HELPING FAMILY FARMS FLOURISH. HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY.
Showing posts with label Thomas Keller recipes. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Thomas Keller recipes. Show all posts

Thursday, April 24, 2014

Dinner with Thomas Keller: Marinated Skirt Steak and Asparagus with Tomato Bacon Stew


      
L. to R. Eric and Adam 
One night last week, Andrew, our friend Kathy and I all went to see Eric Rippert, the Chef Extraordinaire at New York’s Le Bernardin. Chef Rippert was appearing at the YMHA as part of the “Conversations with Chevaliers” series.  The participants in these talks all have one thing in common: They have all received the prestigious French ‘Legion d’Honneur’ or Order of Arts and Letters from the government of France.  It’s no surprise that Chef Rippert would be so honored. For the 20 years that he has been there,  “Le Bernardin” has been consistently listed at the top of any roster of New York’s best restaurants.  It’s also listed as the #18th best restaurant in the entire world according to San Pellegrino’s World’s 50 Best List.   I’ll save a lot of what Chef Rippert had to say to the moderator, The New Yorker’s Adam Gopnik, for a separate post.  Today I’ll tell you what he recommended when asked “What Cookbooks should a home cook own”.         

To paraphrase, Rippert said you only need 3.  He’d start with any great book that actually teaches you how to cook, the techniques for producing great meals at home.  The books that made this list were Julia Child’s “The Way to Cook” (Alfred A. Knopf 1989) is still in print although you may have to buy it in paperback.  Almost in the same breath, he mentioned the great Jacques Pepin whose “Essential Pepin” (Harcourt Mifflin Harcourt) came out in 2011.  Both books are filled with techniques and skills.  Finally, the author of “Avec Eric” (John Wiley & Son 2010), offered up Thomas Keller’s “Ad Hoc at Home” (Artisan Books 2009) as being the third essential cookbook.  (Cookbook fanciers, like yours truly, were encouraged to hear that Chef Rippert himself has ‘about a 1000 cookbooks’ which sounds about right to me.)
The Great Man himself, Thomas Keller
         Now I have all three of the recommended cookbooks. I have gone to Julia and Jacques for help more times than I could possibly remember.  Thomas Keller, on the other hand, is well-represented in our kitchen but all three volumes we have--“Bouchon”, “The French Laundry” and “Ad Hoc at Home”-- all seemed to fall into the category of ‘too intimidating’ and have remained as ‘coffee-table books’ that just happen to be kept in the kitchen.

Monday, May 21, 2012

Thomas Keller’s Chicken Schnitzel


Chef Thomas Keller
           I was somewhat surprised to come across this recipe in Food and Wine magazine. It comes from the renowned Chef Thomas Keller of Bouchon Bakery, Per Se, Ad Hoc and The French Laundry fame.  He of the $375.00 tasting menu seems to have turned his attention to some $2.99 lb. boneless chicken breasts.  That said, what a wonderful dish this is!  It is crispy, crunchy chicken at its best.  The sauce is a perfect counterbalance with its lemon-y capers in butter drizzled over the top.  This takes all of 15 minutes from start to finish.  And let’s face it, it’s basically fried chicken – no matter what Chef Keller calls it -- and who doesn’t love Fried Chicken ?

Monday, March 5, 2012

Thomas Keller’s recipe for Santa Maria-style Tri-Tip Roast Beef


Chef Thomas Keller 
         When Trader Joe’s came to our neighborhood, it brought plenty of California with it.  Among the items was something called a Tri-Tip Roast of beef.  I’d never heard of the cut at all but TJ’s meat case is full of the stuff.   Trader Joe’s brands practically everything in the store with its own label.  So you’ll find several pre-marinated versions of the Tri-Tip all attributed to the retailer.  I know I should appreciate the time-saving this gives the harried cook who rushes into the store at the end of the day and has to get dinner on the table the moment he or she gets home. But if, like me, you want to control sodium intake and everything else that goes into processed foods, Trader Joe’s offers a virgin version of the beef.  However I still had no idea what the cut was or, for that matter, how to cook it.  Then I ran across a recipe for Tri-Tip from none other than the great Thomas Keller.