at 12 East 22nd St. (Tel: 212-228-7557).  

Thursday, October 3, 2013

The Saga of Thousand Island Dressing and the Original Recipe for it!

        

I just came back from the Thousand Islands, a natural wonder that occurs where the Great Lakes pour into the St. Lawrence River.  These islands range in size from tiny outcroppings in the river to islands where there are farms and dozens of families living on them year ‘round.   Most, however, are home to seasonal summer homes accessible only by boat.  There are well over a thousand of them, 1864 to be exact, scattered along a fifty mile downstream stretch from Kingston, Ontario.  To qualify as an island, the land must be above water level all year round, have an area of at least one square foot and support at least one living tree.  Those islands that are not a part of the province of Ontario are all located in New York State.  Boat tours leave from both sides of the border, pointing out the homes of the rich and famous, who summered here at the turn of the 19 th century.  Among those is one of the greatest rock piles I’ve ever seen, Boldt Castle.  It’s the subject of much legend and romance.  And it’s part of the intrigue surrounding Thousand Island Salad Dressing.

Thursday, September 5, 2013

Heirloom Tomatoes with Creamy Corn Buttermilk Basil Dressing


         My friend Edward told me he’d recently had dinner in Manhattan and was served an unforgettable heirloom tomato salad.  Atop a stack of perfectly ripe tomatoes, a corn and cream dressing made the tomatoes even more irresistible.  Since both corn and tomatoes are still flooding farm stands and farmer’s markets, I wanted to share my version of this terrific salad.  But hurry. In no time, the tomatoes will disappear and with them, the sweet corn of summer.  So make this this weekend and I can almost guarantee, you’ll dream about it this winter.

Thursday, August 22, 2013

Two Salads adapted from Ina Garten: Roasted Shrimp and Orzo and Beets with Orange Vinaigrette





         Recipes that other cooks invent should be treated with great respect.  I’ve mentioned before that few things put me off more than someone commenting on a dish—very often negatively—that they have ‘doctored’ beyond recognition.   Still, if you do delve into the comments, you can certainly learn something and sometimes there’s a certain universality of opinion that is worth paying attention to.  In the case of today’s offerings, I didn’t make a single change to Ina Garten’s Beets with Orange Vinaigrette.  It’s a winner just as it is.  But when I got to Roasted Shrimp with Orzo, two things made me alter the original and, if I may be so bold, they were spectacular changes.

Monday, July 8, 2013

Farmers' Market Salad with Buttermilk-Chive Dressing from "flour, too" by Joanne Chang


Our Farmers' Markets are brimming with more and more produce every week.  The carrots and beans, tomatoes and radishes are in and the Red Bliss potatoes are still baby-sized and beautiful.  So you can imagine my delight at opening Joanne Chang’s latest cookbook, “flour,too” (Chronicle Books 2013) and discovering the perfect recipe to put them all together.  Joanne Chang’s recipes are a regular feature on Chewing the Fat.  Pastry Chef Chang’s takes on classic American desserts from homemade Oreos http://www.chewingthefat.us.com/2012/03/joanne-changs-recipe-for-homemade-oreo.html to the most recent post featuring Strawberry shortcakes http://www.chewingthefat.us.com/2013/06/joanne-changs-balsamic-strawberry.html are extremely popular, not just with Andrew but with all our readers.  Now, in “flour, too” her recipe files have been expanded to include savories from her Flour Bakeries and Cafes in Boston.  This is huge boon to savory cooks like me.  But fear not.  Chef Chang's new cookbook includes enough sweetness to satisfy both the baker and the cook in our house. 

Thursday, June 27, 2013

A melange of Asparagus and any Green Spring Vegetable you'd like


        
Asparagus season is here and we can’t get enough of the stuff. I’ve already served it in last year’s spicy stir-fry with chiles. http://www.chewingthefat.us.com/2011/05/spicy-pork-with-asparagus-and-chile.htmld. And then as a dinner salad that makes a meatless meal  http://www.chewingthefat.us.com/2011/05/spicy-pork-with-asparagus-and-chile.html and then of course, there’s roasted asparagus which can be served as a side dish,an appetizer or, adding an egg, a light supper: 
http://www.chewingthefat.us.com/2011/06/roasted-asparagus-with-lardons-and.html.  Now to add to our collection of asparagus recipes, comes this symphony of green.  It combines not only tender asparagus spears but Spring’s green beans or haricots verts, Fava beans or Edaname, baby peas—even lettuce if you’d like.  It started off as a recipe in La Cucina Italiana magazine entitled “Primizie verdi con scamorza e olio picante” or Green Spring Salad with Scamorza and Spicy Olive Oil.  You’ll notice there’s not one word about Asparagus in the name of the recipe.  But on closer inspection,
Asparagus was a key ingredient among several others. At a recent dinner party we gave, instead of offering up steamed, boiled or roasted asparagus exactly like everyone’s been eating it since asparagus season began, this gave us the chance to introduce it with several other Spring vegetables. The result is a side dish that looks like you went to an inordinate amount of trouble to make.  In fact, it’s amazingly easy.  And what I also discovered was this is an incredibly adaptable recipe and that you can use virtually any green vegetable you’d like.

Thursday, May 23, 2013

Memorial Day Weekend! Time to bring out the Orange and Soy-Glazed Ribs and Coleslaw with Apple and Yogurt Dressing to go with them!


         

        The Un-Official start of summer officially starts this Friday. Out our way, that generally means a lot of premature wearing of summer clothes because we’ll still have a couple of weeks before it gets warm. The cool nights won’t stop the grill fanatics. They’ll haul out their Webers or open up their monster gas grills even if the temperature dips into the 50s.  I love their dedication just as much their wives love their participation in feeding their families.  But I’d prefer have to wait for the warm-up to enjoy grilling. Especially when I can make something as summer-y as Orange and Soy-Glazed St. Louis Cut Pork Ribs and a Coleslaw with the tang of an Apple and Yogurt dressing in the comfort of the kitchen. 

Monday, March 25, 2013

St. Barth's Easiest Recipe Ever....Salade des Haricots Verts avec Echalotes





       I posted this recipe last week and the response was terrific, particularly on www.sbhonline.com which is website completely given over to our favorite island.  When I did so, one of the most prolific contributors to the blog, AndyNap added something terrific to the recipe.  While I talked about using bottled Creamy Dijon Vinaigrette, AndyNap went to the trouble of giving us his recipe for the real thing: A perfect home made version.  Now I am a firm believer that home made trumps bottled in every way, so I thought I'd re-post and add AndyNap's  recipe.  It's further down the page, with the rest of the recipe. Bon Appetit!

Monday, June 18, 2012

Out of Africa: Two Marcus Samuelsson recipes: Bobotie with Mango Sambal



The Cape of Good Hope,
the very tip of Africa
         In my past life I was fortunate to travel to six continents for work.  And of all the places I’ve been, South Africa is at the top of my list for sheer physical beauty.  Being a lifelong geography fanatic, I cannot describe how exciting it was to stand at the Cape of Good Hope, the very tip of the African continent, the Atlantic on one side and the Indian Ocean on the other.  Capetown, where we were based, is a magnificent ocean front city topped off by the ever present Table Mountain. The food was not terribly memorable mostly because we were taken to restaurants that cater to European palates.  The only dish I will never forget is the national dish of South Africa, Bobotie. This wonderful aromatic mix of ground meat and tomatoes topped with a rich, creamy custard has no season.  It keeps forever in the fridge and as exotic as it sounds, you likely have every spice you need in your spice rack right now.  Add this recipe from one of the world's most fascinating cooks to your summer menu and tell everyone you're taking them to Africa for dinner. 

Thursday, May 17, 2012

Bay Burger’s Wedge Salad with Blue Cheese Dressing, Tomatoes And Red Onion.



         I frequently take part in surveys about where I eat and what I eat and when.  It goes with the territory when you write about food. Inevitably, there’s a question about how long ago I’ve visited a fast food restaurant.  I invariably answer “Never” because I gave up fast food over ten years ago.  That’s also when we ousted as much processed food from our diet as we possibly could.  While I am still not making my own Ketchup or Mayonnaise, I’ve been very successful in keeping things fresh around here.  Then how do I explain my attachment to Bay Burger, the Sag Harbor Hamburger Emporium at 1742 Bridgehampton-Sag Harbor Turnpike Sag Harbor, NY 11963 (Phone: 631.899.3915)?  In certain circles it would be classified as Fast Food faster than you can say McDonald’s.  But it isn’t. Not by a long shot.  For one thing, have you ever been to a McDonald’s that operates as a Farmer’s Market on Saturdays all winter?  Does your local McD’s have jazz nights every Thursday?  Does your fast food restaurant make its own ice cream with the fantastic tagline: “It’s from the Hamptons so you know it’s rich”?  And one summer they even made the most incredible ham sandwich. ( I do hope they bring that one back.) And how is the food there ?

Thursday, February 2, 2012

Asian Spiced Flank Steak With Basmati Rice and Mango Salad


You can serve the steak atop the salad...
Or make the salad all by itself...either way, these dishes are terrific!

         If there is a first for everything, today’s Chewing the Fat qualifies.  The first in this case was my discovery that one of my go-to heroes of the kitchen seriously let me down.  I went to his well-thumbed cookbook.  I found a chicken recipe that had a lot going for it –combining lemons and curry.  It looked relatively easy, involved a quick yogurt marinade and a simple roast in the oven.  It was awful.  A dreadful color, it took ‘tangy’ to a place I couldn’t get away from fast enough.  But lo and behold, what was under the chicken was fantastic! A wonderful rice salad with crunchy cashews, fresh mint, ripe mango and crisp haricots verts folded into fragrant basmati rice was a total winner.  So for the first time ever, I decided to share the salad with you and forget all about the chicken.  What to serve with the rice salad was a no-brainer.  I’ve collected any number of steak recipes and it seemed to me that a recipe for Asian inflected Flank Steak would be a perfect accompaniment to my hero’s terrific rice salad.

Thursday, July 7, 2011

Tuesday, July 5, 2011

Crab Louie



        While I was making this terrifically easy salad, I winced.  It was so ladies-who-lunch, I half expected to have to put on a large hat to eat it.  But it was beautiful to look at and so perfect for right now, that I realized it doesn’t have to be confined to the lunch hour.  It would be a perfect supper.  And aside from the hard-cooked eggs, it involves no cooking.  It uses great fresh produce that’s to be found everywhere at the moment.  And you could pick up everything you needed on your way home tonight.

Thursday, June 23, 2011

Coconut Shrimp Salad



Too often for my liking, I get into trouble with a recipe that’s just too much food for two people.  Try as I may, cutting back on volume isn’t always the easiest task.   Things that say they are for four people are relatively simple to divide in half.  It’s when you get to recipe for 6 or 8 servings that I start having problems.  Math was never my strong suit to begin with.  So you can imagine my intimidation when I saw this recipe from Specialty Food Magazine.  It was for 24 (8 ounce) portions.  But two things stirred me into action. The first was that I cannot get enough coconut--or shrimp for that matter.  The second is that summer is always in need of a great new salad recipe.  And this one is.
Specialty Food Magazine is hardly a regular resource for recipes for me.  Especially since its recipes are really for people who are running restaurants and, in this case apparently, take-out counters.  The 24 portions were said to have a shelf-life of 3 days.  But not wanting to set up shop or start a Coconut Shrimp stand on the street, I cut the recipe back mightily. We still had some leftovers but of a totally manageable size.  This recipe is now a respectable serving for 4 people.  And hopefully, you won’t have to worry about it shelf life since my guess is it will disappear at one sitting.
Coconut, in all its forms—as coconut water, milk, palm sugar and flakes—is very easy to find.  I got every one of them at Whole Foods.  Coconut water is now prized for its health food benefits. It’s low in carbs, 99% fat free and low in sugars.  Coconut milk on the other hand is quite caloric and I’d go with the light versions. Coconut Palm Sugar is hardly a health food but it does have a very low carb profile and it has an absolutely phenomenal taste—far deeper and more complex than brown sugar which it resembles visually.   Finally there are the coconut flakes.  Toasted, these golden brown shreds give your salad a wonderful texture.  
If you love coconut, what’s great about this dish is that the whole thing is perfumed with it and cooked with coconut at every stage.  The cooking water for the rice is the starting point.  Then there’s the coconut palm sugar in the dressing for a slight sweetness and the coconut milk which makes it creamy.  The coconut flakes in the salad give it crunch.  Finally the whole thing takes 45 minutes prep time and you can make it ahead of time thanks to that advertised 3 day shelf life.  Here’s the recipe:
Recipe for Coconut Shrimp Salad adapted from Joanna Pruess’ recipe in Specialty Food Magazine:
 1 1/2 cups coconut water

1 cups jasmine rice

¼ cup vegetable or coconut oil

16 peeled and deveined jumbo shrimp

1/2 cups peanut butter

1/4 cups coconut milk

1 freshly squeezed lime

2 tbsp. Thai fish sauce

2 tbsp coconut palm sugar

1 ounce fresh ginger, chopped

1 Jalapeno pepper, chopped, plus 1 tbsp. red chile flakes

2 cloves garlic

4 thinly sliced scallions, including most of the green parts

1 1/2 ounces chopped pistachios, plus extra to garnish
1 ounces coconut flakes, toasted, plus ½ ounce for garnish

1 cup fresh basil leaves, finely julienned, plus extra for garnish


1. Combine coconut water, rice and ¼ cup of oil in a saucepan; bring to a boil over high heat, then cover, reduce heat and simmer for 20 minutes. Remove from heat and let stand for 10 minutes. Turn into a large strainer, rinse with cold water and drain well. Transfer to a large bowl.

2. Meanwhile, cook shrimp in skillet until just done, about 2 minutes. Set aside to cool. If jumbo shrimp, cut in three pieces and add to the rice.











3. In the jar of an electric blender, combine peanut butter, coconut milk,  lime juice, Thai fish sauce, palm sugar, ginger, 1/2 chopped jalapeno, red pepper flakes and garlic; purée until smooth. With the motor running, add 1/4 cup of vegetable oil and let it emulsify.

4. Add scallions, pistachios, coconut flakes, basil leaves and the remaining jalapeno to the rice. Pour about two-thirds of the dressing over the salad and toss to blend. Add remaining dressing and additional lime juice, if desired. Transfer to a serving platter and add remaining pistachios, coconut flakes and basil leaves as garnishes. 







Monday, June 20, 2011

Roasted Asparagus with Lardons and Fried Egg Adapted from Almond Restaurant in Bridgehampton NY



        It was hard to imagine the depths of despair that a lot of people felt when, in the middle of last winter, one of our favorite restaurants abruptly closed their doors.  Not only that, but they auctioned off the contents of the place, leaving us all wondering if Almond was gone forever.

Monday, April 11, 2011

Bobby Flay’s Salmon Burgers with Hoisin Barbecue Sauce



       I like Bobby Flay.  For quite a few years, I worked above his ‘store’. That would be his highly successful Mesa Grill (102 Fifth Avenue (15-16th St), NYC  Tel: 212-807-7400). At Mesa, his take on Southwestern cuisine virtually introduced New York to the flavors of that part of the country.  Of course, along the way, he reinvented dishes left, right and center.  There were his scrumptious Blue Corn Pancakes with Barbequed Duck.   And then there was the spicy heat and sweetness of his Ancho Chile Honey Glazed Salmon.  So when I ran across Bobby’s recipe for Salmon Burgers in “The Best of the Best Cookbook Recipes” Volume 13 (Food and Wine Books, American Express Publishing Corporation 2010), I couldn’t wait to try them.

Bobby, Hands-On at one of the Palaces

        Lately, Bobby has started to build his own Burger Empire.  He has 5 Bobby’s Burger Palaces scattered around New York, New Jersey and Philadelphia.  Since they are nowhere near where I am, I cannot vouch for any of them but I do know that one my favorite burger chefs tells me Bobby’s Burgers are the real deal.  And Bobby knows enough about burgers to have written the cookbook that got him into Food and Wine’s “Best of the Best”.  It’s called   “Bobby Flay’s Burgers, Fries and Shakes” (Random House 2009) and you can buy it right here.  Oddly, however, while the book serves up the Salmon Burger recipe, Bobby’s Burger Palaces do not.  The burgers there are all Beef, Chicken and Turkey.  There’s not one seafood item on the menu. My guess is if enough people try this recipe, they’ll start asking for it next time they hit the Burger Palace. 
 
        To appreciate this dish, you really should go the whole nine yards. And please, this is a really simple recipe.  It just has a lot of ingredients.  The meaty salmon pairs beautifully with the sweetness of the hoisin sauce. And don’t leave off the spicy Asian influenced slaw.   The pickled ginger that tops it really sets it apart from ordinary cole slaw.  There’s nothing here that you can’t readily find in the Asian aisle in most supermarkets.  Hoisin itself is sometimes referred to as the ketchup of Asia.  It’s truly ubiquitous. And with the popularity of Sushi at an all time high, pickled ginger isn’t all that hard to find either.   Use your food processor to chop the fish. It makes life much simpler. Here’s the recipe: 

Recipe for Bobby Flay’s Salmon Burgers with Hoisin Sauce and Asian Slaw

For the Hoisin Barbecue Sauce:

Hoisin Barbecue Sauce Ingredients
2 tablespoons canola oil
2 large shallots, coarsely chopped
2 cloves garlic, coarsely chopped
½ cup hoisin sauce
2 tablespoons ketchup
2 tablespoons honey
2 teaspoons soy sauce
2 teaspoons fish sauce
1 tablespoon rice wine vinegar

For the Salmon Burgers
:

1 ½ pounds fresh salmon
2 tablespoons canola oil
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
4 hamburger buns, split; toasted if desired. ( I used 7 Grain buns but any hamburger bun can be pressed into service)




For the Slaw:

2 tablespoons canola oil
¼ cup thinly sliced pickled ginger, plus more for garnish (optional)
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
¼ small head of red cabbage, finely shredded
½ medium head of napa cabbage, finely shredded
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
¼ cup rice wine vinegar
2 teaspoons toasted sesame oil
3 tablespoons finely chopped fresh cilantro leaves
First, make the Hoisin Barbecue Sauce

Heat the oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat.
Add the shallots and garlic and cook until soft, about 2 minutes.
Add the hoisin, ketchup, honey, soy sauce, fish sauce, and vinegar and cook until heated through and slightly thickened, about 10 minutes.
Set aside to cool.
(The sauce can be made 1 day in advance, covered, ad refrigerated. Bring to room temperature before using.)
To make the Salmon Burgers

To form the burgers, cut the salmon into large pieces and then coarsely chop in a food processor. Do not overprocess. (Alternatively you can chop it by hand with a sharp knife.)
Divide the salmon into 4 equal portions (about 6 ounces each). Form each potion loosely into a ¾-inch-think burger and make a deep depression in the center with your thumb.
Place on a plate, cover with plastic wrap, and let chill in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes before cooking.
Meanwhile, make the slaw.
Heat the oil in a large sauté pan over high heat.
Add the ginger and garlic and cook, stirring once, until soft, about 1 minute.
Stir in the cabbage, season, with salt and pepper, and cook, stirring once, until slightly wilted, 3 to 4 minutes.
Remove from the heat and stir in the vinegar, sesame oil, and cilantro. Let sit at room temperature.
To cook the burgers, heat the oil in a sauté pan or griddle (nonstick or cast iron) until it begins to shimmer.
Season both sides of each burger with salt and pepper. Cook the burgers until golden brown on the bottom sides, about 3 minutes.
Turn over, brush with some of the hoisin barbecue sauce, and continue cooking until medium-well, about 3 minutes longer.
Place the burgers on the bun bottoms, drizzle some hoisin barbecue sauce over them, and top with the slaw.
Garnish with pickled ginger. Cover with the burger tops and serve immediately.

Serves 4