If I can cook it, you can cook it And I'll travel the world to bring it back home to you.

Beef Bourguignon courtesy Tyler Florence

 
        As it hits 70 degrees here in New York today, I realized that this recipe is going to be as out of season as your snow boots if I don’t get it out fast.  And although I don’t want to be the Grinch who stole Spring, we are supposed to dip back into the forties next week. “Jeesh”, as our Canadian friends would say.   But if you want to say one final farewell to winter, you could do a whole lot worse than latching onto Tyler Florence’s recipe for Beef Bourguignon.

        Now I realize that in the not-too-distant past we were all glued to our movie theater seats watching “Julie and Julia” at the disastrous point when “Julie” destroyed “Julia’s” version by falling asleep.  This is not impossible when a recipe starts, as Julia’s does, by removing rind from a 6 ounce chunk of bacon , dicing it into lardons, then simmering both rind and bacon for 10 minutes.  No, Tyler’s recipe seems a lot simpler than that.  One you’ve got the prep done, in about 45 minutes,You can wander off with a glass of red wine and stir occasionally. 
        I confess that I have been tempted by quicker Bouguignon recipes, one from a cook I consider above reproach, only to be very disappointed in the results.  Tyler’s recipe is a triumph!  Absolutely delicious!  But as Julia herself points out in “Mastering the Art of French Cooking”, “there are more ways than one to arrive at a good boeuf bourguignon”.  And this is most certainly one of them.


1 thought on “Beef Bourguignon courtesy Tyler Florence”

  • Monte,
    I have a friend, Janice Manhoff who's a brilliant cook, who insists cooking is chemistry and that you can't possibly substitute any ingredients.

    Ha! I made your recipe with a beautiful bottle of burgundy (check), brandy instead of cognac, a great cut of shoulder beef from my butcher who said "use this" and finally the coup de gras, herbs de provence. I thought I had dried rosemary and thyme. Alas, only thyme. So I grabbed the herbs de provence and said to myself, it's all from France and this is a french dish so what the heck. Monte, it was superb. Tender, juicy and sirloin tips couldn't have been better.

    Feel free to post.
    Lynn, the creative improviser

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