HELPING FAMILY FARMS FLOURISH. HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY.
Showing posts with label Turkey. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Turkey. Show all posts

Monday, December 8, 2014

Lazy Man's Lasagna with Turkey Sausage Bolognese


        


At our house, we seem to have gone into high Christmas gear this week. So I have decided to feature posts from now until the big day that minimize your time in the kitchen and maximize the flavor you get out of some terrific recipes all that come together in under an hour at most.   The first is a Lasagne recipe that knocked me out. I have to confess to having been a terrible Lasagna snob.  I think true lasagna is rich in béchamel sauce, with a ragu that’s been melding flavors for hours in an all-afternoon of cooking and reducing and tasting.  My kitchen has been draped with crinkle-edged lasagna noodles parboiled on the stove more times than I can remember.  And I still make lasagna that way.  Not for me the Americanized versions that I’d been subjected to at some long-ago student dinners.  The version I found most awful was the one with cottage cheese.  But I was craving a baked pasta dish when I came across a recipe in Bon Appetit that gave a prep time of 45 minutes and then baked for another 45.  This sounded very do-able on a weeknight.  But believe it or not, I managed to cut the time down to a little over an hour!  And this lasagna, while hardly authentic Italian, is absolutely terrific.  It’s so good, it should be emailed to everyone in the family who says they can’t cook.  It’s so good, it would convince a girl to marry the guy who made it.   And since this recipe is for 4 servings, you won’t be left eating a huge pan of lasagna until Spring.  Served with a green salad, it’s a dinner not to be forgotten.

Friday, November 28, 2014

Thanksgiving Way Out West: The Remains of the Day...Turkey Tetrazini so good, you may want to roast another Turkey




         This is my absolute favorite Thanksgiving recipe.  It is such a favorite that I have been known to cook a turkey or turkey breast just to make it.  It also is a great sentimental favorite because it was one of the first pieces of food writing I ever had published In Saveur Magazine. And then there is its provenance: Our dear friend Michael Grim introduced me to its creator, Anne Jaindl, a family friend with whom Michael’s late father Bill had worked.


Tuesday, May 27, 2014

Turkey Meat Loaves with Red Pepper Sauce


         I first wrote this post way back in 2010 when the blog was still quite new.  This year, Memorial Day put a crimp in my writing as we were up to our ears in gardening and celebrating the start of our being in the Hamptons more and more. So when I went searching for something to share with you today, I came across this recipe. It surprised me to see that it never attracted an audience because it really is worth making.  Even if you, like me, have very little fondness for ground turkey.  I’ll grant all those who extoll its low-fat virtues that it’s about as low as you can go, but to me it’s also low on taste and low on juice and low on my list of things I love to cook.  But an article in an old Food and Wine intrigued me.  It was entitled “French food that won’t make you fat”.  Now there’s something I can sink my teeth into.  And it has a very solid pedigree.  Its inventor is the chef Sandro Gamba who cooked under Joel Robichon and Alain Ducasse, was Food and Wine magazine’s Best New Chef of 2001.        
        Apparently tired of rendering French classics at Nomi, in Chicago’s Park Hyatt Hotel, Chef Gamba quit his job and began to look for a place where he could cook “cleaner” and healthier versions of his mentors’ specialties.  He landed at the Four Seasons in Westlake Village, CA which welcomed his healthy approach at all five restaurants on the property.  Unfortunately, visa problems sent him back to France where he spent two years at Sofitel headquarters as their Corporate Chef.  From there he went on to Geneva where he was the Food and Beverage director at the Intercontinental. Now, and for the last two years, he's been the Executive Chef at the Emirates Palace Hotel in Abu Dhabi.  I have to wonder if he's introduced his staff of 300 (!) to the virtues of his turkey meatloaf.  But I do know I'd like to re-introduce it to you.  

Monday, August 6, 2012

The Perfect Turkey Burger with a little help from Cook’s Illustrated



         I am sure you’re aware of “Cook’s Illustrated” that quirky and incomparable publication presided over by a man named Christopher Kimball.  Mr. Kimball is the quintessential Vermonter and his practicality is evident on every page of his strictly-no-advertising-that’s-why-it-costs-$30-a year magazine.  Personally, its attention to detail and minutiae is fascinating although I could live without some of the “Quick Tips” which readers send in. In the most recent issue these include suggestions like using coffee filters to oil a grill grate and shoe organizers to store spices. On the other hand, the product reviews for everything from non-stick cookware to hot sauce are invaluable.  And then, of course, there is the length the Cook’s Illustrated Test Kitchen goes to perfecting recipes for everything from crab cakes to apple pan dowdy.  Take, for instance, their recent examination of the Turkey Burger.

Thursday, November 10, 2011

Turkey Meatloaf with Spicy Tomato Jam



         Ground turkey is not my favorite protein, not by a long shot. But I know many people adore the stuff. For its low fat, high protein content, it’s hard to beat.  The difference between it and ground beef is startling.  A mix of dark and white ground turkey saves 154 calories and 20 grams of fat over an identical sized serving of beef.  My problem is that most of the time I don’t think ground turkey holds a candle to the flavor of its alternative.  The exception that proves the rule is this incredible meatloaf.  It’s full of flavor in the loaf itself with its layer of shitake mushrooms and roasted red peppers.  And then there’s the incredible Spicy Tomato Jam that tops it. So good! And it looks as good as it tastes.  Altogether this is well worth cooking. I’d even go so far as to say I might serve it to guests.  Although I’d really rather have extra leftover because I love a great meatloaf sandwich and this meatloaf makes a great one.

Friday, February 18, 2011

The Chef’s Diet Secret: Turkey Chili


      Quite honestly, to me ground turkey is one of life’s bigger turnoffs. In order to achieve its undoubtedly low calorie profile, every possible bit of fat has been given the heave ho leaving the cook desperate for ways to make it palatable.  Have you noticed how often Turkey Burgers are covered with cheese and all manners of ‘special sauces’ to make up for their lack of taste?  Of course, this completely defeats the purpose of eating the stuff in the first place.  But there are ways to add flavor and still keep the calorie count under control.  One of them is Turkey Chili.

Friday, November 26, 2010

Got Turkey? This Turkey Tetrazini is so good, you might want to roast another bird






I am so fond of this recipe, I have, on at least one occasion, cooked a turkey merely to have the meat for this dish. I also have a sentimental attachment to this delicious way to eat leftover turkey.

That’s because one of the first pieces of food writing I ever had published included this recipe. And there is its provenance: Our dear friend Michael Grim introduced me to its creator, Anne Jaindl, a family friend with whom Michael’s late father Bill had worked.

Saturday, November 28, 2009

A recipe for Turkey Tetrazini so good, you may want to roast another bird. Seriously.






I am so fond of this recipe, I have, on at least one occasion, cooked a turkey merely to have the meat for this dish. I also have a sentimental attachment to this delicious way to eat leftover turkey.


That’s because one of the first pieces of food writing I ever had published included this recipe. And there is its provenance: Our dear friend Michael Grim introduced me to its creator, Anne Jaindl, a family friend with whom Michael’s late father Bill had worked.