HELPING FAMILY FARMS FLOURISH. HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY.
Showing posts with label Shrimp. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Shrimp. Show all posts

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

Shrimp, Corn and Avocado Quesadillas and Ina Garten's recipe for Roasted Shrimp


         I got a big kick out of this recipe when I initially made it.  It calls for ‘leftover shrimp’.  Does anyone actually ever have leftover shrimp? If anything, when you serve these addictive little two-bite appetizers, you are more likely to have anything other than a tail leftover.  Then I proved myself wrong because I did in fact have some beautiful roasted shrimp left over.  I made them using Ina Garten’s superb recipe.  Roasting shrimp makes infinite good sense.  When you boil shrimp, you’re basically boiling out the flavor, all of which will be absorbed by the water they’re boiled in.  Roast shrimp and you’re roasting the flavor into the shrimp.  I can almost guarantee you will never boil another shrimp once you’ve tried Ina’s recipe which comes right after the one for Quesadillas. 

Tuesday, December 24, 2013

Shrimp Scampi, an amazingly fast Italian American Classic and the story of the Feast of the 7 Fishes.


        
Scampi
The other night, in the run up to Christmas, I wanted to cook something that would take no time at all to prepare.  I had some 20-25 count Shrimp and started poking around for a recipe that had not appeared on Chewing the Fat.  Since there have been no less that 41 shrimp recipes published here, it amazed me to discover that the Italian American restaurant classic, Shrimp Scampi, had never made an appearance here.  How clearly I remember Scampi from my first forays into an Italian restaurant in Montreal.  The overtly garlic-y, buttery sauce was a sensation—especially if you teamed it up with crusty bread to soak up the sauce.  Later, when I went to school in Italy and learned the language, I was surprised to hear that ‘Shrimp Scampi’ is rather like calling something Chicken Poulet.  Scampi is the ingredient “langoustines” -- an Italian version of shrimp.  But this dish itself is pure Italian American cooking, plain and simple and incredibly easy to make.  I was astonished that the whole thing took under ten minutes to make. In fact, it’s so speedy, you feel like a one-armed paper hanger juggling the cooking of the shrimp, with the 3 minutes it takes the angel hair pasta to cook.  But this is a winner from start to finish and before the feasting begins tomorrow, it’s a perfect thing to serve the night before the night before Christmas.  Except, perhaps, if you’re Italian, because your Christmas Eve Feast will satisfy your hunger for seafood for quite a while.   I’ll take you through the Scampi recipe after introducing you to The Feast of the 7 Fishes.

Thursday, August 22, 2013

Two Salads adapted from Ina Garten: Roasted Shrimp and Orzo and Beets with Orange Vinaigrette





         Recipes that other cooks invent should be treated with great respect.  I’ve mentioned before that few things put me off more than someone commenting on a dish—very often negatively—that they have ‘doctored’ beyond recognition.   Still, if you do delve into the comments, you can certainly learn something and sometimes there’s a certain universality of opinion that is worth paying attention to.  In the case of today’s offerings, I didn’t make a single change to Ina Garten’s Beets with Orange Vinaigrette.  It’s a winner just as it is.  But when I got to Roasted Shrimp with Orzo, two things made me alter the original and, if I may be so bold, they were spectacular changes.

Monday, May 20, 2013

Mu Shu in Moments from Gourmet Magazine


Ready to be folded, Mu Shu in a Moment!


        
Restaurant General Tso's Chicken
the good, the bad and the ugly.
In our bid to eat healthy, Chinese food has taken quite a hit. We never order it for takeout.  And our visits to Chinese restaurants are few and far between.  But take heart.  We have discovered how easy it is to make Chinese food at home.  Not only does this keep the exotic flavors on our table from time to time, it also solves a lot of the issues we’ve had with the food to begin with.  Despite last week's news that salt might not be all that bad for you, Chinese cooking packs extraordinary levels of the stuff.  The current recommended daily intake of sodium is 2300 mgs. Or about a teaspoon.  A restaurant serving of General Tso’s chicken comes in at 3200 mgs. And, at 1300, more than half the calories that an adult is supposed to consume all day (2000).  That’s before you added an egg roll, which will send the sodium count up another 400 mgs. and the calorie count up another 200.  So much for the General's chicken. But surely Chinese vegetables are healthy?  Not so fast.  A plate of stir-fried greens comes in at 900 calories, eggplant in garlic sauce, 1000.  Then there’s MSG, monosodium glutamate, which has had a bad rap since the 60s when it was associated with “headaches, flushing, sweating, numbness, chest pain, nausea, heart palpitations, and weakness” according to Yale Scientific (www.YaleScientific.org). It was even called “Chinese Restaurant Syndrome”.  However, according to YS, “researchers have not found any conclusive evidence that links MSG to any of these symptoms, though it is acknowledged that a small minority of people may have mild, short-term reactions to MSG.”  So there!

Thursday, April 25, 2013

Vietnamese Shrimp Sliders adapted from Melissa Clark in The New York Times


         

I don't know when sliders took over the world but they're everywhere. And while they may have started out as mini-hamburgers, now you can find them on all kinds of menus, stuffed with everything from Turkey to Texas barbecue.  Let's face it, their size is ideal.  In one or two bites, you get the full-on slider experience.  They're just the right size for children, for whom a full-sized burger is a challenge.  In today's post, they're made with crispy fried shrimp dipped into a salty lime sauce and then tucked into tiny brioche buns that have been slathered with an Asian inflected mayonaise. They're a gift from the inventive Melissa Clark whose Wednesday food column in the New York Times is eagerly awaited in our house. This time, Melissa has gone East for her flavors.

Monday, February 11, 2013

Cajun Spiced Shrimp over Cheese Grits and Bacon


  
         Grits are about as southern as my Aunt Charlotte. She hailed from Huntsville, Alabama and yet never lost a syllable of her Southern accent despite living in Canada for decades.  But for all her southernism, Aunt Charlotte never introduced us to grits. That happy event took place in the Hamptons and only quite recently. I am tempted to say grits were the glue of a New Year’s Day Brunch our friend David gives every year.  But using glue and grits in the same sentence just reinforces an old stereotype: that grits are more akin to wallpaper paste than to anything good to eat.  That is simply not true.  Good grits are smooth and creamy.  Grits are high in iron, extremely low in fat and have no cholesterol at all.  That can’t be said of what grits are flavored with.  Everything from butter to cheese, from bacon to gravy and country ham have found their way into warm bowls of grits.   They not only raise the fat count, these additions do terrific things for the flavor.  Unfortunately, I found this out the hard way:  My first bowl of grits was about as tasty as, well, wallpaper paste.  They were nothing like David’s.  So I set out to see if I could break the taste barrier with my next foray into grits.  And I am pleased to say, today’s recipe broke the bank. Creamy, cheddar-y grits, flecked with bits of crisp bacon were topped with Cajun-spiced Shrimp, shallots and parsley.  As my friend Judith would say they’re like ‘wrapping your mouth around a bite of the south.’

Monday, December 3, 2012

Crystal Shrimp with Ginger, Sweet Peas and Scallions



         No matter how gray a day it’s been, coming home to a dinner of beautifully pink and gold shrimp paired with sweet peas, fresh scallions and ginger medallions is a visual treat.  The simple salting and rinsing of the raw shrimp gives them a firm texture.  This recipe, which first appeared in Bon Appetit five years ago, gives credit for the name of the dish to the crystal-like texture of the shrimp. I would also have to say that there is a crystal look to the shrimp as well.  There’s not a lot of prep time involved in this recipe however it does require a 1 to 3 hour rest period for the shrimp once they’ve been battered with cornstarch and egg white.  While that was going on, I took a look at the history of the Shrimp and another look at where mine come from, that marvel of food shopping, Costco.

Marco Polo 
         In a kind of believe it or not, the shrimp’s name is derived from a Middle English word ‘shrimpe’ which meant ‘pygmy’.  This of course could lead to an entire discussion on the dichotomy of the words “Jumbo Shrimp” and doesn’t really give a satisfying answer to why someone would pick up a shrimp and think “Pygmy!”   Putting that aside, shrimp has been around for a very long time.  The Chinese were eating shrimp in the 7th century.  And when Marco Polo arrived in China in 1280, he commented on their abundance in food markets.  This country, however, has long held the record for shrimp eating.  In the 17th  century, Louisiana’s bayou residents were hauling in shrimp in giant seines that were up to 600 feet in circumference!  And there were no mechanical devices involved at all – just human labor.  It wasn’t until 1917 that mechanized shrimping arrived.  And with it came some unfortunate side effects.

Monday, August 27, 2012

Spaghettini with Shrimp, Tomatoes and Chile Crumbs From Chef Dan Kluger of ABC Kitchen



Dan Kluger and his boss,
Jean-Georges Vongerichten
in the ABC Kitchen
         In July, Food & Wine magazine announced its picks in its annual “Best New Chefs” issue.  And it came as no surprise to us at all that the magazine had selected Chef Dan Kluger as one of the twelve.  If you’ve been lucky enough to snag a table at ABC Kitchen in the Manhattan store of the same name, you’ve experienced why.  The fresh flavors and unique spins on old favorites like Eggs Benedict have seduced us.  We’ll take a seat at the always-packed bar any chance we get.  The restaurant at 35 East 18th Street (Tel: 212-475-5829) is just two blocks north of the Union Square Greenmarket, the largest and arguably best Farmer’s Market in all of New York.  In fact, Chef Kluger met the man behind ABC Kitchen at the Market.  You may have heard of him: Jean-Georges Vongerichten.  According to the chef, the pair bonded at a stand called “Berried Treasures” and before he knew it, Chef Kluger had a new job heading up Jean-George’s Farm to Table Restaurant in the ABC store. 

Monday, April 9, 2012

Eric Ripert’s Shrimp in Coconut Curry Sauce with Caribbean Fried Rice

Chef Ripert with the Sting Rays the Caymans are famous for
         I’ve mentioned my fondness for Eric Ripert on these pages before.  He’s one chef whose recipes really translate for the home cook.  His flavors are bright and inventive and nothing shows this off better than these two delicious dishes.  Since we’re barely off the plane from the Caribbean, I couldn’t resist extending our stay by making them for a weeknight dinner last week.  I am not going to say that these are ten minute mains.  There’s a fair amount of slicing, chopping and dicing involved in both.  But the end certainly justifies the means and just look how at how gorgeous your dinner plate will look.

Thursday, December 15, 2011

Ina Garten's Roasted Shrimp Cocktail with Spicy Cocktail Sauce

Flowers from the fabulous
Bridgehampton Florist..where else?

These shrimp are the center of attention on our Holiday Open House Buffett.

Ina Garten is a goddess around here. She lives in the next town over and has for years and years. Before becoming the TV star and author, she had a local food shop and catering service which endeared her to hundreds of customers. Now, with seven indispensable cookbooks in print, she’s endeared herself to millions. Much to her chagrin, because she likes to be able to walk around town and in and out of shops without causing a riot, there’s a cottage industry that’s sprung up involving Fans who come to the East End on self-guided “Ina tours” many of which wind up in our dear friends Michael and Jimmy’s shop, the Bridgehampton Florist. As frequent guests on Ina’s TV show, Michael and Jim are celebrities to these visitors. Personally, I get it. Ina is a sensational teacher and advocate of simple, wonderful food. And from her cookbook “Barefoot Contessa Back to Basics” comes her recipe for Roasted Shrimp Cocktail. To me, that alone should put her on a pedestal.

Monday, August 15, 2011

Sauteed Shrimp with Coconut Oil, Ginger and Coriander with Confetti Corn adapted from Ina Garten


         Last weekend, we had close friends staying with us and this dinner really hit the spot.  It took no time at all to put together. In fact the whole thing took about 30 minutes.  The delicious and mildly coconut-flavored shrimp cooked took about 10 minutes and the only time-consuming thing about the Confetti corn was getting it off the cob.

Thursday, June 23, 2011

Coconut Shrimp Salad



Too often for my liking, I get into trouble with a recipe that’s just too much food for two people.  Try as I may, cutting back on volume isn’t always the easiest task.   Things that say they are for four people are relatively simple to divide in half.  It’s when you get to recipe for 6 or 8 servings that I start having problems.  Math was never my strong suit to begin with.  So you can imagine my intimidation when I saw this recipe from Specialty Food Magazine.  It was for 24 (8 ounce) portions.  But two things stirred me into action. The first was that I cannot get enough coconut--or shrimp for that matter.  The second is that summer is always in need of a great new salad recipe.  And this one is.
Specialty Food Magazine is hardly a regular resource for recipes for me.  Especially since its recipes are really for people who are running restaurants and, in this case apparently, take-out counters.  The 24 portions were said to have a shelf-life of 3 days.  But not wanting to set up shop or start a Coconut Shrimp stand on the street, I cut the recipe back mightily. We still had some leftovers but of a totally manageable size.  This recipe is now a respectable serving for 4 people.  And hopefully, you won’t have to worry about it shelf life since my guess is it will disappear at one sitting.
Coconut, in all its forms—as coconut water, milk, palm sugar and flakes—is very easy to find.  I got every one of them at Whole Foods.  Coconut water is now prized for its health food benefits. It’s low in carbs, 99% fat free and low in sugars.  Coconut milk on the other hand is quite caloric and I’d go with the light versions. Coconut Palm Sugar is hardly a health food but it does have a very low carb profile and it has an absolutely phenomenal taste—far deeper and more complex than brown sugar which it resembles visually.   Finally there are the coconut flakes.  Toasted, these golden brown shreds give your salad a wonderful texture.  
If you love coconut, what’s great about this dish is that the whole thing is perfumed with it and cooked with coconut at every stage.  The cooking water for the rice is the starting point.  Then there’s the coconut palm sugar in the dressing for a slight sweetness and the coconut milk which makes it creamy.  The coconut flakes in the salad give it crunch.  Finally the whole thing takes 45 minutes prep time and you can make it ahead of time thanks to that advertised 3 day shelf life.  Here’s the recipe:
Recipe for Coconut Shrimp Salad adapted from Joanna Pruess’ recipe in Specialty Food Magazine:
 1 1/2 cups coconut water

1 cups jasmine rice

¼ cup vegetable or coconut oil

16 peeled and deveined jumbo shrimp

1/2 cups peanut butter

1/4 cups coconut milk

1 freshly squeezed lime

2 tbsp. Thai fish sauce

2 tbsp coconut palm sugar

1 ounce fresh ginger, chopped

1 Jalapeno pepper, chopped, plus 1 tbsp. red chile flakes

2 cloves garlic

4 thinly sliced scallions, including most of the green parts

1 1/2 ounces chopped pistachios, plus extra to garnish
1 ounces coconut flakes, toasted, plus ½ ounce for garnish

1 cup fresh basil leaves, finely julienned, plus extra for garnish


1. Combine coconut water, rice and ¼ cup of oil in a saucepan; bring to a boil over high heat, then cover, reduce heat and simmer for 20 minutes. Remove from heat and let stand for 10 minutes. Turn into a large strainer, rinse with cold water and drain well. Transfer to a large bowl.

2. Meanwhile, cook shrimp in skillet until just done, about 2 minutes. Set aside to cool. If jumbo shrimp, cut in three pieces and add to the rice.











3. In the jar of an electric blender, combine peanut butter, coconut milk,  lime juice, Thai fish sauce, palm sugar, ginger, 1/2 chopped jalapeno, red pepper flakes and garlic; purée until smooth. With the motor running, add 1/4 cup of vegetable oil and let it emulsify.

4. Add scallions, pistachios, coconut flakes, basil leaves and the remaining jalapeno to the rice. Pour about two-thirds of the dressing over the salad and toss to blend. Add remaining dressing and additional lime juice, if desired. Transfer to a serving platter and add remaining pistachios, coconut flakes and basil leaves as garnishes. 







Thursday, May 26, 2011

Shrimp and Sausage Jambalaya



In the pantheon of one dish wonders, it’s hard to beat a great Jambalaya, another of Louisiana’s culinary gifts to the rest of the world.  It is said that the first Jambalaya came out of the French Quarter.  It was an attempt to cook Paella, with whom it shares many ingredients.  But absent the saffron Paella requires, tomatoes were used as a stand-in.  There are two kinds of Jambalaya—Creole and Cajun.  This recipe has lots of tomato in it and so qualifies as Creole.  Cajuns refer to this version as red Jambalaya.   Aside from the tomatoes, the major difference is that Cajun or brown Jambalaya is more smoky and spicy. 
The all essential 'holy trinity'
There’s almost nothing that you can’t put into Jambalaya.  Chicken and sausage are followed by vegetables and rice and finally with seafood in the Creole Version. The Cajuns, living as they did in swamp country where crawfish, shrimp, alligator, duck, turtle, boar, venison and other game were readily available used these meats in many combinations.  But they eschewed tomatoes altogether.  Both versions start with ‘the holy trinity’ of Louisiana cooking: Onions, Bell Peppers and Celery.  Although no one is quite sure where the name Jambalaya came from it’s been popular in good times and in bad because of its ‘throw everything into the pot’ composition.
This version, which first appeared in Coastal Living magazine, is very easy to make and takes less time than you’d think—about 20 minutes to prep and 40 minutes to cook.  It is greatly helped along by the use of cooked long grain rice.  (Original recipes cooked everything but the rice and the seafood for about an hour when the rice was added for the another 30 minutes and the seafood for the last five.)  I confess to cheating on the rice.  I couldn’t see cooking rice separately so I went to a local Chinese restaurant where I bought a pint container of steamed rice.  For $1.36, it seemed like a small price to pay for some labor saved.  Even though this is a Creole version, I went a little Cajun.  I upped the spice quotient with some McIlhenny Tabasco sauce.  The McIlhennys has been making the sauce on Avery Island, Louisiana  since 1868 where it still owned and operated by the same family.  You can’t get much more authentic than that.  Here’s the recipe:
Recipe for Shrimp and Sausage Jambalaya adapted from Coastal Living Magazine. 
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
12 ounces Andouille or other spicy smoked sausage, sliced (I used Andouille Chicken sausage to cut calories without cutting flavor)
1 large onion, diced
1 bell pepper, diced
3 celery ribs, chopped
4 garlic cloves, minced
2 bay leaves
1 teaspoon dried thyme
1 teaspoon dried oregano
2 teaspoons Creole seasoning
1 (14-ounce) can diced tomatoes, with juice
3 cups chicken broth
2 cups cooked long-grain rice
6-8  shrimp, peeled and deveined
4 green onions, chopped
McIlhnney's Tabasco Sauce to taste

1. Heat oil in a Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add sausage, and cook, stirring constantly, 5 minutes or until lightly browned. Remove sausage with a slotted spoon; set aside.   
  2. Add onion and next 7 ingredients to hot drippings in Dutch oven; sauté 5         minutes or until vegetables are tender. Stir in reserved sausage, tomatoes, broth, and rice. Bring mixture to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer, covered, 25 minutes or until rice is tender.




. 3. Stir in shrimp; cover and cook 5 minutes or until done. Check for seasoning and add McIlhenny's Tabasco Sauce, salt and pepper to taste.  Put into bowls and sprinkle each serving with green onions.

Tuesday, May 10, 2011

Linguine with Lemon-Garlic Shrimp


  
        I’ve yet to find a recipe that comes close to the Shrimp Scampi that I grew up with. It was a dish that was so resolutely garlic-y, you could smell it coming up the driveway.  Later, when I lived in Italy, I found out how off that name is.  Scampi is a shellfish, a langoustine more formally known as Nephrops Norvegicus, or Norway Lobster found in the North Atlantic and parts of the Mediterranean.  In both taste and texture it has more in common with lobster and crayfish than shrimp or prawns. And the pasta dish we loved at home didn’t contain any Nephrops Norvegicus.  It was made with jumbo shrimp, wine, and the aforementioned tons of garlic.  So what’s with the Shrimp Scampi?  It’s almost like calling a dish “Chicken Poulet.”
Nephrops Norvegicus
“Scampi" is often the menu name for shrimp in Italian-American cuisine.  The actual word for "shrimp" in Italian is gambero or gamberetto. The term “Scampi” is used as the name of a dish of shrimp served in garlic butter and dry white wine, served either with bread, or over pasta or rice. The word "scampi" is often construed as that style of preparation rather than an ingredient, with that preparation being called "shrimp scampi", and with variants such as "chicken scampi". 
Now this recipe for Linguine with Lemon-Garlic Shrimp comes from Fine Cooking.  It's one of their series of really simple and fast dinner recipes.  Its name wisely eliminates the redundancy of “Shrimp Scampi”.  However it gets very close to what I loved as a child.   It’s deeply perfumed with garlic and lemon.  Then there’s an addition that flies in the face of the Italian edict: Never add cheese to seafood of any kind. In this case, Marscapone, that luxurious Italian cream cheese is added at the end to give the sauce a creamy richness.  Somewhat bizarrely the original recipe is for three people.  I made it for two by cutting down on the number of shrimp.   I would however caution against cutting the amount of sauce down.  And this is one time when you really do need to add a little of the paste water to get your sauce to the perfect consistency.   Here is the recipe:

Recipe for Linguine with Lemon-Garlic Shrimp
Kosher salt
1/2 lb. dried thin linguine
1 lemon
1 lb. extra-large (26 to 30 per pound) shrimp, peeled and deveined
Freshly ground black pepper
2 Tbs. unsalted butter
3 medium cloves garlic, thinly sliced (1 Tbs.)
1/8 to 1/4 tsp. crushed red pepper flakes
1/4 cup dry white wine, such as Pinot Grigio
1/2 cup mascarpone cheese
2 Tbs. thinly sliced chives 

Bring a large pot of well-salted water to a boil over high heat. Cook the linguine in the boiling water according to package directions until al dente. Reserve about 3/4 cup of the cooking water and then drain the pasta.

Meanwhile, finely grate 1-1/4 tsp. of zest from the lemon and squeeze 2 Tbs. of juice. Toss the shrimp with 1/2 tsp. of the zest and 1/4 tsp. each salt and pepper.

In a 12-inch skillet, melt the butter over medium-high heat until the foam subsides. Add the garlic and red pepper flakes and cook until the garlic just begins to brown, about 1 minute. Add the shrimp and cook until just opaque, about 3 minutes. Add the wine and lemon juice, bring to a boil, and cook until slightly reduced, 1 minute.

Add the drained pasta, mascarpone, and 1/2 cup of the cooking water. Toss well, adding more cooking water as needed, until the pasta and shrimp are coated and the sauce looks creamy. Remove from the heat. Toss in the remaining 3/4 tsp. lemon zest and the chives. Season to taste with salt and pepper and serve.


Thursday, July 1, 2010

Chop Chop Salad with Gingered Shrimp and with thanks to Daniel Boulud



Who doesn’t love Daniel Boulud?  His restaurants are on everyone’s New York Top 10 list from Daniel to his latest DBGB on the Bowery, of all places.    I have particular soft spot for his Bar Boulud, across from Lincoln Center and very close to home.  It was there that my daughter-in-law told us that I was going to be a grandfather for the first time.  And the food is pretty good as well!   I’m told Daniel is a very fine fellow and wonderful to work with. I follow him religiously in Elle Décor
magazine where he is the lead food writer.   I’m never disappointed in what he publishes there.   This salad is a wonderful example.  It’s an homage to DBGB’s close proximity to Chinatown, with a wonderful Asian influenced dressing and an Asian marinade for the shrimp. And with the 4th of July upon us, this will be a fantastic addition to the holiday weekend.


Wednesday, May 12, 2010

Vietnamese Shrimp and Pork Belly with Sweet and Spicy Sauce





Ever since my last trip to Hong Kong, where, on our last night there, we went to a Vietnamese Restaurant called “Pho Lemon” (25 Elgin St. Central, TEL: 2523-8272) I have wanted to cook Vietnamese food.  There’s likely nowhere on earth where you can find such a confluence of Asian cuisine as there is in Hong Kong.  During my last trip there, we’d eaten Japanese, Korean, Malaysian and of course, Chinese food from Hunanese to Cantonese.  Fantastic food in some of the finest places in the city.   So when, on that particular night, I had a roast chicken that was one of the finest I had ever eaten, I was determined to learn how to cook it. 


Friday, April 30, 2010

Olive Oil Poached Shrimp with Ginger-Tomato Sauce and Avocado and Carrot Salad



        I am always on the lookout not just for recipes but for cooking techniques to share.  I thought we had shrimp completely under control with Ina Garten’s Roasted Shrimp recipe.  The oven roasted results beat any boiled shrimp we’d ever tasted.  We’ll never make shrimp cocktail any other way. 

But here’s a recipe that uses Olive Oil as a poaching liquid and turns out the most tender, beautifully cooked creatures and, if you time them precisely, in 25 minutes you have absolutely exquisite shrimp.   And no, they are not the least bit ‘oily’.  That’s really the only downside to the recipe.  You need at least 17 ounces of the stuff or enough to fill a sauté pan with an inch of oil.  But after I finished, I strained what I’d used, put it back in its bottle and into the refrigerator for re-use.  And, like those ancient commercials for Crisco Oil, I was amazed at how little of the oil had been absorbed.  I had very close to the full bottle I started out with.  

Please don’t use your best Olive Oil for this dish.  You don’t really have to use Extra Virgin.  Just a good bottle of standard olive oil will do.  The sauce is wonderful too.  I served it with a simple Carrot and Avocado Salad.  With the pink shrimp, red ginger-tomato sauce, there was a lot of beautiful color on our dinner table. 

Monday, March 22, 2010

Pasta alla Puttanesca with (or without) Shrimp



I am making a concerted effort to put some great vegetarian recipes together for all kinds of reasons—health, being eco-friendly and just giving us all more options for terrific meals. Recently, a fellow member of my Food Writer’s Boot Camp went to a lot of trouble to send me a great vegetarian main dish which I am working on sharing with you soon.  But it the meantime, this recipe, which came out of the February/March “Fine Cooking”, is a fantastic discovery.  You can satisfy your vegetarian eaters and/or you can take it to another level by adding some shrimp in the last few minutes.  So one dish can be served two ways—at the same seating.  It’s perfect for families where increasingly there’s a vegetarian at the table. 

Monday, November 9, 2009

Review of Fatty Crab and a recipe for a one-dish wonder called Nasi Goreng with Shrimp





I can’t get enough of Fatty Crab www.fattycrab.com  2170Broadway (76th-77th St.)212-496-2722 for reservations or http://www.opentable.com/), the spinoff of the original West Village restaurant (634 Hudson Street, between Horatio and Gansevoort Sts., 212 352-3592 (No reservations taken).

Now that it’s made the trek north to the Upper West Side, it’s become one of our two favorite Asian restaurants. It’s a funky place born of owner Zak Pelaccio’s love affair with Malaysian cooking following a stint cooking and eating in Kuala Lumpur.