HELPING FAMILY FARMS FLOURISH. HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY.
Showing posts with label Soups. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Soups. Show all posts

Monday, December 2, 2013

Spicy (Rotisserie) Chicken Soup from Bon Appetit



         Let’s face it: this time of year begs for recipes that you can get on the table in no time. This wonderful soup takes all of 15 minutes to make and it’s a perfect warmer for a winter night.  With a tossed green salad and some crusty French bread, it’s an ideal supper any day of the week.  Leave out the bread, and it's a gluten-free dinner!  The timesaver here is, of course, the rotisserie chicken.  I find the ones at Costco irresistible.  At under $5.00, they’re a bargain that’s as tasty as any home made chicken.  And there’s a lot of meat on these birds—so much so that you may find the quantity of chicken in the original Bon Appetit recipe, 4 cups, is happily met by using just the breasts.  The rest of the chicken can sit in the fridge and used for chicken sandwiches for lunch.  You can use any kind of mushrooms but shiitakes and creminis will up the flavor more than white button mushrooms.  The ginger slices ramp up the taste. If you’re not mad for spice, keep tasting as you add the cayenne pepper, it’s what gives the soup its name.  A word to the wise about the spinach:  Put a half cup of baby spinach leaves in the bottom of each soup bowl and pour the hot soup over it.  It will cook right up in the bowl and add a jolt of green to the proceedings.  Here’s the recipe:

Monday, November 18, 2013

Two from One: Roasted Cauliflower with Whipped Goat Cheese and Roasted Cauliflower Soup




        

On a recent “Chopped”, the Food Network TV show that pits four chefs against a basket full of incongruous ingredients, a very sad fact was served up to the audience.  Americans throw away 40 percent of the food they buy!  The dollar amount is staggering:  According to Reuters, $165 billion worth or 90 billion pounds of food goes un-eaten. Apparently in this land of plenty, where millions of people are on government food programs and where a staggering 14 percent of children go to bed hungry, there are equal numbers who throw food away with abandon.  And I can’t say that in our house we’re completely guilt-free.  A recent refrigerator clean-out included a few half chopped onions, some very wilted carrots and lots of unidentified liquids and solids making penicillin in plastic food containers.  I am not about to offer excuses.  I grew up having “Waste Not, Want Not” etched into memory.  But the plain fact is that a lot of the recipes I work with are for more than just two people.  Andrew will very often ask “So how many people are coming to dinner?”.  Most of the time I can cut things back to a reasonable portion for two.  But there are ingredients that just don’t divvy up.  Take, for example, a head of Cauliflower.   It’s one of the last of the year’s fresh vegetables. Arrayed at the farm stand with its white center peeking out from its green housing, I find it irresistible.  This year, I was determined to cook one but not force us into involuntary vegetarianism.  The solution: make two dishes out of one head.  It turned out that one night’s meatless meal was another day’s creamed soup for lunch. 

Thursday, March 21, 2013

Irish Onion Soup from James Klucharit of ABV Restaurant, NYC, Courtesy of Tasting Table


         If you don’t subscribe to Tasting Table (www.TastingTable.com), you’re missing out.  The site is just over 4 years old but in that time, it’s gone from 50 readers a day to editions that cover New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Washington DC and Chicago and attract thousands of readers.  Local  editors are selected for their expertise in each city.  They have ‘tested, tasted, sipped or supped on’ whatever item is featured that day.  This year, in partnership with Williams-Sonoma, there’s a once a week feature that alone is worth signing up for. It's the Sous Chef Series.  It features some of the city’s hardest working chefs—they’re all sous chefs at prominent local restaurants and they get their turn to shine every Monday.  Visitors to Tasting Table meet the chefs, see what’s behind the scenes at their restaurants and are treated to one of the Sous Chefs own recipes. Not long ago, they featured a young chef called James Klucharit. 

Thursday, February 21, 2013

Ina Garten's Italian Wedding Soup and her recipe for Chicken Stock



         Winter weekends are just made for hearty soups, especially on those days when you are dodging snowflakes or stuck indoors because the weather’s just too cold.  So when I found myself shut in during the Great Blizzard of ’13, I pulled out the cookbooks on the hunt for a great soup.  Now Italian Wedding Soup is a staple on many a soup board in New York.  For some strange reason, I’d never eaten it.  But with its comforting chicken broth, its tiny pastas and robust meatballs, and its good-for-you vegetables, it seemed like the perfect thing to serve for a Saturday supper.  And the perfect place to find a recipe for it is from Easthampton’s own, Ina Garten.  The recipe, from Ina’s 2008 classic “Back to Basics” (Clarkson Potter), is none too labor intensive—if you don’t count the part about making your own stock.  But stock-making on a cold day is almost therapeutic. I’ve included Ina’s own recipe for Chicken stock after the Wedding Soup recipe.  Since I did go ahead and use homemade stock, I can’t vouch for a version without it. But supermarket broth is certainly an option.  Just let me know how it tastes!

Monday, November 5, 2012

A Tale of Three Soups: Jim's Hurricane Survival Soup, Alice Waters' Spicy Cauliflower Soup and Cousin Bar's Pear and Parsnip Soup


Alice Waters' Spicy Cauliflower Soup 
Cousin Bar's Pear and Parsnip Soup with Red Pepper Puree

         This morning I got an email from an old friend and devoted reader of Chewing the Fat.  He lives in Weehawken, NJ, which is one of the areas hard hit by Hurricane Sandy.  He wrote: “I find myself cooking from my dried and canned/jarred goods tonight, over my stove burner.  Would you consider doing a post about how to mix the stuff you have after your fridge and freezer are out of order?  I'm sure lots of folks have tons of stuff that doesn't need to be refrigerated, but how to mix it all up?  Just a thought.” And a terrific one at that! So here’s what I hope will help all those struggling with power failures and cold and food that’s got to be used in a hurry if it can be used at all.  Here’s my suggestion: Make Soup!

Thursday, October 25, 2012

Texas Week Post 2...Kristi's Incredible Harvest Soup



Kristi
         My friend Kristi is something else.  She lives in Dallas where she runs her own business finding "real people" for clients in Advertising and Marketing. She's the best in the business so she's in perpetual motion.  She travels all over the place for her job but when she gets home, she loves to cook.  One day last week, an email arrived from Kristi, heralding the arrival of Fall.  As near as I can understand it, Fall is when the temperature in Dallas drops below 80 degrees for the first time since the previous April.   But Kristi insists that when autumn’s in the air, she makes soup.   And that’s what I did when her recipe hit my in-box.  Kristi’s own invention, Harvest soup is a warming puree of carrots and leeks and onions and sweet potatoes. But what really sets it apart is Kristi’s use of Indian inflected spices—Cardamon, turmeric and cinnamon.  There’s a little chili powder too –how could it come from Texas without it? 

Monday, July 18, 2011

An authenthic Gazpacho recipe from David Rosengarten




         Whatever happened to David Rosengarten?  You may remember the marvelously low-key television chef who preceded the food network rampage that made stars out of everyone from Bobby Flay to Giada di Laurentis.  David’s show “Taste” was a wonderful learning experience as David deep-dived into his subject matter with such thoroughness and thoughtfulness that you came away feeling you had some expertise in whatever food David was extolling on that particular day.