HELPING FAMILY FARMS FLOURISH. HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY.
Showing posts with label Veal. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Veal. Show all posts

Thursday, January 31, 2013

Veal Short Ribs alla Marsala adapted from Chef Michael Ponzio. And my first encounter with Fresh Direct



Chef Michael Ponzio of Chicago's
Rosebud on Rush
         When I saw a special for Veal Short Ribs at 4.99 a lb, it was like discovering a new protein!  I’d never even heard of the cut and never seen it on a restaurant menu.  I couldn’t wait to try them.  In searching around for the perfect recipe for them, I quickly discovered that a sizeable number of cooks just switch out beef short ribs for veal and call it a day.  The recipes were all standard short ribs recipes. Not that there’s anything wrong with that.  In frigid New York, Andrew and I had stopped in at Epicerie Boulud (1900 Broadway NY NY) this weekend and Andrew had a bowl of Short Rib Chili which he pronounced delicious.  But when you discover something as auspicious as a new protein, surely you want a recipe created just for Veal.  I stumbled across one.  It was from Chef Michael Ponzio whose cooking is done at “Rosebud on Rush”, a venerable Chicago restaurant at 720 N. Rush St. (at Superior St.) Chicago, IL 60611 Tel: 312-266-6444.  Though Chef Ponzio’s recipe is nowhere to be found on the restaurant’s current menu, there were enough dishes on it to know the man knows his way around a piece of Veal. So I set out to make my first Veal Short Ribs.  But how I got the ribs in the first place is worth telling. 

Thursday, October 4, 2012

Tyler Florence's California Osso Buco with a Classic Gremolata



         When I started cooking Osso Buco, it was a sumptuous meal on a beer budget.  The Veal Shanks at the center of the dish were afterthoughts at the butcher’s counter.  It’s hard to imagine but I think they ran about $4.99 a lb. at most.  Andrew is fond of pointing out that I have no concept of how many years ago that was and that in 25 years almost everything is more expensive. But, like fresh tuna, which at one point was practically given away, the huge popularity of this Italian masterpiece has upped its price mightily.   Osso Buco means ‘bone with a hole in it’ and it’s gotten to be a very expensive bone.  But it’s a triumph of taste—the meat is tender to the bone, the sauce is filled with fresh vegetables stewed to perfection in red wine and tomatoes—even the marrow in the center of the bone is a guilty pleasure.   The recipe hails from Lombardy, the region that’s home to Milano, where it is classically served atop risotto.  Since risotto needs constant attention until the minute it is served, I use mashed potatoes instead.  Because I find Osso Buco is one of the greatest ideas for weeknight dinner parties.  We were entertaining my nephew, Michael and his wife, Valery who were here from Canada.   Leaving out the risotto meant I could spend all the time I wanted with them and then take all of about 5 minutes to mash the potatoes.   Like so many other braised dishes, this one too improves considerably when left a day or three in the fridge.  So it’s perfect to make over on a Sunday afternoon to serve later in the week.  I’ve published a recipe for Osso Buco before. So why is this one here?

Thursday, November 4, 2010

A Visit to Eataly yields a delicious Veal Pasta Sauce




        Eataly, in case you haven’t heard, is a 42,000 square foot grocery emporium that’s just opened at 200 Fifth Avenue.  And everything in it hails from or owes its existence to Italy from the on-premises cooking school to the rooftop beer garden.   The original Eataly opened in Turin in 2007.  At 50,000 square feet, the mother ship is even larger than this enormously impressive store in New York.  And Turin was followed by the opening of smaller branches in Bologna and Milano and even smaller ones in two locations in Japan.  The full name of the store is Eataly Alti Cibi which translates to “High Food”.  But think “Specialty Foods” and you get better idea of both the selection and the price points. 

Monday, January 11, 2010

A Quick and Easy Weeknight recipe: Orecchiette with a Veal, Caper and White Wine Sauce.




There are plenty of people I’d love to spend time cooking with:
My heroes like Tyler Florence, who seems to make everything I like.
Ina Garten, who makes everything look so effortless.  Thomas Keller who makes everything look well, so, complicated.  But I’d have to say that Grace Parisi is near the top of my list.   And this fantastic recipe is a reason why all by itself. 

Monday, December 14, 2009

Osso Buco, the Perfect Dinner Party Fare for right now.



What’s wonderful about this delicious entrĂ©e is that it only improves with a day or two in the refrigerator. And you just reheat it, mash some potatoes, toss a salad and a truly special dinner is on the table in no time.