HELPING FAMILY FARMS FLOURISH. HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY.
Showing posts with label Savory Pies. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Savory Pies. Show all posts

Thursday, January 9, 2014

Toad in the Hole, British Comfort Food at its best.

        
Bangers and Mash
I have a weakness for English dishes with picturesque names. Even the simplest of these is a riddle.  “Bangers and Mash”, or Sausage and Mashed Potatoes, is the simplest to understand.  The sausages used in the original recipe, which first came on the scene during World War I when times were tough, were so full of water that they sometimes exploded (Bang!) when they met the heat of the pan.  Other dishes are even
Bubble and Squeak
less descriptive.  “Bubble and Squeak”, a fried patty, is made with leftover vegetables that accompanied the Sunday Roast. It could likely form the basis of an interesting guessing game at the dinner table.   “Angels on Horseback” is completely oblique.  It’s an appetizer or savory dish that followed the main course at a formal British dinner. "Angels" are oysters, or sometimes scallops, wrapped in bacon, "Horseback". Try as I did to
Angels on Horseback
find out how on earth this name came about, I was stymied.  One British food historian simply gave up and suggested that the dish was actually French and called "Anges en Cheval". This might be the first occurence ever of the British conceding anything to the French. "Angels" are 
close cousins of “Devils on Horseback” in which dried fruit replaces the oyster.  Both “Angels” and “Devils” have made it to
Devils on Horseback 
North America even if their names have not.   Then we come to "Toad in the Hole”.  It may be the oldest of all these dishes and to me, it’s one of the most delicious.  It has no pretensions: It’s an inexpensive one-dish comfort food that makes a great one plate dinner.  And what exactly is “Toad in the Hole” ?
       

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Savory Roasted Tomato Tarte Tatin


         I recently came across a very detailed recipe for a tomato Tarte Tatin in August’s Bon Appetit.  Now I used to make Tarte Tatins at every opportunity.  They were hard to beat: You put butter and sugar into a cast iron pan and it magically turned into caramel.  You added pears or apples skin side down, covered the thing with pastry and into the oven it went.  Once done, you cautiously fiipped the tart over and voila!  Your pretty pears or apples glistened on a bed of pastry.  Add a scoop of ice cream and you had a dessert that even I could make.  This was of course before Andrew took up baking. Now, if I made dessert, people would be convinced that I’d lost my mind.  But I couldn’t get the Tomato Tarte Tatin out of my mind. 

Thursday, April 18, 2013

White Chicken Pot Pie inspired by Melissa Clark in The New York Times



        
It’s awfully close to putting-away-the-pot-pie-recipes time.  But this one is so good, I hope it gets in under the wire and if not, do save it for a rainy day.  It’s that good.  The reason I rushed to make it was that I’d managed to end up with not one but two half-eaten rotisserie chickens. They’re perfect for a recipe calling for cooked chicken. In fact, they eliminate a whole step.  They are a stand-in for poached boneless, skinless chicken breasts so they cut cooking time down. While you don’t end up with the poaching liquid called for in the original recipe, Chicken Broth is a perfectly suitable substitution.
        
Dahlia and Melissa in the Kitchen
The genesis for this recipe was an article Melissa Clark wrote about the ‘white food’ diet her 4 year old daughter Dahlia rigidly clings to.  Dahlia likes carb-laden dishes like Mac and Cheese and this Chicken Pot Pie, which would be relentlessly white were it not for an optional cup of peas.  I latched onto the peas to make some gesture to Spring’s arrival.   Now Dahlia is not the first person to embrace white food.

Sunday, September 9, 2012

Daniel Boulud's Corn and Heirloom Tomato Tart



The Decor of Maison Boulud gets high marks too!

       Daniel Boulud is no stranger to these pages.  His recipes are as reliable as his restaurants, the latest of which just opened in Montreal’s newly renovated Ritz Carlton Hotel ( 1228 Sherbrooke St. Ouest, Montreal QC H3g 1H6 Tel: 514-842-4212 ) The place only opened at the end of May and there are currently 166 reviews of it on Open Table alone!  Almost all of them assign “Maison Boulud” 5 stars.  Since my parents spent years and years going to that same Ritz at every opportunity, I have great affection for the hotel.  It came as no real surprise that Chef Boulud has made magic there.  I just wish I could whip up and sample what is taking the town by storm.  However, I will have to content myself with his recipe made with food from closer to home.  In fact, the two mainstays of this dish came straight from the farm that’s right over the hill from our house.  And what a dish it is!  The burst of tomato flavor, the sweetness of the corn and the fluffiest of pastry crusts are a wonderful salute to the end of summer.  We’d give this one 5 stars and name the recipe one of our best finds this summer.

Monday, November 8, 2010

Pork and Poblano Tamale Pie




        "The Joy of Cooking" was one of the first cookbooks I was ever aware of.  


It, along with Boston Cooking School Cookbook (aka Fanny


Farmer), the enormous Gourmet Cookbooks Volumes 1 and 2, and something called “The 

Encyclopedia of Canadian Cooking” (yes, Encyclopedia) formed


the backbone of my family’s cookbook library.  Aside from


those Junior League recipe collections, which inevitably


involved cans of Campbell’s Cream of Something 


soups,  that was about it.  But one recipe from "Joy" remained


in my mind.  It was the notorious recipe for Tamale Pie.