HELPING FAMILY FARMS FLOURISH. HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY.
Showing posts with label Tyler Florence. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Tyler Florence. Show all posts

Monday, June 2, 2014

Asparagus for Breakfast, Brunch, Lunch and Dinner

  
         To say that I’m a fan of our local Long Island asparagus is the definition of an understatement.  I really cannot get enough of the stuff.  It’s a fixture in our refrigerator for as long as it lasts.  The asparagus I am particularly attached to is grown at Tom Falkowski’s farm which is right over the hill from our house.  This year, the ground was still frozen well into April so the asparagus was late in coming to the Falkowski’s farm stand, Country Garden.  But now that it’s there and not likely to remain nearly as long as I’d like, I’ve taken every advantage of it.  I’ve sought recipes that use it differently from the twelve other asparagus recipes I’ve blogged about before.  So if, by any chance, today’s offerings don’t please your palate, please feel free to use the Search function on the left side of the page and peruse to your hearts content.   But if you stay here, I’ll show you how to put a Spanish take on the vegetable and making it a hearty breakfast or brunch option or even a breakfast-for-dinner option, how to transform it into a dinner curry and finally I’ll show you Tyler Florence’s cooking technique that puts the stalks in a paper bag and cooks then perfectly in the oven. So here goes:

Monday, August 26, 2013

Scallop Saltimbocca with Golden Delicious Apples


        When I lived in Rome, Saltimbocca was an introduction to the cuisine of the city itself.   “Saltimbocca alla Romana” featured veal, topped with Prosciutto and Sage in a Marsala and butter sauce.   It was very good and, because of its ingredients, more expensive than most entrees at the trattorias where we ate as students.  It was, therefore, a treat reserved for the days right after our allowances arrived from home.  
       Saltimbocca means “jump in the mouth” although I could never figure out if that was because the taste ‘jumped’ in your mouth or because the dish was so delicious, you literally couldn’t wait to eat it.  Either way, I love Saltimbocca.  So the other day, when I was looking for something quick and easy to cook, I gravitated to a Tyler Florence recipe (again) that featured Scallops, instead of veal, and a lemon, olive oil and butter sauce in lieu of the Marsala and butter sauce of my student days.  It is well worth repeating here.

Thursday, July 19, 2012

Crab Cakes with Buttermilk- Basil Dressing and Marinated Tomatoes and Corn adapted from Tyler Florence

  
         Crab Cakes are one of those dishes that are just about perfect just about anytime of year.  They’re a snap to make and you can have them cooked and kept warming in the warming drawer until you’re ready to serve your guests.   This wonderful recipe uses a lot of crab and not a lot of bread  which is key to a great crab cake.   This particular take caught our eye because it seemed like just the right thing to serve for one of our  lunches around the pool.   Its pedigree is very reassuring.  There’s not much that Tyler Florence doesn’t do perfectly and this is but one example. It’s from his late, lamented column in House Beautiful, “Tyler’s Kitchen”.  Tyler combines three summer favorites that are at their peak right now.  There’s fresh basil in the dressing.  And there are 3 varieties of tomatoes and sweet corn.   The corn is gorgeous cooked a way I’d never tried before and it was a revelation all by itself.

Monday, January 30, 2012

White Bean and Roasted Shrimp Salad with Cherry Tomato Vinaigrette



         If ever a cookbook cover said it all, it’s this: Brilliant Simple Food to Make Anytime.  That’s what Tyler Florence’s “Tyler’s Ultimate” (Clarkson Potter 2006) says and it couldn’t be more true.  Take for instance this deliciously satisfying dinner salad.  It would be appropriate to serve in the dead of summer but it was a wonderful treat in January.  It could be the centerpiece of a ladies lunch but we used it as dinner for the two of us men.  And as far as ‘simple’ goes, it calls for just two baking sheets and is on the table in a half hour.  Now that’s brilliant.

Thursday, December 2, 2010

Baked Rigatoni with Eggplant and Sausage, Parmigiano Cheese Bread and a Honey and Pignoli Tart that’s to die for.


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 Last weekend we had a post Thanksgiving dinner party.  Since everyone was pretty well stuffed with Turkey, we wanted something completely different -- a crowd-pleaser on a cold night.  So we went for a dinner that's 'tutto italiano' from main course to desert.  Now baked pasta dishes are a risky business.  Those giant pans of baked ziti come to mind. I remember going to a long ago dinner party when one wag, seeing that very dish on the sideboard, described it as being “like having dinner at Riker’s” (New York City’s jail).  But the recipe for Baked Rigatoni was intriguing because its author, Tyler Florence, not only has a last name in common with Italy but a very deft hand at making wonderful Italian Food.  What’s nice about this dish, from Tyler’s Ultimate series, is the way the top gets completely crusty while what lies beneath is layers of pure flavor—of mozzarella, sausage and eggplant and the pasta itself moist and delicious.  Served with a really beautiful green salad, this dish was a big hit.
Keith's Green Salad was a big hit
Accompanying our Baked Rigatoni, I made Parmigiano Cheese Bread.  Now my version is not specifically an Italian creation.  Bruschetta may be its cousin but most people consider this wonderful garlic-y, buttery invention as strictly American.  It’s relatively easy to make and it is wildly popular—we literally had a guest microwave a piece on his way out the door. 
Finally, Andrew topped off the meal with a truly wonderful and very Italian dessert.  It’s a “Crostata di Miele e Pignoli”, a honey and pignoli nut tart that combines a sweet and slightly salty filling with honey and pine nuts. Now this recipe has a great pedigree.  It is from Gina di Palma, whose “Dolce Italiano” is a treasure trove.  Ms. di Palma is the pastry chef at “Babbo”, Chef Mario Batali’s first big hit restaurant in New York.  Her cookbook is described as being ‘for those home cooks who, like Gina, lie awake at night in bed dreaming of the perfect dessert’.   I haven’t noticed Andrew losing sleep over his desserts and this one is so good, you wouldn’t.   Andrew described it as a kind Italian pecan pie.   I adore pecan pie but I’d have to say, I actually liked this better.  And we got to use our fabulous “Bee’s Needs” honey that’s made in the Hamptons by my friend, Mary Woltz. This pie, topped with a tiny scoop of Vanilla Gelato, was completely devoured by our guests.  Not one slice was left. 

Monday, August 30, 2010

Grilled Swordfish with Lemon Aioli and Fennel



        Our friends Beth and Peter are with us from California for a few days and we’re anxious to share some of Long Island’s best with them. This will include the spectacular weather we’re experiencing, our glorious beaches—less crowded now that a lot of our summer population is already off to college—and, of course, the incredible bounty of great things to eat that we’re blessed with at this moment.

Monday, August 2, 2010

Ratatouille with Fairy Tale Eggplant



      






If you’ve read much Chewing the Fat lately, you may remember David Falkowski, our local “Mushroom Man”, who supplies us with wonderful fresh and dried mushrooms at our local Farmer’s Markets. (You can read about these markets and David by on the most recent New York Times article here: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/18/nyregion/18dineli.html?_r=1&scp=1&sq=Sag%20Harbor%20Farmer's%20Market&st=cse). A couple of weeks ago, while we were at the Saturday morning market in Sag Harbor, we were visiting David’s table and there we saw some tiny little eggplants about 2 or 3 inches long.  David told us they were Fairy Tale eggplants.  He said customers were coming back weekly to buy more so he knew he had a hit on his hands.  The next thing we knew, there they were in New York magazine’s August 2nd Food section being extolled for their lack of both major seeds and any bitterness associated with their larger cousins.  We hustled home with ours and decided to make them the basis for the best ratatouille we’d ever tasted. 

Thursday, July 8, 2010

Strip Steaks with Brandied Porcini Mushroom Sauce


I love to pan sauté steaks.  They get a really good caramelized topping and they’re very easy to cook.  I realize it may be the height of barbecue season, but it’s really oppressively hot outside.  So I bring this recipe to your attention because you can cook it quickly and easily and stay in the Air Conditioning while you do.   And you actually couldn’t really get this recipe right on the grill because you need the pan drippings for the sauce.  So keep cool and eat like a king.

Friday, May 7, 2010

New York Strip Steaks with Mushroom Sauce and Cornmeal-Crusted Onion Rings


      
        Friday night has been Steak night at our house for a long time. New York Strip is right up there with our favorites.  It’s easy to cook on the stove top and the chewier texture of the steak appeals to the meat-eater extinct.  You can be a purist and simply salt and pepper the steak vigorously, put it into a very hot pan with a tablespoon of peanut oil and one of butter and you’ve got a beautiful steak in about 8 minutes.  But occasionally we like to try it with a sauce to give it another dimension.  This mushroom sauce is both easy and delicious, a take on one we say Tyler Florence making on Tyler’s Ultimate, his terrific show on Food Network. And along with it, nothing goes better than Ina Garten’s Cornmeal Crusted Onion Rings and some simple sautéed spinach.  So on to the recipes.


Monday, April 12, 2010

Sole Almandine and the perfect accompaniment, Lemon Smashed Potatoes


     
         I love shopping in Chinatown.  Just coming out of the subway at Grand Street is like being transported to Hong Kong.   Except that the parts of Hong Kong I’m familiar with have a lot more Westerners than New York’s Chinatown does.  Except for Mulberry street and its plethora of red Sauce Italian places offering a free glass of wine to the overwhelmingly tourist crowd,   Chinatown has pretty well taken over what was once Little Italy. And food shopping there is a terrific experience.  If only it were closer, I could save a fortune.  The prices are simply astonishing.  How about 3 lemons for a dollar?  Or a huge knob of ginger for .70 cents? And how about the freshest Gray sole, beautifully filleted, for $3.95 a lb?  Seriously!


Friday, March 19, 2010

Beef Bourguignon courtesy Tyler Florence



        As it hits 70 degrees here in New York today, I realized that this recipe is going to be as out of season as your snow boots if I don’t get it out fast.  And although I don’t want to be the Grinch who stole Spring, we are supposed to dip back into the forties next week. “Jeesh”, as our Canadian friends would say.   But if you want to say one final farewell to winter, you could do a whole lot worse than latching onto Tyler Florence’s recipe for Beef Bourguignon.