HELPING FAMILY FARMS FLOURISH. HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY.
Showing posts with label Vietnamese Food. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Vietnamese Food. Show all posts

Sunday, March 9, 2014

Direct from St Barth via Vietnam: The Banh Mi Sandwich


        
We’ve brought you a post featuring the Banh Mi, the signature sandwich of Vietnam, once before.  We’ve shown you how to make one with ground pork http://www.chewingthefat.us.com/2012/09/our-325th-post-melissa-clarks-quick.html .  But just before we left New York for our annual stay in St.
Epicerie Boulud's Banh Mi 
Barthelemy in the French West Indies, we tucked into one at our favorite neighborhood Banh Mi provider, Epicerie Boulud on Broadway and 64th Street.  I realized this particular version would be a snap to put together in St. Barth, land of pate, smoked ham and Merquez sausages.  All I had to do was to pickle some carrots and shallots, load up on Dijon Mayonnaise and I’d have it made.  Banh Mi is a very forgiving sandwich.  This is because the actual translation from the Vietnamese for Banh Mi is ‘Bread’—all kinds of bread.  More specifically, it refers to the Baguette, introduced by the French when Vietnam was a French colony, a part of Indochine.  In Vietnam, the baguette is a single serve item, a far shorter loaf than we’re accustomed to in the States or even in St. Barths.  But the character of the baguette here closely mimics the Vietnamese ideal—a thinner crust and an airier crumb.  So we had the perfect ingredients for the perfect Banh Mi.

Thursday, April 25, 2013

Vietnamese Shrimp Sliders adapted from Melissa Clark in The New York Times


         

I don't know when sliders took over the world but they're everywhere. And while they may have started out as mini-hamburgers, now you can find them on all kinds of menus, stuffed with everything from Turkey to Texas barbecue.  Let's face it, their size is ideal.  In one or two bites, you get the full-on slider experience.  They're just the right size for children, for whom a full-sized burger is a challenge.  In today's post, they're made with crispy fried shrimp dipped into a salty lime sauce and then tucked into tiny brioche buns that have been slathered with an Asian inflected mayonaise. They're a gift from the inventive Melissa Clark whose Wednesday food column in the New York Times is eagerly awaited in our house. This time, Melissa has gone East for her flavors.

Monday, September 17, 2012

Our 325th Post! Melissa Clark's Quick Banh Mi with Pickled Carrots and Daikon


  
         Today marks another milestone on Chewing the Fat. It’s our 325th post and sometime in the very near future we will achieve our 300,000th page view.  Not bad for a couple of self-taught cooks who just love to bake and cook and have never had a lesson in our lives. But that was the whole idea when we started: If we can cook it or bake it, you can cook it or bake it.   And although it may appear that we are whizzes in the kitchen, I can quite promise you that Andrew and I do not share our bombs—our souffl├ęs that flop, our spice mixtures gone haywire, our cakes that didn’t rise.  We never publish anything that didn’t turn out right until it does turn out right.  I think this is why when we get comments from Mary in Oyster Bay, Kate in Alberta, Lauren in Dallas or Bubbles in Montreal, I am always so pleased that they really use the recipes we post, that their guests and/or husbands love their cooking.  So here’s to all of us who get our kicks in the kitchen, who love discovering new tastes, new adventures in cooking old favorites and new ways to please everyone who comes to our table. And one more thing:  Just when I think what can I possibly cook today? How can I find something new to share with our readers?  Along comes a recipe like today’s Banh Mi sandwich with its Pickled Carrots and Daikon.  And for the first time, I made my own pickles in all of 30 minutes flat.  And guess what? If I can make my own pickles, you can too. 

Wednesday, May 12, 2010

Vietnamese Shrimp and Pork Belly with Sweet and Spicy Sauce





Ever since my last trip to Hong Kong, where, on our last night there, we went to a Vietnamese Restaurant called “Pho Lemon” (25 Elgin St. Central, TEL: 2523-8272) I have wanted to cook Vietnamese food.  There’s likely nowhere on earth where you can find such a confluence of Asian cuisine as there is in Hong Kong.  During my last trip there, we’d eaten Japanese, Korean, Malaysian and of course, Chinese food from Hunanese to Cantonese.  Fantastic food in some of the finest places in the city.   So when, on that particular night, I had a roast chicken that was one of the finest I had ever eaten, I was determined to learn how to cook it.