HELPING FAMILY FARMS FLOURISH. HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY.
Showing posts with label San Francisco. Show all posts
Showing posts with label San Francisco. Show all posts

Thursday, August 18, 2011

Tartine’s Fruit Galettes with thanks to Elisabeth Prueitt and Chad Robertson of Tartine Bakery, San Francisco




If ever there was a moment for making these free-form rustic pastries, it’s right now.  The markets are bursting at the seams with the most beautiful stone fruits and berries of every description.  The peaches, nectarines and cherries are irresistible and this recipe is a perfect way to use them paired with blueberries. Last weekend we had very special guests, our friend Julie and her 10-year old daughter and budding pastry chef, Lucy.

Friday, February 11, 2011

Almond Crusted Chicken Breasts




        Last winter, at a Food Writer’s boot camp, I met a woman named Leitha who was contemplating writing a blog devoted entirely to boneless, skinless chicken breasts.  After a very preliminary discussion with her boyfriend, she abandoned the project.  Apparently he told her point blank that she would be eating alone most of the time if she went forward.  More recently, I read an entire rant on the subject of how breasts and their white meat are among the most reviled ingredients of restaurant chefs.  Writing for Time magazine, Josh Ozersky stated: “I'm going to be the one to say what nearly every person in the culinary world thinks: We all hate chicken breasts. Hate them. I speak for every chef, food writer and butcher in America here. There's not one of us that has the slightest interest or respect for the chicken breast, at least compared with the dark meat. It might as well be a McNugget."*

Thursday, January 6, 2011

Cioppino, the San Francisco treat


        My mother adored Cioppino, the fish stew with its roots in the North Beach neighborhood of San Francisco dating back to before the earthquake.  If you knew my mother, or for that matter, read this blog, you know that cooking was not Mother’s thing.  But if it were an easy recipe, one requiring as little time and attention as possible, and one that could reasonably be cooked in as few steps as possible, my Mother would latch onto it with an almost religious fervor.  So it was with Cioppino.  There is very little opportunity to make a bad Cioppino because it is probably the most flexible fish stew on the planet.  And it packs a wonderful punch of flavor in every bite.  The Cioppino I am sharing with you today tasted of the sea itself.  And then there was the richness of the tomatoes, the anise flavor of the fennel, and the bite-sized pieces of seafood brightened with a dash of fresh lemon juice.  Mother was right.  It’s hard to beat a great Cioppino.